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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2007
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    1,803

    Default Soaking Big Foot...Big Foot abcess

    For those with big footed horses. I have a 6" x 7" foot and most pre-made soaking boots and pre-made wraps are too small. What have you Big Foot owners found that makes treating abcessed feet easier. Thanks PatO



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
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    8,108

    Default

    How about just standing the horse in a bucket?
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2007
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    Default

    Cute...not what I was looking for. May be what I have to do but hoping there is a neat foot soaking device that doesnt require me standing there...then an neat poltice holding device that doesn't require miles of duct tape...all sized for LAAARGE feet. Thanks though. PatO



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2006
    Posts
    111

    Default

    There is a great article #10476 on www.thehorse.com.( If you are unfamiliar it a vet based website) regarding treating abscesses. Basically, the thinking is not to soak but rather to use poltice (Animalintex is a medicated pad that you would soak and apply to the sole and use a "boot" that you would make out of duct tape (I highly recommend using Gorilla Tape). I have also heard of making a "boot" out of a diaper. This way you are not softening the hoof and possibly doing more damage than good.

    At least with this approach you will have a "custom" boot for treating his abscess.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
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    3,348

    Default

    I agree with songsmom. I use Animalintex pads for abscesses. I soak it in very warm sugardine first to increase their effectiveness. for a big horse, get the sheet and not the precut hoof shaped pads.

    I hold them on using vet wrap and duct tape.

    I have had clients use diapers for holding in a poultice, but I prefer the pads.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2006
    Location
    Larkspur, Colo.
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    4,708

    Default

    Get thee to the REI and get a dry bag. They come in all shapes and sizes. I have two and they work great for soaking. Cost about $20.

    Something like this.

    http://www.rei.com/product/784157

    You can also use an old inner tube and may find one free from a tire shop.

    I also like to poultice versus soak, but since using Clean-Trax I don't know if I'll bother with anything else. It only required one soak.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    35,232

    Default

    Or (not sure if this is what The Horse link has, didn't look) get a diaper (probably bigger than the standard newborn recommendation) and fill it with epsom sales, a little betadine, hot water, and wrap it up around the foot with duct tape. Add a criss-cross pattern of DT around the bottom for durability.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2007
    Posts
    1,803

    Default Thanks

    I will try the dry bag. I have a mare with hoof wall like iron and if the foot is not soaked the painful pre breakout part of the abcessing process goes on forever and makes a much larger hole when it finally comes out the top of the hoof wall. I do use Animalintex as well. I do appreciate Gorilla Tape and will DEFINATELY use it for the duct tape process since I am not going to find a large enough temperary boot no matter how much I whine. I have a once or twice yearly abcessing horse due to a varus foot and then this is my second big horse wth some kind of foot issue that needs a boot. This IS my first abcess after discovering Gorilla Tape so that in itself may help tons. Thanks PatO



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2007
    Location
    The Whinnery.
    Posts
    785

    Default

    You can't stand with your horse while his hoof soaks? Pull up a stool, sit be with your horse and appriciate the time for what it is!

    You won’t have it forever!!!
    "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,447

    Default

    Davis makes some MASSIVE soaking boots that look like buckets. I have a bunch. If you want one, just pay the shipping. Pm me.
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2007
    Posts
    1,803

    Default Sure can.

    Sure, can stand while she soaks, and do. One person farm here, many things to do and a full time job and a couple soaks a day. Small foot horses have nifty boots you can put on and get on to other things like weed wacking and mowing and shed mucking and more weed wacking and mowing. The mare likes it better too...follow along...helping...with a big sloshy boot I hope. It can take a week for this to work out the top. Perhaps you were imagining my watching Days sipping Mimosas eating Bon Bons while my girl soaked by her lonesome...multitasking here! PatO



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2008
    Posts
    961

    Default

    PatO...your not the only one with a large hoof that you have to soak! AND a 37 acre farm to run as well...that is my job. Though in the summer I am saving one drunk at a time as I am an EMT...anyway...When I got my Percheron mare from TX last July, she popped not one but 3 abscess's!! One on either front and one in the right back and it was due to how danged short my friends farrier trimmed her prior to her being shipped to me...when I saw her hooves I about cried.

    So, as someone said, pull up a stool, sit there or stand and brush the mare while she soaks. What is 20 min to a half hour out of your day? I do sympathize with you though...and good luck.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    246

    Default

    Ask your vet for some used 5 liter IV bags. A lot of clinics keep them around for just that purpose. You just put your soaking solution in the bag, put the hoof in, and tape onto the leg. Tie the horse up so that it can't move around too much and the bag will last for a few soaks before it wears out. You won't have to babysit like you do with a bucket because the horse can't slosh your soak out.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
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    9,541

    Default

    I used the Giddyap Girls soaking boot on the last abscess with decent success, tho I didn't use it as suggested. The claim is that you can somehow velcro it around the horse's leg so it moves with the horse. I loaned it to a friend to use a few months back and it didn't work as well as billed. A lot of water sloshed out and eventually the horse stepped on it with his other foot, causing a flood of both liquid material and not-so-nice words. I essentially used it as a floppy bucket by rolling down the sides to it was a fairly uniform height all the way around. It was still tall enough that the liquid level was easily above the coronet band. It stayed decently warm. The horse was less upset than he is about buckets (perhaps b/c another soaking episode ended not well when he somehow got his food between bucket and handle). The advantage of it over some of the other containers is that there is a disk at the bottom that seems to be pretty hoof (even with shoe) proof and the flexibility made it easier to keep his other foot from stepping on it.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
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    9,942

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Or (not sure if this is what The Horse link has, didn't look) get a diaper (probably bigger than the standard newborn recommendation) and fill it with epsom sales, a little betadine, hot water, and wrap it up around the foot with duct tape. Add a criss-cross pattern of DT around the bottom for durability.
    This is the easiest, a soaking bandage. The only thing I do differently is submerge the bandaged hoof in the warm water AFTER all the taping is done. Dunk the hoof in water a few times during the day to keep it moist.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
    Location
    Home of "The Office", PA
    Posts
    879

    Default

    Need a big foot diaper(probably bigger than even you need)...get good ole Depends. As awful as this may sound, my family bought a house in the neighborhood that had belonged to an elderly woman before she passed away. The family cleaned out the house before we got the keys, but they left a nice 1/2 pack of Depends in the bathroom closet. Those could cover a draft horse foot! We took them to the barn in case we even needed huge bandages.
    The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,249

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lindsay_aggie View Post
    Ask your vet for some used 5 liter IV bags. A lot of clinics keep them around for just that purpose. You just put your soaking solution in the bag, put the hoof in, and tape onto the leg. Tie the horse up so that it can't move around too much and the bag will last for a few soaks before it wears out. You won't have to babysit like you do with a bucket because the horse can't slosh your soak out.
    This. And yes, diapers for bandages, sealed by a duct tape star. Place 4x4 gauze squares on one half of the diaper along with your chosen goop: betadine, epsom salt, or ichthalmol, etc. Position diaper on foot, secure tabs over the horse's heal, then keep in place by putting the duct tape star over the sole, and arranging the 'fingers' of the star over the wall & heel, etc. A few more feet of duct tape encircling the foot and you're good to go.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2007
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    The Whinnery.
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    785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JackieBlue View Post
    Davis makes some MASSIVE soaking boots that look like buckets. I have a bunch. If you want one, just pay the shipping. Pm me.
    I've seen the draft size at Bartville! They are bucket sized

    The OP just needs to get out&about.
    "Dressage" is just a fancy word for flatwork



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2001
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    413

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    get a diaper (probably bigger than the standard newborn recommendation) and fill it with epsom sales, a little betadine, hot water, and wrap it up around the foot with duct tape. Add a criss-cross pattern of DT around the bottom for durability.
    I used exactly this method to soak my mare's foot. I bought the store brand toddler size. It worked very well.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    Hot tub and then for a poultice just use animalintex poultice wrap and duct tape the whole lot in place.

    But you can buy poultice boots that big you know.

    http://www.yourhorse.co.uk/Gear-revi...poultice-boot/

    Or this sort which is altogether easy peasy and dirt cheap!

    http://www.yourhorse.co.uk/Gear-revi...poultice-boot/

    http://www.hyperdrug.co.uk/Hoof-It-P...uctinfo/HOOFL/

    http://www.equinecompare.co.uk/equestrianProducts.php



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