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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2006
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    NY/VT
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    Default TB Mare conformation critique?

    She's a 2001 TB mare that does the jumpers (up to 3'6ish currently, hoping to move up). Considering my options with her for the future and would love to know if anyone sees anything glaringly wrong conformationally that I'm missing that I wouldn't want to pass on to a foal. Or an idea of her strengths and weaknesses at least...

    She's 16.1, very petite build. Sire - Hunting Hard (http://www.freewebs.com/indianastall...untinghard.htm), Dam - Bewareth (by Caveat)

    Photos:
    http://s771.photobucket.com/albums/x...rent=conf5.jpg
    http://s771.photobucket.com/albums/x...rent=conf4.jpg
    http://s771.photobucket.com/albums/x...rent=Conf2.jpg

    Thanks!!!
    ILOVERMONT



  2. #2
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    Aug. 13, 2009
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    656

    Default

    I would look to a stallion with a short back and more of an upright fellow since your mare looks a bit long in the back and a bit downhill. Is she behind at the knee or is it just the angle of one of the pics? Her neck ties in a hair low which on a jumper may make it harder for them to lift their front end, again a more upright stallion may help.



  3. #3
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    Oct. 25, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by everafterfarm View Post
    I would look to a stallion with a short back and more of an upright fellow since your mare looks a bit long in the back and a bit downhill. Is she behind at the knee or is it just the angle of one of the pics? Her neck ties in a hair low which on a jumper may make it harder for them to lift their front end, again a more upright stallion may help.
    I don't think she's behind at the knee, she wasn't the most cooperative for the photo session, so I'm guessing a bad angle.

    Agree, I think I would be looking for a short back and more upright stallion, thanks for your thoughts!
    ILOVERMONT



  4. #4
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    Apr. 13, 2005
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    I'm not sure how much shorter you will get through the back without loosing power...I'd look for something that wouldn't add length to the back, has a solid loin, and will provide depth through the flank (not wasp-waisted). I'd stay away from any downhill stallions, any with a very strait stifle & shoulder, and with too much flesh in the throatlatch (last but not least).

    Off the top, I'd say a stallion such as Baron Van Gough at Rainbow Equus would be worth a look - and what a hoof that boy has!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2009
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    Default

    Nice enough mare. She looks a little straight in the shoulder for my liking - this may mean she doesn't have a huge stride and may find it difficult to snap her legs up high when jumping. I agree, one photo definitely makes her seem back at the knee.

    I'm well used to breeding from TBs so the length of back is not a shocker for me but I too would steer away from any stallion with too much length. I think she could do with more depth in her body - she's a bit tubular - especially more depth through her chest.

    She has a decent length of hip and her butt is stuck on her body ok.

    I would choose a short-coupled stallion with a thickset body and highish set neck. She is very fine but choosing a chunky legged stallion to compensate doesn't always produce what you might hope for! Instead look for a nice short cannon and long forearm.

    Have fun choosing!
    Last edited by Kerole; Jun. 17, 2010 at 06:10 PM. Reason: bad bad spelling - too early not enough coffee.



  6. #6
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    Jun. 16, 2007
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    I agree with Goodmorning and Kerole, over all her parts are fine but I would work on how they are attached. Fortunately warmbloods work very hard to have harmonious horses so you would find horses with lovely toplines to smooth her out. To me her topline is her weakest feature and that is asthetic rather than bad conformation but that can make it difficult if she is strong as everyone likes a smooth topline. If your desire is to produce a jumper I agree that depth of body is a trait that is found in jumpers. It gives that big loose swing to the upper arm. PatO



  7. #7
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    Oct. 25, 2006
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    Thanks for all the comments. Very helpful stuff!
    ILOVERMONT



  8. #8
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    Nov. 6, 2008
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    Just wondering...was your photographer tall? May account for some of the long look in proportion to length of leg, as it almost looks as if some of the pics were taken looking a bit downward.
    Her sire certainly doesn't look long in the back, though his photo is taken from the rear, which would shorten the look.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 25, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by selah View Post
    Just wondering...was your photographer tall? May account for some of the long look in proportion to length of leg, as it almost looks as if some of the pics were taken looking a bit downward.
    Her sire certainly doesn't look long in the back, though his photo is taken from the rear, which would shorten the look.
    My BF and I both used my blackberry to take the pictures, so the angle might change slightly depending on which of us took each pic, but neither of us are really tall...5'6 and 5'10ish.
    ILOVERMONT



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