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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    1,377

    Default Who has to hold farriers hand? "oops, left a flair here", "he's still high on inside"

    Now, I don't see dead people, but I certainly can see balanced feet! I have always had quite the eye for details, balance, flair, toe length - all without gages and toe leveler (and then I back up my findings with exact measurements from gages and toe leveler). Am I alone?

    Do most people just not pay attention to details, not know better, or do they also have to give their farrier "guidance"?


    (I am probably not the typical horse owner: almost 40 yrs experience, farm owner, breeder, FEI rider).



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    3,585

    Default

    Between this and your other thread, if you're that unsatisfied with your farrier, then move on.

    Find one up to your standards *and* willing to work with you.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Posts
    260

    Default

    I feel the same way. If you are not satisfied with your farrier then switch. If I have an issue with one of my horse's feet I will discuss with my farrier but that is rare. He is the professional and takes pride in his work.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
    Location
    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
    Posts
    3,612

    Default

    I left one when it became clear that if I wanted my horse's feet trimmed properly, I was going to have to spell it out. I asked another of that farrier's clients what she did, as her horse's feet looked better than my mare's, and she said she had to tell him to keep her horse's toes short.

    I didn't think there was much point in paying the guy if I had to tell him how to do his job, so I found someone else. I don't have to tell her what to do; she knows her job. Mare is now very sound and moving very well, and her feet no longer look like bells.

    I think many people don't know what a balanced trim looks like. They're happy with farrier's work if horse stays sound and keeps his shoes on (for 8 weeks, or 12 weeks or whatever ).
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,898

    Default

    If you can see that and he can't, then he needs to go, and you need to either find someone who CAN see that and do the job, or do the job yourself
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Now you know why so many of us on here learned to trim

    I suggest you do the same, it will save you a lot of aggravation and when something goes wrong you can only blame yourself.

    You can then find a farrier who will shoe your trim if your horse needs shoes. Best of both worlds IMO.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    South Coast Plaza
    Posts
    20,465

    Default

    Oh gosh, for a minute I thought it was April 1.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    You can then find a farrier who will shoe your trim if your horse needs shoes. Best of both worlds IMO.
    If you mess up a trim, the horse can rebalance it for you. If your farrier is soooooo bad that you need to trim before he shoes, that's laughable. I can't imagine a farrier willing to shoe someone else's trim.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Yep! I hear you guys! Thanks for the confirmation! Now, will someone please check out my thread in Off Course about needing SALES help: http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=263083



    EqTrainer

    Now you know why so many of us on here learned to trim

    I suggest you do the same, it will save you a lot of aggravation and when something goes wrong you can only blame yourself.

    Bingo! Well, this is obviously part of my "problem"! I already DO trim, and have been doing so for about 8 yrs. I have also taught myself to shoe.
    I.
    Simply.
    Can't.
    Trim.
    17.
    Horses.
    Feet.
    By.
    Myself.


    This little body just can't do it all like it once could. (I like my back! )



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,499

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by citydog View Post
    Between this and your other thread, if you're that unsatisfied with your farrier, then move on.

    Find one up to your standards *and* willing to work with you.
    This!

    You obviously require a very special farrier. It might take you a while to find just the right one that can give you the service you require with that does the trim just the way you want it, but please do not torture every farrier trying to make them into that farrier.

    I just do not get (in this thread or your other one complaining about the exact same situation) why, if this farrier did this horrible of a job you did not notice and correct the situation while the farrier was still there. You say he did 17 horses. That is a lot of feet to be that bad and for someone who knows as much as you do to not say a word about it.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    If you mess up a trim, the horse can rebalance it for you. If your farrier is soooooo bad that you need to trim before he shoes, that's laughable. I can't imagine a farrier willing to shoe someone else's trim.

    Mine will. It's not that he's a bad farrier or trimmer, it's that he is a pretty ego-free guy who knows that since I trim my own that I am the person who knows the most about them and can them their best trim. Besides that he gets paid the same amount either way so in the end it's all the same to him...

    But mostly it's a nice thing, took a little thinking out of the box in the beginning but he always wants what is best for the horse.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    If you mess up a trim, the horse can rebalance it for you.
    Not always

    If your farrier is soooooo bad that you need to trim before he shoes, that's laughable. I can't imagine a farrier willing to shoe someone else's trim.
    Who said anything about the farrier being so bad he couldn't trim? If he WAS that bad at trimming, I sure wouldn't have him put shoes on.

    Maybe it's a matter of the trimmer not having the desire to learn to put shoes on
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,898

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fantastic View Post
    I.
    Simply.
    Can't.
    Trim.
    17.
    Horses.
    Feet.
    By.
    Myself.


    This little body just can't do it all like it once could. (I like my back! )
    How many are you trying to trim in the same day? How often do these feet need trimming?

    Trimming 3 every weekend would put everyone on roughly a 6 week schedule. Trimming 3 twice a week puts them on a 3-ish week schedule.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Location
    The Land of the Frozen
    Posts
    13,787

    Default

    Anybody can make a mistake, or sometimes when it's 1,000 degrees outside, you've been bent over with your head beneath your butt for 6 hours, and sweat is burning your eyeballs - you might not get something quite right. When I'm done with the trim, I stand back and look at all 4. I go back and tweak anything that needs tweaking. Sometimes the owner will ask about this or that, usually it's just my own desire for perfection that drives me to pick up the foot one more time and fix something I'm not quite happy with.

    I currently trim the horses of another trimmer who quit doing it because of her back. That was a bit scary at first but she's a great lady and we have fun together I also trimmed a Draft that belonged to a Farrier. He was injured and couldn't trim for a few months. Horse's feet were a disaster and needed shoeing so I did what I could and gave him a phone number. A farrier here asked me if I would trim his broodmares because he just doesn't have time. I never did because they're half wild and get done 2x a year and that's not the kind of work I want. I also trimmed horses for a lady who is Strasser trained and normally has a Strasser trimmer, but that trimmer hasn't been good about scheduling lately. She ended up not calling me back, presumably because I didn't take off enough foot for her liking. She had made comments about needing to cut out more of this or more of that, and I didn't want to do it. In another situation, I trimmed 2 Drafts then the owner had an Amish farrier nail shoes onto my trim. She said he's very good at shaping shoes and does hot fitting but his trimming skills are terrible. That was certainly an interesting situation for me!

    It seems fairly common to trim horses for somebody who knows how to trim, or is certified themselves. I would just be up front about your expectations and your knowledge.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    732

    Default

    I am looking for someone to trim for me. Is the op available?
    Eric Russell CJF



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    My patients (usually) don't tell me what tests to order, what meds to prescribe, or what decisions to make.

    I don't tell my farrier how to do his job.

    Both of us welcome questions intended to increase understanding and to clarify a game plan.

    If a practitioner does crappy work, don't continue to use their services. If you think you can do better, strap on the apron and have at it.
    Click here before you buy.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Posts
    619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post

    I don't tell my farrier how to do his job.
    This.

    I am lucky now that I have a GREAT farrier. However, in the past I've had pretty good (respected) farriers who would always leave the horse with the same flare. Weird. Still you can't tell a farrier how to do his job. Make a suggestion, have a discussion, but if it doesn't work out, then you need to come to terms. Either accept what you have or move on.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2009
    Posts
    1,842

    Default

    Now, I don't see dead people, but I certainly can see balanced feet! I have always had quite the eye for details, balance, flair, toe length - all without gages and toe leveler (and then I back up my findings with exact measurements from gages and toe leveler). Am I alone?
    No. A few other horse owners.trainers also try to tell their chosen professional how to do their job. If they pull hoof guages out with me, its the last time they will see me, since I recommend hoof guages are better used for paper weights.
    Do most people just not pay attention to details, not know better, or do they also have to give their farrier "guidance"?
    I am hired to give my horse owners guidance, not the other way around. As are all professional farriers.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
    www.hoofcareonline.com



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    I am hired to give my horse owners guidance, not the other way around. As are all professional farriers.
    So, if I don't give him guidance, does that make him and his work "professional"? Do professional farriers leave flair, high medial, and shoe to flair, or would you consider such a farrier to be unprofessional? (Sorry, just funnin'! I couldn't resist!).



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Trubandloki wrote:

    You obviously require a very special farrier.
    HUH? Since when is medial/lateral balance, matching angles, and flairs removed a "special" requirement in a farrier? Heck, that is just a good foundation of a job well done!!



    You say he did 17 horses. That is a lot of feet to be that bad and for someone who knows as much as you do to not say a word about it.
    Nowhere did I say that he did 17 horses! Nor did a "not say a word about it" with the ones that he did work on.



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