The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 82
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Tiki-- if your tranny fluid smells burnt, that might be you problem. 150K to 200K is about what you get. So don't begrudge it a new tranny if it's asking at 190K. But do be prepared to drop some money in for that. I got so many miles from mine because Jaspers are great (and expensive) and because I drive like a Reasonable Person especially when hauling.

    Jaegermonster-- look for the male end of a 3-pronged plug in behind your front grille in the 7.3L PSD. That's where you plug in the engine block heater... (in Florida!). A long extension cord will work, but they lose juice over length so if you are serious, you need to buy a 16-gauge bad boy.
    That's what I'm telling you, there is nothing to plug in on my truck for an engine heater. It has a built in heater with a sensor and it automatically comes on at a certain temperature. It was an option that came with the truck.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    No, as a matter of fact, I don't know stuff about fuel bowls and CPS yet. (On the to-do list)

    In fact, I don't even know where those things are on this engine.

    I
    For example, do y'all know that the turbo engines have two (2!) alternators? One can punt and you can still run. Apparently Ford needed more electricity and also reliability for ambulances which were powered by the PSD engine. They could build one big alternator or create juice plus reliability by building two. You can see the top one; the other is buried deeper.

    OK. But do you care?

    two alternators and two batteries, which can get a little pricey when battery time rolls around.
    The "water bowl thingy" is where your fuel filter goes, and on my truck it's right on the top easy to get to. Just make sure when you take the filter out to dump the water that you put all the gaskets back in carefully and put the filter back in carefully or it will leak diesel fuel and stink like hell. If you have the owners manual with your truck it will tell you where everything is.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,556

    Default That's whack

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    That's what I'm telling you, there is nothing to plug in on my truck for an engine heater. It has a built in heater with a sensor and it automatically comes on at a certain temperature. It was an option that came with the truck.
    Or else Ford knew it was shipping this one to FL and made this modification. I knew that engine block heating was a standard bit of equipment on trucks shipped to some states. Perhaps they don't change the whole engine but just this little "rat tail" and all it a day.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,495

    Default

    Now that I don't know. My first and third trucks had the plug in kind, but of course I never had to use it. The second truck had nothing. But this one came with the built in heater right off the lot. This year we really needed it, it was pretty cold down here, and it was nice not to have to mess with the cord and all that in the cold on hunt mornings.
    This truck was exactly what I wanted and even matched my trailer so one extra option I didn't care about at the time was no biggie, but this past winter it was nice to have, esp when I went to Virginia in Feb during the blizzard
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    My mechanic told me that all Ford diesels have the block heater but that not all have the wire to plug it in.

    I believe that he meant that all 7.3's and later have it.

    I think we are getting heaters mixed up with heaters.

    A block heater is an option that you pay for, or at least you pay for the cord to plug it in.

    A fuel heater is standard. All that does is heat the fuel so that it does not jell in cold weather. And there is nothing to plug in. The truck is its power source.

    A block heater must have an external power source because it must generate a lot of heat. Think of a cal rod in your oven.

    Or the one in your bucket for washing tack and that it must put out enough to heat that huge engine's block with all of its cast iron, oil and the water that is in the block.

    There is also a lot of conversation about block heaters. Depending on the year model, trucks will start at varying temperatures without it.

    On the 2008 the book says something like don't bother using the block heater above ???? 10 degrees maybe. I forgot.

    My experience with the 7.3 was that you had better plug it in when the temps are going to be below 18 or so.

    Obviously not required with a brand new set of batteries, but in the real world by the time you run the glow plugs, and the 7.3 glows forever when it is really cold, and crank a few times with old batteries, your battery gives up.

    Besides, really cold engines are not good things even if they start up with no pain.

    The cylinder is just that. A piston is a plug in a cylinder. When the engine is REALLY cold, the cylinder shrinks more than the piston and they do not have the same fit, the oil is not doing its thing and you have excessive wear on the cylinders until things warm up.

    So block heat keeps all of these bad things from happening plus you get heat much quicker in the truck interior.

    The 2008 glow plugs do their thing in a blink and it starts really quick, like a fuel injected gas engine.

    Even so, I plug mine in when it is cold.

    I also use Shell Rotella 15 40 oil. That is the only oil for a diesel.

    Stop in at any major truck stop and look on the oil counter. You will see that it is by far the preferred oil for the big trucks.

    There is a lot of nonsense about oil and the auto manufacturers are as guilty as anyone.

    Unless your are using your truck under extremely dirty conditions, like lots of miles on dirt roads, etc., the harder you use your truck the less you need to change oil.

    Reason is that driving 10,000 miles a year means that there are lots of short trips and lots of days of no use.

    Short trips and long shut downs means condensate in the oil.

    In other words, water.

    Lots of driving, say 40,000 or more and especially if that is highway miles boils out any condensate from the preceding night's shutdown.

    With all past diesels, and I had one the first year Ford sold them, my target was to change every 5,000 and in the real world I ran over to the 7,000 and 7,500 mark many times.

    The 2008 allows 10,000 and I follow that pretty close.

    So regular use and religious filter changes are more important.

    The truck will run better and last longer if you use it every day.

    It is also important to remember that the turbo gets hot hot hot like you would not believe.

    In ordinary driving, you can ignore it. But if you are driving on the interstate at 70 MPH, especially if you are pulling horses, and pull into a rest stop or filling station, you should not shut it down the instant you stop. Let the engine idle for several minutes.

    If you shut it down hot, the oil in the turbo cokes. When you crank the engine again, the bearings in the turbo are dry for a few seconds but at umpteen thousand RPM's, that is all it takes to ruin it.

    Ordinary driving, ignore that. Ordinary= like driving to a hunt pulling horses. Drive fast. Turbo hot. But by the time you pull off the main road and drive a mile or two down a secondary road, pull into the farm road and park the trailer, you have operated at reduced power long enough that it is as cool as it will ever be.

    3 trucks ago, I sold my used one to a neighbor. It snowed. His parking area is steep, he got stuck. He lost his temper and spun and spun and huffed and puffed and got mad, shut it down, jumped out and went into the house mad.

    When he cranked it next, turbo blew.

    CSSJR



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,556

    Default CPS change for you Fordist dieselers

    Just a little FYI. An article on how to do this is here:

    http://www.ford-trucks.com/article/i...ke_Diesel.html

    You might want to print out that pup and keep it in your glove box with the part and tools.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,413

    Default

    Hmmmm, I don't know about all the diesels having block heaters. I have hunted and hunted on mine, with the help of the ford-trucks.com guys and have never been able to find it. If anyone knows of any further tips on locating it -- I have scoured that puppy with a flashlight and much shimmying and it sure would be helpful in the winter, so I don't have to cycle the glow plugs three times and listen to the romps on cold starts.



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    6,637

    Default

    It took me a while to find mine. It is between the front grill and the radiator and it took quite a bit of feeling around to find the pigtail, but it is there - on mine.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,495

    Default

    They don't all have block heaters. It's an option. You can get the plug in or kind or you can upgrade further and get the one like I have on my truck that has a sensor and doesn't need to be plugged in.
    They may automatically put it on trucks that are being sold up north, but it is an option.
    Whether they are still putting them on current trucks i have no idea, my turck is an 02.
    I actually looked at the window sticker from my current truck (I still have it in the glove box) and it is a separate option in the upgraded package on my truck. It is not a fuel heater it is a block heater. Someone had special ordered it and never picked it up, so it has lots of special stuff on it.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    They don't all have block heaters. It's an option. You can get the plug in or kind or you can upgrade further and get the one like I have on my truck that has a sensor and doesn't need to be plugged in.
    They may automatically put it on trucks that are being sold up north, but it is an option.
    Whether they are still putting them on current trucks i have no idea, my turck is an 02.
    I actually looked at the window sticker from my current truck (I still have it in the glove box) and it is a separate option in the upgraded package on my truck. It is not a fuel heater it is a block heater. Someone had special ordered it and never picked it up, so it has lots of special stuff on it.


    So where does it get the 1000w to power the heater?


    All dodges have the heater, it is just a matter of getting the connector with a plug so you can plug it into a wall socket.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    They don't all have block heaters. It's an option. You can get the plug in or kind or you can upgrade further and get the one like I have on my truck that has a sensor and doesn't need to be plugged in.
    They may automatically put it on trucks that are being sold up north, but it is an option.
    Whether they are still putting them on current trucks i have no idea, my turck is an 02.
    I actually looked at the window sticker from my current truck (I still have it in the glove box) and it is a separate option in the upgraded package on my truck. It is not a fuel heater it is a block heater. Someone had special ordered it and never picked it up, so it has lots of special stuff on it.
    Maybe you misunderstood what I posted.

    All of them after a certain model, 1999 or 2000, have the heater. Not all of them have the cord and plug.

    I am certain that I understood my mechanic to tell me that.

    He is a top notch mechanic, regularly goes to Ford school and is good enough that he does Ford warranty for more than the dealer for whom he works.

    Like for all of the Thomas Bus engines, for instance.

    For all of the EMC's engines in two counties, etc.

    You do onot have a block heater that does not have to be plugged in.

    I think they take about 1200 watts. Your batteries would be dead in a very short time.

    As big as the Ford diesel engine is, it takes a couple of hours to heat it on a really cold moring. How long, I don't really know.

    I plug mine into a timer set to start at 5:30 AM, as I normally don't leave until 8:30 or so.

    I don't have the formula, but I can tell you that your batteries would not run a 1200 watt cal rod for more than a half hour or so and still crank the engine.

    Maybe an electrical engineer can chine in and give us the actual numbers.

    But to make an example, your headlights are more than likely 85 watts on high beam and 55 on low.

    You have two. How long on a cold night are you willing to leave your lights on and go to the house?

    CSSJR



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Sounds like you've got it right CSSJR. As far as i know, all diesels come with the heater in the block. It is a matter of obtaining the plug and cord, to make it useful.


    This is just an example of what you need to get a block heater, there is no other way to run a 1000w heater beside plugging it in to something.


    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Dodge...s#ht_500wt_975



    Good call on the timer CSSJR, sounds like you have a perfect setup. though i like to plug my truck in even when its not super cold, just because it heats up SIGNIFICANTLY faster when it has been plugged in. (ie much better for the engine, and you in the cab )


    OH and i think it is not that easy of a physics problem unless you know the rating of your batter in amps/hr. cold cranking amps only tell you what it can supply for a short time. if you knew amps, you could multiply amps x volts and get watts then figure how long a batter would last powering a 1000w heater....ok im done!



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,085

    Default

    Just an FYI: If someone is looking at buying a new Diesel pickup truck or one of the upcoming 2011 models, the auto makers are going to be selling and requiring Diesel Exhaust Fluid to be used in in their diesel pickup trucks to tame the emissions. Mr. Chief2 runs an auto parts store that serves mostly mechanics. He says this fluid will be required in the trucks (he initially thought it was a joke, then found out he will be stocking it), is put into the engine near the windshield wash canister under the hood, has a limited shelf life, and will be required to be added into the engine every 5000 miles or the truck will not run. When the truck runs low, you get a warning light. Then once the fluid falls too low, the vehicle slows to 6 miles an hour, and then stops. Essentially, this will tie you to the dealer for your oil changes as the schedules are run in tandem. I've added a link to explain what is happening here. Chevy is already on board with this, and the stock is coming into the store. Ford and Dodge will also be on board.

    http://green.autoblog.com/2009/03/10...exhaust-fluid/



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,495

    Default

    Not here to argue with people who have never been anywhere near my truck about what it does or doesn't have. Glad you found a good mechanic, there's more than one on the planet and I have one too. Y'all carry on.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    Not here to argue with people who have never been anywhere near my truck about what it does or doesn't have. Glad you found a good mechanic, there's more than one on the planet and I have one too. Y'all carry on.
    I suggest a little reading material for you:

    http://www.forddoctorsdts.com/articl...icle-05-20.php

    From Ford's tech manual.
    CSSJR



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chief2 View Post
    Just an FYI: If someone is looking at buying a new Diesel pickup truck or one of the upcoming 2011 models, the auto makers are going to be selling and requiring Diesel Exhaust Fluid to be used in in their diesel pickup trucks to tame the emissions. Mr. Chief2 runs an auto parts store that serves mostly mechanics. He says this fluid will be required in the trucks (he initially thought it was a joke, then found out he will be stocking it), is put into the engine near the windshield wash canister under the hood, has a limited shelf life, and will be required to be added into the engine every 5000 miles or the truck will not run. When the truck runs low, you get a warning light. Then once the fluid falls too low, the vehicle slows to 6 miles an hour, and then stops. Essentially, this will tie you to the dealer for your oil changes as the schedules are run in tandem. I've added a link to explain what is happening here. Chevy is already on board with this, and the stock is coming into the store. Ford and Dodge will also be on board.

    http://green.autoblog.com/2009/03/10...exhaust-fluid/


    I don't have a 2011. Mine is a 2008, but I was in the dealer's today and looked a a 2011 and talked to my mechanic about them.

    It is my understanding that the urea additive will last about 7,500 miles. But even at 5,000 it would not be a problem other than just one more thing.

    Actually even the big trucks are going to be forced to use it. I did a little search the other night and saw that some, not all, of the big truck stops are already installing a pump where you pump the urea into your truck and the cost is calculated just as fuel is.

    My understanding is that it is about $3.00 a gallon.

    Anyway, this is not a Ford weird idea. It will be required of all diesels and Ford has chosen to bite the bullet and get into it before it becomes mandatory.

    This what I THINK I have learned. I do not state it as absolute fact.

    CSSJR



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    Not here to argue with people who have never been anywhere near my truck about what it does or doesn't have. Glad you found a good mechanic, there's more than one on the planet and I have one too. Y'all carry on.


    Self help thread on a diesel forum, but reading through it will be beneficial.

    http://www.powerstrokenation.com/for...ead.php?t=2222

    This is the only automatic self powered heater on your truck.

    And I don't have to see it to know that.

    CSSJR



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Well, on the subject of DEF injection, Dodge does NOT need that. Another reason why dodge is better than the rest... Instead they use a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) to control emissions in combination with a special catalyst.




    Jaeger, I wouldnt be arguing with CSSJR.... It is mechanically/electrically impossible to have what you say you have without an external power source.
    Last edited by weasel1088; Aug. 26, 2010 at 12:55 AM.



  19. #59
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by weasel1088 View Post
    Well, on the subject of DEF injection, Dodge does NOT need that. Another reason why dodge is better than the rest... Instead they use a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) to control emissions in combination with a special catalyst.




    Jaeger, I wouldnt be arguing with CSSJR.... It is mechanically/electrically impossible to have what you say you have without an external power source.

    My understanding is that Dodge will be forced by the government to use DEF injection.

    Ford has Diesel Particulate Filter on the 2008, '09 and '10.

    Here is a link to a long discusstion on a Cummins user board.

    http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/20...on-2010-a.html

    This is another good link by a manufacturer of DEF, but it is more general.

    http://www.spatcodef.com/

    Left margin: "Download this White Paper" gives you a PDF that is interesting.

    So by the first link a quick read leads one to believe that some Dodges have DEF on present models and that all will probably have it shortly.

    Not knowing much about Dodges, I state nothing about them as a fact.

    CSSJR



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by weasel1088 View Post
    Well, on the subject of DEF injection, Dodge does NOT need that. Another reason why dodge is better than the rest... Instead they use a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) to control emissions in combination with a special catalyst.




    Jaeger, I wouldnt be arguing with CSSJR.... It is mechanically/electrically impossible to have what you say you have without an external power source.
    My memory was rusty about headlight wattage.

    More than likely jaeger has 70 watt headlights.

    I have seen 1000 watt and 1200 watts as the number for the block heater.

    Lets assume 1000 to be conservative.

    That would be equal to 14 headlights on bright beam.

    So put a light bar on your truck, mount 14 headlights on it and turn them on without operating the engine.

    Let me know how long the battery lasts.

    CSSJR



Similar Threads

  1. anyone here with a tricked out diesel truck?
    By suz in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Sep. 28, 2012, 12:28 AM
  2. High Milage Diesel Truck - Would you buy?
    By PoohLP in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: Jun. 13, 2012, 03:49 AM
  3. Difference between farm diesel and regular diesel?
    By mlranchtx in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Apr. 4, 2010, 05:50 PM
  4. Need Diesel Truck Help Near Poughkeepsie, NY
    By JanWeber in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Jan. 14, 2010, 10:27 PM
  5. Gas in the diesel truck
    By NMK in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Aug. 1, 2009, 11:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness