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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default Safest 'attractive' electric fence

    So I will need electric fence for my track system-at least for awhile until I decided whether to do something more permanent.

    I don't want white.

    I have black 4 board fence and would like something that blends in-so black or brown is my best guess.

    I have NO idea where to start-all these tapes and t-posts.

    Lost.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,477

    Default

    For electric fencing, I don't think you can beat Horseguard for quality. They have brown, green, and white, but not black. I do think there are some companies that do black, but have no experience with that product. I've been happy with the Horseguard - I've used it for my interior paddock cross fencing, and it looks great with my brown Centaur perimeter. I have the Horseguard brown t-post covers -- again, I'm sure I've seen another company makes black in those too, but no experience with it.

    How temporary is this going to be? T-posts aren't fun to take out and move, esp if you have a lot of them.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,464

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    I have NO idea where to start-all these tapes and t-posts.

    Lost.
    I start in a corner and go from there.

    IME with "tape" fencing is that it can lacerate a horses limbs if they get a leg over it and then slide along the edge of the tape in a panic trying to pull their leg away.

    This is the only mishap I've encountered and it was a weanling that got lacerated. Vet stitched him up and he recovered just fine. Sort of a freak accident, but the edges of the tape do have the potential to cut flesh if things happen just right.

    I like the wade black plastic fence with the steel reinforcement bands. Seems to hold up well as long as it is installed correctly - starting in the corners.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,464

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by horsepoor View Post
    T-posts aren't fun to take out and move, esp if you have a lot of them.
    There is a special jack made for removing T-posts. Just hook on and push down on the lever. They pop right out of the ground. No wiggling needed.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Electrobraid comes in black.

    http://www.electrobraid.com/enlarge.html
    Click here before you buy.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    37,146

    Default

    Horseguard, Horseguard, Horseguard.

    Do NOT use tposts, I swear I will come down there and smack you! If you DO use them, to make them anywhere near safe you need to fully enclose them with sleeves and a cap, and then you might as well have paid for wood posts.

    I have had Rio get tangled in the HG fence twice. I mean TANGLED. He ran, the tape broke before he did. he broke a few of the insulators and a metal tensioner along the way. Those are easy and cheap to replace.

    Horseguard has really nice fiberglass posts that are fantastic for temp fences. I use them all the time for temp fencing. They're a bitch to get into hard ground, I'll give you that. But otherwise I wouldn't trade them for anything. YOu'll just need a t-post driver, like this, and will want to handle them with gloves, especially for pulling them out.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2008
    Location
    Lexington Ky
    Posts
    325

    Default

    Horseguard
    they make a bi-polar tape that doesnt need a ground rod and still packs a wallop. I use it and LOVE it...horses totally respect it too.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Thanks...I guess Horseguard it is.

    Question-if you were just going to enclose an area as a paddock off of a shed, say 50x50 or something like that...

    Would you do Horseguard or permanent fence (as in wooden board)?

    Any drawbacks or benefits to either choice?

    I have just never used hot fence--so just not familiar with the benefits.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,953

    Default

    I'm using hot fence for the first time...finally had one line of electrobraid added to my fence across the top.
    It's really nothing tough, but I did have someone else do the ground rod and connection in case I messed it up. You do want the ground rod somewhere that the ground doesn't dry out very easy. A shady spot and/or one near a water source so you can resoak it if necessary.

    However, I only have one line and it's attached to big honkin' round posts. However, I also bought some step in things made for tape or braid and these little clamp things (huh, I should learn the names for these things, LOL) in case I want to fence off part of the small grass paddock. They work nicely, but I don't think they'd work as actual "keep the horse in" fence, they seem more of a cross fencing type.

    If I need a smaller area fenced temporarily, I use round pen panels. Not sure if you have any or if they're in the budget, but they do come in mighty handy as easily moveable temporary fencing. I've never set them up as an actual round pen, I bought the round pen set for temporary fence panels.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    I have more stupid questions.

    I am planning on using the Horseguard as a cross fence to make a dry lot around my shed.

    I like the look of the bi-polar. So I would just have a straight line of cross fence with a gait (I guess the bi-polar gate is best?).

    The idea then is the horse could be drylotted as needed then open the gait and he would be free to go onto the pasture or come back through the gait on to the gravel area and have access to the shed if weather was bad.

    SO

    1. If the gait is open, allowing access, would the fence still be hot? Or does unhooking the gate 'kill' the electrical?

    2. If the gate is open, would I actually just want the entire system off? It seems this would allow them to run through it or learn to press on it?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,953

    Default

    When you add a gate to an electric fenced paddock there's a wire run under the gate underground. So the fence still stays hot because the circuit isn't broken.
    A plastic coated wire is attached to the hot wire/tape and then run down the gate post on one side, a shallow trench is dug across to the other gate post and the plastic coated wire is buried and tamped into that. Then the wire runs back up the other post (doesn't need insulators on post because the wire is covered in plastic) and attaches to the hot fence on the other side.
    This way you can open and close gates all you want and never lose the electricity in the fence.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    I told you I had stupid questions!

    I guess the other option is just place the gate on on end or another as opposed to the middle.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    37,146

    Default

    What MB said.

    Any time you add a gate, you need to run a wire under the gate to connect each side. That keeps the fence hot whether the gate is open or closed.

    If you were to use the HG handles and tape as your gate, then when the gate is closed, the circuit is complete, but when it's open, it's only hot on whichever side your charger is on.

    You do not want a horse to learn the electricity is off

    Whether you use regular post and board, or the HG and wood posts, or the HG and fiberglass "temp" posts, is up to you. If this really is a permanent thing, maybe you want all wood to match the rest of your fencing.

    A 50x50 area isn't very big, which can cause issues, or have issues be resolved by, either type of fencing, really. Smaller areas are more likely to cause a horse to start chewing on boards, which can't be done with electric. Getting stupid in a small area could cause him to run into, or kick into, either type of fencing, and it's a matter of which you feel better about him connecting with.

    The HG brown tape, which is what I have, looks very similar to wooden fencing, other than being more narrow.

    Bipolar, or the regular, where you are it really doesn't matter. In the end it's the charger which matters.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    solar or electric? and why?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Location
    The Land of the Frozen
    Posts
    13,787

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post

    IME with "tape" fencing is that it can lacerate a horses limbs if they get a leg over it and then slide along the edge of the tape in a panic trying to pull their leg away.

    This is the only mishap I've encountered and it was a weanling that got lacerated. Vet stitched him up and he recovered just fine. Sort of a freak accident, but the edges of the tape do have the potential to cut flesh if things happen just right.

    I like the wade black plastic fence with the steel reinforcement bands. Seems to hold up well as long as it is installed correctly - starting in the corners.
    I would have never thought that could happen. We've had electric tape for - gosh - at least 14 years on this farm and have never seen a single injury because of it. I've seen horses run through it, roll under, get shoved through it, tangled up in it, jump over and not quite make it.

    Over the years we've raised babies, brought in rescues, boarded horses, etc. so there has always been a variety of temperaments, sizes, and ages coming and going. Honest to pete, I can't recall ONE injury from the white tape fencing. If they connect with a t-post, they can do some damage. We try to mitigate that by having caps on all posts. Would do the sleeves if we could afford it. http://www.hphoofcare.com/Andre%20And%20Mares2.jpg

    The top rail is at 54" and the 3 strands are 18" apart. Posts are 10 feet apart. Gates are 12 feet to accommodate the tractors. We measure all of them so they are consistent.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    37,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    solar or electric? and why?
    If you cannot effectively face a solar charger due South and have it charging all day long, you may not get the best charge. I know you have a lot of trees around, so you need to see which way straight South is. The bonus to solar is it doesn't matter if the electricity goes out Good solar chargers can hold a full charge, on a good battery, for at least 24 hours.

    OTOH, a good electric charger can put out a stronger charge than some solar chargers, so it really just comes down to what you need.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auventera Two View Post
    If they connect with a t-post, they can do some damage. We try to mitigate that by having caps on all posts. Would do the sleeves if we could afford it.
    Yeah, by the time you sleeve t-posts, you could have paid for wood posts.

    Just be really, really careful. Rio's first serious injury was sliding into the side of an un-sleeved t-post and severing his extensor tendon
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    South of the Mason-Dixon Line
    Posts
    2,321

    Default

    Another vote for Horseguard. All of our pastures are fenced and cross fenced in HG brown tape on stained wood posts. I think it is very attractive and blends well with the wood board perimeter fencing (stained the same brown). I have found that it holds up well to very high winds and heavy snow loads with minimal tightening needed. I have never had an injury from the tape and I have had horses try, believe me. They also have excellent customer service!
    Ridge Farm Inc.-full care retirement
    http://www.horseretirementfarm.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2004
    Location
    NW CT
    Posts
    837

    Default

    I'm a huge fan of Horsequard. I've had two occasions when it's come down. The first time it was because my goofball old TB had to fight over the fenceline. He got it wrapped around his leg but not a scratch on him. The other time, a 100' pine tree came down and they must have run through it. Both times, the horses were fine. A lot of dancing but not the slightest injury. And they stayed inside the area where the fence was.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2008
    Posts
    178

    Default Ditto on Horse Guard

    I fenced all of my dry paddocks with HorseGuard bipolar when the bipolar tape first came out. I use a Pharmak Magnum 12 (sp?) solar charger. Packs a wallop of a shock (unfortunately I have first hand knowledge.) The horses totally respect it. I too had a mare get a leg wrapped in the tape. She had barely a scratch, despite using her hind leg to break the tape!


    The fencing looks lovely. Really blends in nicely.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    My fencing is black 4 board fence-I assume the brown will 'blend' and look ok?

    I know they suggest 2 strands is enough-but will it look half complete having 2 strand connect to 4 board?

    Also I see Horseguard offers a solar charger-any experience with it?

    So what happens with several days of overcast skies? SOL?



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