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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2005
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    Default Perfect Prep

    Does it actually work?

    I have a young horse that get's frazzled at shows and doesn't pay attention to their job and forgets how to jump (leaps through the air, knee's down etc). If I work the horse down too much then they get sloppy with changes and hit rails.

    This horse doesn't have an extraordinary jumping technique, but does jump well enough most of the time and is scopey when on a good canter and paying attention to the rider.

    I would like to try something that will take the edge off until the horse gets used to showing.

    The horse shows jumpers so I don't think this would be cheating like those trying to get that quiet, quiet hunter performance. Does anyone think differently?



  2. #2
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    Feb. 17, 2009
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    Like Ace? Is that what your gearing towards?

    My opinion: You said the horse gets slopy on changes and hits rails when worked down too much correct? Welp, and take it for what it's worth here... learn to ride the tired horse!

    Work harder on your changes, ask him stronger for the change instead of assuming he is going to do it. Jump higher schooling jumps at home, then when he shows and gets tired, starts to tap rails, chances are he won't because it's a lower fence, he has clearance!

    I would rather ride the hotter, sloppier horse drug free. What are you teaching by drugging? Horse is not going to get a good ride, maybe you will (which is what your looking for) but in the long run it's not the correct thing to do.

    Ok what is perfect prep?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2009
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    Default

    I'd try it, we have a horse that never grew out of that stage at my barn so we use Calm & Cool on him, its only for schooling shows though so there's obviously no testing, and I believe the L Tryptophan in that tests, so if the same thing is in Perfect Prep and there's a chance you might get tested- don't use it. But if it's a small scale (or anything other then an A + really) then you should be fine to use it!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Readington, NJ
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    Default

    I have a feeling you are going to get some very strongly-held opinions in response to this one. I have seen a few threads on here where some have made the possibly valid point that if it's something that you're using to alter your horse's behavior, then it technically is a rules violation, even if it doesn't "test." I'm personally not qualified to give an opinion as to the legality of anything because I didn't write the rules and don't intepret them for a living.

    In response to your other question though, I do think it works. I don't use it on my horse but have seen it help other horses focus in the ring. Not necessarily make them quieter, just better able to focus on their jobs. Sounds like that might be helpful for your situation. There is a powder as well as the paste, the powder you give the night before and the paste the day of. Some people use both, some one or the other.

    Good luck with your horse, whatever you decide!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Default

    Perfect Prep can not test, it is a mixture of vitamins and minerals, substances found in all horses (all mammals in fact). http://www.perfectprepeq.com/perfect...gredients.aspx

    I use it only at multi-day shows but only at night to help my mare, who normally lives outside and will stall walk if confined for too long, relax. I put a low dose in her PM feed, after we are done showing. It allows her to relax and munch quietly on her hay. Last year at HITS she wore a track in her stall the first night before my trainer turned me on to the Perfect Prep. She is susceptable to this and Quietex, but have had other horses not respond.

    No need for it during the day when we have classes.

    Try it it at home first to see how she reacts.



  6. #6
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    Sep. 26, 2007
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    246

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    I used it for the first time last month when the farrier came. It worked beautifully. My horse stood perfectly still when the previous time she was TERRIBLE....rearing, striking out....I could not believe how much different she was. Even the farrier was amazed and is going to try it. I ordered another tube and am expecting it to come tomorrow in fact, I want to keep it on hand, (I got the PP Extreme by the way) for a local show if we decide to go at the last minute. My horse gets very nervous at shows and I think it's fine (for the type of small shows that we go to) to give her something that will calm her down and make her more safe to ride and so that she is safe around other horses. It has nothing to do with her training, she is a hot TB, always has been and always will be. She has not been trailered and shown much and if there is a way I can help her cope more, then I'm all for it. I say give it i a try. I have also tried Calm and Cool paste and it was a total waste of money. We had to give it to her 4 hours before the show (so we had to go to the barn at 2 a.m.) and it didn't even touch her. We have that a few times and will never go back!



  7. #7
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    Dec. 5, 2004
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    For a horse that is frazzled and "leaps through the air" I don't think Perfect Prep will make a difference. Possibly at some of the doses people at horse shows use it can take the edge off an already reasonably quiet and prepared horse. I think of it as a turkey or a glass of hot milk. Supposed to relax and make sleepy and maybe so if I am on the beach under an umbrella, but when I fly (which I hate) a bit of turkey is not going to make a dent in my anxiety


    Maybe a placebo effect on the rider thinking its going to help and being more relaxed herself though.



  8. #8
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    Feb. 14, 2008
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    326

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ozone View Post
    Like Ace? Is that what your gearing towards?

    My opinion: You said the horse gets slopy on changes and hits rails when worked down too much correct? Welp, and take it for what it's worth here... learn to ride the tired horse!

    Work harder on your changes, ask him stronger for the change instead of assuming he is going to do it. Jump higher schooling jumps at home, then when he shows and gets tired, starts to tap rails, chances are he won't because it's a lower fence, he has clearance!

    I would rather ride the hotter, sloppier horse drug free. What are you teaching by drugging? Horse is not going to get a good ride, maybe you will (which is what your looking for) but in the long run it's not the correct thing to do.

    Ok what is perfect prep?
    Um, perfect prep is not an ace type drug. It's closer to a supplement.



  9. #9
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    Feb. 18, 2003
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    Alberta
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Motion View Post
    Does it actually work?

    The horse shows jumpers so I don't think this would be cheating like those trying to get that quiet, quiet hunter performance. Does anyone think differently?
    Can't answer if it works because my horse doesn't need it! But in answer to the bottom question: it doesn't matter if you're showing hunters or jumpers, they test BOTH! and drugging is drugging! So yes I feel differently! A jumper should still be rideable and adjustable on course. Just because it's not a hunter doesn't mean you don't want a nice, smooth rythmic round. The only difference is you have more technical courses with tighter turns. You should still RIDE the same for both. That's the main problem...people think jumpers can just run around like loony tunes when in-reality we can't...it's dangerous and stupid!

    Ok, rant over!
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  10. #10
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    Nov. 26, 2007
    Location
    Rhode Island
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    Default

    I would use it at home before trying it at a show...I've known a few horses to have adverse reactions. One was NOT a stopper, had a dose at home to try before using it at a show and she was literally RUNNING backwards from the jumps and was all sorts of worked up and out of wack. That was the one thing that had changed in her daily routine. The next day, after it had left her system, she was back to normal.
    Then there are some horses it won't even touch. It really is a case by case basis.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 11, 2006
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    Perfect Prep of any other "calmer" is not going to take the place of mileage, which sounds like what is needed here. Just because something doesn't "test" does not make it legal. ANYTHING given with the express intent of altering the horses mood or behavior is "illegal".
    Ridge Farm Inc.-full care retirement
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  12. #12
    Slow Motion is offline Training Level
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozone View Post
    Like Ace? Is that what your gearing towards?

    My opinion: You said the horse gets slopy on changes and hits rails when worked down too much correct? Welp, and take it for what it's worth here... learn to ride the tired horse!

    Work harder on your changes, ask him stronger for the change instead of assuming he is going to do it. Jump higher schooling jumps at home, then when he shows and gets tired, starts to tap rails, chances are he won't because it's a lower fence, he has clearance!

    I would rather ride the hotter, sloppier horse drug free. What are you teaching by drugging? Horse is not going to get a good ride, maybe you will (which is what your looking for) but in the long run it's not the correct thing to do.

    Ok what is perfect prep?
    I'm not looking for anything like Ace. I'm not looking for anything to make the horse quieter. Just something to make the horse pay attention to the rider, and the work that is being asked of it.

    Even if the horse is schooled and worked down to a point where the body is over tired the brain is not. Maybe said horse isn't ever going to be a show horse, some horses can't.


    Quote Originally Posted by theoldgreymare View Post
    Perfect Prep of any other "calmer" is not going to take the place of mileage, which sounds like what is needed here. Just because something doesn't "test" does not make it legal. ANYTHING given with the express intent of altering the horses mood or behavior is "illegal".
    So people feeding B1 hoping for a good change in the horse behavior are doing something illegal?

    I just want the horse to have a few more positive experiences and see what happens from there. Horse isn't showing for ribbons, just experience.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 27, 2003
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    CA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Motion View Post
    So people feeding B1 hoping for a good change in the horse behavior are doing something illegal?
    Sigh. Yes and No. B1 fed for the express purpose to calm is illegal. B1 fed to address a dietary deficiency is legal. It's pretty easy to say that any B1 that is giving a calming effect is really being given to address a dietary deficiency since that is the only time it has the calming effect.

    Things like Perfect Prep are not given to address dietary deficiencies...they are given to alter the mood of the horse and therefore are illegal, testable or not.

    I just want the horse to have a few more positive experiences and see what happens from there. Horse isn't showing for ribbons, just experience.
    If it's not about the ribbons, why would you need to use a calmer? If it's really not about ribbons, it's about mileage. There's nothing like show miles to settle a distracted horse. One that won't settle with the miles just doesn't want to be a show horse. Take the horse as many places as you can...the more distracting the better. Get it some miles and I'm betting you won't be asking about Perfect Prep.

    (FWIW: I was going to sell a horse for this reason. I couldn't get him the miles needed for him to be a good show horse. I have a series of pictures of me falling off because he was looking outside the arena and didn't see a jump, stopped and then deer leaped over it. :teehee: Thankfully, I happened across another solution (pasture life) and he's now so easy to deal with.)
    Last edited by RugBug; Jun. 24, 2010 at 04:39 PM.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  14. #14
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    Feb. 18, 2003
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    Even if you are only going for experiance, you can still be drug tested and if there is a substance within the supplement that is banned you will still pay the consequences! Be careful what you put in & on your horse....thoroughly check it out. I believe there has been postings before on what you are and aren't allowed and the ingrediants should be listed on the product. If in doubt....don't use it! Better to be safe than sorry and just stay home and school instead! I'd hate to see a post saying for us all to be careful as you'd learnt the hard way that you'd fed a banned substance in error!

    And as Rugbug said: substances given to alter moods are NOT legal!
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  15. #15
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Default

    I don't show, so I don't really care about legal or not-
    So to answer the OP's original question- yes, it works quite well on some horses. You would have to try it to see if it works on your guy.
    Personally I am a big fan of Smart Calm Ultra. I have a young Anglo-Arab gelding that I am starting. He has focus issue no matter how much work he is in and will wear himself thin (literally) in his pasture even though he has free choice hay. On the Smart Calm Ultra, he is a much happier horse that can actually keep weight on.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  16. #16
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    Mar. 23, 2009
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    Paddle faster! I hear banjo music...
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    I believe that the OP asked if Perfect Prep worked not whether or not it was legal in your opinions or not.

    I've had success with the Perfect Prep paste. However, I have also had success with Calm and Cool and Quietex. Perfect Prep paste is difficult to give in my opinion, especially if it is 30 degrees and you have small hands. Both Calm and Cool and Quietex are less to give by volume which helps me significantly. My trainer prefers Perfect Prep though. Frankly as a rider I don't notice a difference. (shrugs)
    I have fed Perfect Prep powder to several horses and seen no effect. And it's terribly expensive.
    "ronnie was the gifted one, victor was the brilliant intellect, and i [GM], well, i am the plodder."



  17. #17
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    May. 22, 2009
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    This may be a snarky comment but... Humans taking supplements or medications to alter mood is fine and acceptable thus why not for horse? Horses suffer from anxiety when going to strange places just like humans can. Very acceptable for humans to take something to 'take the edge off' ( even a glass of wine, or herbal remedy) and it just fine. Why not for horses so that they can have a good experience if they are nervous? They are not unemotional rocks, I do believe they have moods and basic insticts/emotions.

    Anyhow - my western friends have used perfect prep on young, skittish green-beans and they are quite happy with it. One friend used it to get her guy, who was terrified of a certian arena and was very hard for him to have a good experience there no matter what she did. used perfect prep only once, he could focus in that arena and never had to use it again. Horse happy.

    Out of curiosity, I tried it on my super hot, super sensitive, super grumpy, instantly- in- heat mare when around other horses one day since she had to stand at the trailer for most of the day. She is not a patient horse. She stood quiet, no fuss, and very sweet the entire day. No bitchy- grump -grump at others which is her norm. It was lovely. After that, her patience at the trailer improved and she has been much better since without any type of supplement.



  18. #18
    Slow Motion is offline Training Level
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    If it's not about the ribbons, why would you need to use a calmer? If it's really not about ribbons, it's about mileage. There's nothing like show miles to settle a distracted horse. One that won't settle with the miles just doesn't want to be a show horse. Take the horse as many places as you can...the more distracting the better. Get it some miles and I'm betting you won't be asking about Perfect Prep.
    I have spent nearly $8k this year already on showing. Going places just isn't working. My pro rider has basically given up on the horse and this is my last idea.

    Anyone that has owned horses knows that what works with some doesn't always work with others. They are all different.



  19. #19
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    I think I understand the issue you are having. My mare, prior to her vision loss, was such a calm horse but if she did get anxious, she was difficult to talk down, on the ground or under saddle.

    If I was having her get wrapped up like that at shows I would ask to go unjudged and use the perfect prep. I would tell the Stewart at the local united schooling show what you were doing, and I'm sure a local one would be okay if you were going unjudged.

    If you had this cleared, you could use other calming items if it did not work. But if you got ribbons out of it? I can see where one would get upset.

    If you can't find a situation like that, call around local barns with wild loud courses and trailer over until it is No Big Deal. Good luck, Casey was rarely like that and a good girl for trailering out to new scary places but I can understand how unsafe it could be and how frustrating.



  20. #20
    Slow Motion is offline Training Level
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    Trailering to places all the time would be an option except it doesn't bother the horse at all. The problem is the busy atmosphere of shows.



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