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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2008
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    Default Pony Eats Half a Bag of Grain - What Shoud Be Done?

    This is kind of a hypothetical question though a pony at the barn did eat half a bag of grain when she got loose last night. The owner is choosing a wait and see approach and I was just wondering what things could be done, other than calling the vet, to prevent possible problems, particularly colic and laminitis.

    I would figure that the first thing would be no grain for at least 24 hours but what about hay? Should the pony be hand walked, turned out or in the stall?

    Would it make sense to administer bute or banamine or ice the feet at this point?

    The pony is question is overweight and was on a restricted diet - no grain, just a ration balancer and two flakes of hay a day.



  2. #2
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    Jun. 24, 2010
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    West Michigan
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    Default

    Oh God... I don't think I'd take the wait and see on a pony that is already overweight and on a restricted diet. When you say 1/2 a bag....are we talking 25lbs of a 50lb bag?
    Concordia means "Harmony" in Latin.
    Full Time Dressage Addict



  3. #3
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    Feb. 19, 2004
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    New Hampshire
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    Wait and see??? That is horrible! I would have called the vet asap and been soaking feet.
    Missouri Fox Trotters-To ride one is to own one

    Standardbreds, so much more then a harness racing horse.



  4. #4
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    Jul. 22, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Concordia View Post
    Oh God... I don't think I'd take the wait and see on a pony that is already overweight and on a restricted diet. When you say 1/2 a bag....are we talking 25lbs of a 50lb bag?

    I agree with you but since it's not my pony there's not much I can do. I was told 1/2 a 50lb bag but that might have been a bit of an exaggeration. Either way it was a lot of grain.



  5. #5
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    May. 26, 2005
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    Default

    Call vet!!! Ice like mad!!!!Pray like crazy!!!



  6. #6
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    Jun. 24, 2010
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    West Michigan
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EAY View Post
    I agree with you but since it's not my pony there's not much I can do. I was told 1/2 a 50lb bag but that might have been a bit of an exaggeration. Either way it was a lot of grain.
    I realize that he's not yours so it's not your call Thats hard. But, if he WERE yours and you were the one who got to decide, in your hypothetical situation, that is what I would do
    Concordia means "Harmony" in Latin.
    Full Time Dressage Addict



  7. #7
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    Feb. 26, 2008
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    Michigan
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    Default

    yea, call the vet. they may want him started on Isoxsuprine, & Bute, and icing the feet.

    try to stop the inflammation, NOW.. it has probably already begun.

    take his vitals ASAP so you have a "baseline" (including digital pulse)

    Call your farrier, ASAP (just so he has a "heads-up) see what he recommends. you could duct tape styrofoam pads to his feet. get some cotton. wrap around the heel/cornet band, pastern. get some vet wrap, wrap the foot (with the pad on), then duct tape over that.

    lots of clean/fresh water, and grass hay only.

    no treats, grain, or anything high in sugar/carbs



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jumpin_Horses View Post
    and grass hay only.
    Not unless you know the NSCs of that hay and are soaking. Why do so many people think 'grass hay' is some sort of safe option in situations like this??



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2003
    Location
    Central Ohio
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    634

    Default

    Well, if the pony had been caught red-handed with nose in the bag, he COULD have had his stomach pumped and then be given oil to speed the rest of it through the system quicker. That is what I had to do with our IR pony who escaped from his stall in the wee hours of the morning, but was caught immediately. We managed to pump quite a bit of grain from his stomach. THEN, he was given Banamine, activated charcoal, and not fed ANYTHING but a few handfuls of his regular tested hay for the next day and checked constantly for heat or pulses in his feet. This pony is very sensitive to carbs, had eaten a good amount of Omolene 100, and he was none the worse for wear. But you have to get them in the first hour or 2 of eating the grain before it leaves the stomach.



  10. #10
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    Oct. 16, 2008
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    Central Oklahoma
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    Default

    OMG. If this were my pony, I would drag his ass to the vet immediately. I would not want to wait and see....



  11. #11
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    Oct. 25, 2007
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    Default

    I was told by my vet to give the full dose for horse's weight of oral banamine, same thing next day, next day drop to half, etc

    Banamine does something per the vet to help the gut flora...which is what happens when they overeat.

    I would at least call the vet and inquire as to what to do...what's wrong with some people!
    I am sorry you have to be a witness to such stupid and irresponsible behavior.



  12. #12
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    Feb. 26, 2008
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    Michigan
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jaimebaker View Post
    Not unless you know the NSCs of that hay and are soaking. Why do so many people think 'grass hay' is some sort of safe option in situations like this??
    if this is a "wait and see" person, I guess I just assumed they would not be bothered to take samples of their hay in for testing

    also, soaking hay has its problems too. once again, if this is a "wait and see" person, they probably WONT clean up uneaten hay, which will sit in the sun and MOLD... for the pony to eat later.

    so, part of the question was "what to feed?" surely NOT their 2nd cut alfalfa hay.. right? preferably "grass" if one had to choose.... it would probably be the BEST option for THIS situation

    I was putting myself in the OP position and offering the best advice for THIS situation, at THIS time... which would be "grass hay" period. (preferably on a dry lot)

    thanks



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2000
    Location
    CT
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    Default

    I hope you can at least talk them into Banamine and taking vitals. Doesnt sound good for the pony...

    When my horse got into a bag of grain overnight, the boarding stable didnt tell me and I didnt know until the following afternoon when he was back out on pasture

    First vet I called advised half dose of banamine, water only - no food for 24 hrs and watching for signs of founder. Unfortunately, he didnt advise me to watch his temperature. So as I was looking for laminitis, my horse was developing endotoxemia. By the time I took his temperature 8 hours after my initial assessment, it was 104. Even with banamine and IV fluids, we couldnt get it below 102 for another 24 hours. He never developed laminitis but nearly died from the endotoxemia from his grain overload. He was very sick and it was about 8 days before we were "out of the woods".



  14. #14
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    Aug. 5, 2006
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    I will never understand some people (referring to the people who own the pony) Why are people so cheap when it comes to getting their animals emergency medical attention? We're talking life/death....not a scratch.



  15. #15
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    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Vermont
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skyy View Post
    Call vet!!! Ice like mad!!!!Pray like crazy!!!
    Yep. "Wait and see" does no good here. The benefits of standing the horse in ice water for 24 hours are obtained by starting immediately after the incident; if you wait until symptoms appear it's too late to do much good.

    Poor pony. A call to the vet for advice doesn't cost.



  16. #16
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    Jul. 22, 2008
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    I saw the owner this evening - still hasn't called the vet. She seems to be satisfied that the pony is pooping normally and not showing any signs of colic. I did ask if she had considered bute, which I figured she would have on-hand, or icing the feet.

    Tomorrow I'll suggest she take her temperature.

    The pony is now confined to her stall with water and a small amount of hay.



  17. #17
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Default THIS !!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by skyy View Post
    Call vet!!! Ice like mad!!!!Pray like crazy!!!
    THIS ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EAY View Post
    This is kind of a hypothetical question though a pony at the barn did eat half a bag of grain when she got loose last night. The owner is choosing a wait and see approach and I was just wondering what things could be done, other than calling the vet, to prevent possible problems, particularly colic and laminitis.

    I would figure that the first thing would be no grain for at least 24 hours but what about hay? Should the pony be hand walked, turned out or in the stall?

    Would it make sense to administer bute or banamine or ice the feet at this point?

    The pony is question is overweight and was on a restricted diet - no grain, just a ration balancer and two flakes of hay a day.
    Calling the vet is not optional in these situations.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  19. #19
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    9,892

    Exclamation

    Good grief. Call the vet! Some vets used to administer mineral oil to interfere with the absorption of endotoxins, and help speed the grain through as well as administering banamine. The sooner the better.

    Having seen one wait and see in my life time-I was a bystander, on the scene way, way, way too late. And it was a ghastly scene.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
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    Default

    The saying goes that God looks after small children and idiots.
    Perhaps this will be a case of the latter. It doesn't seem fair, does it, when responsible horse owners do everything they can in these sorts of situations, often spending themselves into near-catastrophic debt, and they STILL lose.



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