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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
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    Default Would rebar work as a ground rod?

    For a temporary fence with a horse used to electric?
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  2. #2
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    Apr. 28, 2004
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    Saratoga Springs, NY
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    Default

    That's what I used, worked well, and I never had an issue.



  3. #3
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    Mar. 28, 2002
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    East of Dog River
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    Default

    That's fancier than MY ground rods - I used wagon rods (long 'bolts' that stabilised grain wagons, horse powered ones). T-posts work too.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  4. #4
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Default

    I'm pretty sure it only has to be metal and rod shaped. T-bar should work I would think.
    Or a t-post.
    Or a truck axel, but that would be a b*tch to bury I would think.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
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    New England
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    Default

    Absolutely!
    mykidshavefourlegs.blogspot.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    40,871

    Default

    That is all we have used for decades, sometimes along with the nearest steel post.
    You can use more than one ground rod, just run the wire along as many as you want.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2005
    Posts
    706

    Default

    The manager at my local co-op says rebar is not good because it rusts. Apparently it would affect the proper functioning of the fence.He advised that I get three 8 foot galvanized rods, put them in the ground at least six feet, ten feet apart and run a wire between them.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
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    Beyond the pale.
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    Default

    rebar and t posts both rust, but if you secure your ground wire to a sanded clean shiney part with a good tight hose clamp, and sink it sufficiently deep in the ground to where it makes contact with damp earth, it will work fine. Galvanizing also puts a coat on the metal like rust and it makes no more difference. I think your co-op manager had misplaced information or was trying to sell you a more expensive product.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2002
    Location
    Chesterton, IN US
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    Default

    For short term, it would work. But long term, I'd use the real ones due to the rust issue. If you're going to bother hammering them in that deep, learn from my mistake so you don't have to repeat the process because a poor ground is keeping you from having a safe hot fence.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2005
    Posts
    429

    Default Well?

    Had a fily that tried to jump out of a turnout...her back hock was impaled on the rebar. Not a pretty sight. IMHO I wouldn't use it.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2010
    Location
    Powder Springs, GA
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    138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Noodles View Post
    Had a fily that tried to jump out of a turnout...her back hock was impaled on the rebar. Not a pretty sight. IMHO I wouldn't use it.
    Errm... I don't think the OP is talking about using it as a fence post... just as a ground rod. That's what we're using at our temporary facility (wife's parents' farm) until we close on the new place. Long term I'd go with the galvanized, but rebar does work just fine. Ours has been in for a year and haven't had any issues at all. I used 3 rods of about 8 feet long each spaced out about 8 feet apart... all pounded to just below ground level and covered with dirt. The wire just disappears into the ground, right beside a fence post. Someone would have to be very talented to injure themselves on our setup.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    8,779

    Default

    Rebar has a couple of disadvantages as I see it:

    First, as noted, it rusts. That will reduce its conductivity and effectiveness as a grounding rod. Eventually it will disolve and that's that.

    Second, it bends. It's supposed to bend so that it can be effectively used in reinforcing concrete. I've not had much success with rebar short posts for this reason. Driving an 8-10 foot piece (necessary in some places to get to continuously damp ground) will be a challenge.

    Given that galvanized grounding rods are not all that expensive, are easy to work with, and reuseable I'd stick with them.

    G.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2005
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    429

    Default OOPS

    Opps, sorry!!!!! My bad



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CatOnLap View Post
    I think your co-op manager had misplaced information or was trying to sell you a more expensive product.
    Actually, I was trying to buy an expensive new charger and he talked me out of it.
    His view was that "properly" grounding the fence would improve it's functioning.



  15. #15
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Noodles View Post
    Had a fily that tried to jump out of a turnout...her back hock was impaled on the rebar. Not a pretty sight. IMHO I wouldn't use it.
    Does not really matter what material, she it's it it's gonna be ugly.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
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    Default

    Thanks for the answers - it is working just fine!
    I have copper rods for my permanent fence, but this is for temporary grazing paddocks and there is no way I would go 6 feet deep anyways... Seems to do the job.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



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