The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2004
    Posts
    120

    Default Which would you buy?

    I am THINKING of buying a colt/gelding for the purposes of 1) playmate/companion for my lone 2010 colt and 2) to either train and sell later or keep for myself if I really end up liking what I buy. (My colt is for sale also.)

    I do not have a big budget because I am supposed to be SELLING horses, not buying them right now - LOL!

    Found 2 I am considering in my price range.

    First is a 2-yr-old registered warmblood by a now-deceased stallion that showed GP VERY successfully. Nice dam line also. Reason he is in my price range is that although he flexes sound, x-rays show changes in one hock. Interested in him because I own a mare by the same stallion that I show and she is wonderful. He would be a lovely dressage horse, assuming he stays sound. He is at the same place I bought my mare from so I trust the people to be honest with me.

    Second is a 2010 Welsh/warmblood cross by a Welsh stallion that I have been wanting to breed to but it just hasn't worked out. Very pretty and flashy but unknown how tall he might get. 14.1-14.3hh is the likely mature height. I have ridden and shown a 14.3hh horse before and could get away with a 14.1hh pony but that is really smaller than I would prefer. 15hh would be perfect for me but not perfect for resale!

    So, which would be the better choice?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2007
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    1,092

    Default

    Neither. If you feel you don't have the money to buy, just board someone else's horse/foal for companionship.
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2004
    Posts
    120

    Default

    I have the money, just probably don't need to be spending it on horse #7 - LOL. And I am not going to spend $10K on another horse. Am looking in the $7,500 or below range (preferably $4-6K.)

    Yes, boarding someone else's weanling/yearling would be kind of ideal. Although I don't particularly want someone complaining and trying to tell me how to run my own farm. And then there is the issue if the boarder horse gets hurt, as horses are known to do. So, while I have thought about it, I don't know anyone with a colt (or maybe a retiree that is good with youngsters) that needs a place to board it and I don't want to take in a stranger's horse.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,994

    Default

    I'd go with the pony...! More options for resale, especially if it can jump, and you're less likely to want to keep it for yourself!
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    806

    Default

    Where are you located? I have some PROVEN baby upbringing masters and no babies

    I would go with #2 - you are less likely to want to keep for yourself and while ponies bring less then horses, lame horses don't bring anything. While the horse youngster is sound now, who knows what he will be like in 1+yrs + work? Lots of people are very leery of changes that show up on x-rays.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorseShopping View Post
    I have the money, just probably don't need to be spending it on horse #7 - LOL. And I am not going to spend $10K on another horse. Am looking in the $7,500 or below range (preferably $4-6K.)

    Yes, boarding someone else's weanling/yearling would be kind of ideal. Although I don't particularly want someone complaining and trying to tell me how to run my own farm. And then there is the issue if the boarder horse gets hurt, as horses are known to do. So, while I have thought about it, I don't know anyone with a colt (or maybe a retiree that is good with youngsters) that needs a place to board it and I don't want to take in a stranger's horse.
    Can't tell where you're located, but chances are there's a rescue in your area that could use a foster home for a nice pasture pal or knows someone with a young horse that needs a home. Not much money involved and you can do a good deed and get that warm and fuzzy feeling of goodness!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,521

    Default

    I'd go with the first. Nothing about ponies appeals to me. The hock changes are pretty common, so if everything else vetted ok I'd be much happier, and you'd end up with a better resale, imo.

    I actually don't think a second colt is the companion answer to your first colt. Although for a few months it would b fun to see them play together, pretty soon they wouldn't be hanging out together. I think the second horse is something you want.

    If what you really want is another project, get the first colt. If what you really want is a companion to your colt get an older gelding or other kind of barn animal to be his pet.

    Good luck.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    406

    Default

    I wouldn't buy anything with problems on x-rays this early- that would be hard to re-sell.

    Ponies have a very limited market- especially since there are German Riding ponies, I am not sure how easy it would be to sell...

    Here is a cutie priced at $5,500:
    http://www.dressagemarket.com/listin.../listing/1013/

    And if you go to the top of your range- this one looks outstanding for $7,500:
    http://www.dressagemarket.com/listin...w/listing/824/
    Welcome to my dressage world http://www.juliefranzen.blogspot.com/



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2004
    Posts
    120

    Default

    To clarify, pony colt is registered with Wesser-Ems (pony branch of GOV.) So, he is technically a "German Riding Pony."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    6,349

    Default

    I have one lone filly this year and I too thought about buying a prospect to bring along and keep her company (even tried a couple). However, I ended up making arrangements to have her go hang out after inspection this fall at a bigger breeder's farm. Next spring she should be good to go out with our mares (probably would be now, but I think having babies play together is important). In my case, I decided on the risk/reward ratio that the risks are too great that it won't be a money maker, and even worse could get injured, be a pill under saddle and hard to place, etc.

    If it is just companionship, there are lots of free, older or injured horses out there. What if your colt sells? Will you still want the project horse?

    Re: your two options--I'd keep looking. Hock changes can be a hard sell, unless the horse has a show record and is performing soundly in real work. I'm seeing low pony prices--maybe better where you are though...
    Good luck with whatever you decide to do!
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2003
    Location
    Citra, Fl, USA
    Posts
    1,883

    Default

    Well, I say option number 2 hands down. However, I have a feeling number 2 is my pony!!!! LOL, I'm terribly biased. FYI- He is a German Riding Pony...and a very fancy one at that. The only reason he is even for sale is because he is a boy. If he were a filly you would not be able to pry him away from me, lol.

    I have been in the OP's dilema twice. The first time I bought a GRP colt to be a companion for one I bought in utero. Ironicly, I ended up selling the original pony and the "companion" is my licensed stallion! My point, you may fall in love with your bargain buy

    The other time I boarded a strangers colt...which was a fine short term solution.
    Whispered Wish Weser-Ems: Breeding quality German Riding Ponies!
    Standing the stallion Burberry
    www.germanridingpony.com
    www.facebook.com/HighlifesBurberry



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Posts
    1,423

    Default

    Depends on what the hock problem is. Is it an OCD? Arthritic changes? A break? Is the horse currently COMPLETELY sound?

    I would need the answers to these questions before making a decision.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2008
    Posts
    1,637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorseShopping View Post
    ....
    First is a 2-yr-old registered warmblood by a now-deceased stallion that showed GP VERY successfully. Nice dam line also. Reason he is in my price range is that although he flexes sound, x-rays show changes in one hock. Interested in him because I own a mare by the same stallion that I show and she is wonderful. He would be a lovely dressage horse, assuming he stays sound. He is at the same place I bought my mare from so I trust the people to be honest with me.
    ..................
    So, which would be the better choice?
    My personal opinion (based on personal experience) is that X-rays are worthless if the horse is clinically sound.

    I bought a 2 yr old Hanoverian (german bred) by Dynamo, top Hanoverian sire. The price was "right" because of questionable X-rays of Left hock. I bought him. After the fact, I showed X-rays to a vet who said not to buy him....emphatically.

    I kept said horse for 12 years. He never took a lame step. I got interested in another breed, which he had to finance part of the purchase price. To prepare him for sale, I took him to New Bolton for bilateral hock X-rays. Turned out the Right hock was worse than the left. The X-rays of the Left hock showed no changes in 12 years.

    I sold him to buy a young stallion.

    If you know the sellers, and trust them, then go for it. If you want to haggle a bit, then use the hock X-rays to negotiate the price down. There is no "perfect horse." All horses are a heart-beat away from being dog food or a kick away from being a cripple.

    If I had listened to the vet, I would have missed out on a fabulous horse. Definitely bought me points at shows.

    Since you know and like the breeding lines.....go for it!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,997

    Default

    If this is for your colt, go with option #2, as they sound to be almost the same age (this is what my BO has done several times & it has worked out very well: she also has a very fair older gelding that puts manners on the kids but he is only forced to endure the company of foals at intervals )

    If this is more about you, then choose whichever one you just can't stop thinking about.

    Option 3 - buy both & sell one of your other horses or whichever "companion" you like less next year (expecially since it sounds as if both may appeal more to you than your own colt)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    You buy #1 I will take #2 LOL



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2004
    Posts
    120

    Default

    My colt is VERY nice and is going to be a dressage super star. Didn't mean to give the impression I didn't like him. He is very correct and a fancy, fancy mover. I would be keeping him if he was a filly.

    Rationally, I probably just need to try to figure out how to make things work with the horses I have. I do have a mare that has been a good foal sitter. But, I have never had a colt so not sure how she will do with a colt. And, this is a mare I ride and want to start showing again. So, we will be going to lessons, clinics and shows and that is problematic if she is the sole companion for the colt.

    If he was a girl, it would be no problem. Would start with the one mare that I know is good with weanling fillies and then add a 3rd once they get settled. And maybe I can still try that even though he is a rowdy boy. A lot will depend on when I can get him gelded.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2000
    Location
    Wilds of the Blue Ridge foothills
    Posts
    187

    Default

    Having another baby around for yours to play with is a good thing. However, having an older horse around to teach him manners: priceless.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorseShopping View Post
    I am THINKING of buying a colt/gelding for the purposes of 1) playmate/companion for my lone 2010 colt and 2) to either train and sell later or keep for myself if I really end up liking what I buy. (My colt is for sale also.)

    I do not have a big budget because I am supposed to be SELLING horses, not buying them right now - LOL!

    Found 2 I am considering in my price range.

    First is a 2-yr-old registered warmblood by a now-deceased stallion that showed GP VERY successfully. Nice dam line also. Reason he is in my price range is that although he flexes sound, x-rays show changes in one hock. Interested in him because I own a mare by the same stallion that I show and she is wonderful. He would be a lovely dressage horse, assuming he stays sound. He is at the same place I bought my mare from so I trust the people to be honest with me.

    Second is a 2010 Welsh/warmblood cross by a Welsh stallion that I have been wanting to breed to but it just hasn't worked out. Very pretty and flashy but unknown how tall he might get. 14.1-14.3hh is the likely mature height. I have ridden and shown a 14.3hh horse before and could get away with a 14.1hh pony but that is really smaller than I would prefer. 15hh would be perfect for me but not perfect for resale!

    So, which would be the better choice?
    niether- if your selling your colt then sell him, dont get another as monies tight
    not fair on any of the horses mentioned



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2004
    Posts
    120

    Default

    Once again, to clarify, money is not "tight." I CAN afford to care for my horses. One more is not going to be an overwhelming financial burden. We have 40 acres and 6 stalls in the main barn. Have a pasture with a 2-stall "run-in" also. So, 7 horses is doable but not ideal. (I'd like for everyone to have a stall in the main barn when the weather is really bad.)

    The main reason for my "budget" on buying is husband is non-horsey and no way I would feel it is fair for me to spend over $7,500 on a horse when I already have 6!

    I do feel sorry for my colt with no one to play with. Today he was hanging out in a stall (he and mom have 2 stalls they can access from their pasture) and whinnied a few times while his mom was out grazing, ignoring him. I think he'd be MUCH happier with a colt his own age to play with.

    So, maybe the answer is to get a colt his age and then turn the foal sitter mare out with both of them. That way, if I take her for a lesson, clinic or show they still have each other. Just not sure if 2 rowdy colts will drive her nuts - LOL.

    And yes, if I could magically find a buyer for my colt, as well as the 2 young mares that are for sale, that would be the perfect situation. However, it is not always that easy. Not like you can just take them to Wal Mart and get them sold! :-)



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Posts
    356

    Default

    I had two colts at the same time and I don't think I'd do it again. They play and they play HARD. So I was always cleaning up bites, cuts and scrapes. Not to mention fixing the property damage. All they could think about was each other and playing. My gelding thought everything was a big giant game for a while. He's on his best behaviour with me now, but for a while there he was pretty rude. He still occassionally approaches other horses like they might want to play with him, so he gets beat up quite often. He's 7 now, so not like he's still a baby.
    If I could do it again he'd be put in with an older mare or gelding that will tolerate him but also discipline him. Ideally his pasturemate would teach him some respect and make my job easier. Unless I had a huge acreage and he could have a colt buddy in with the rest of the herd to keep them in line I think I'd pass.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness