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  1. #1
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    Jan. 26, 2010
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    Default Walk Me Through Loose Fetlocks and Windswept

    I have a super vet who is really good at this and sending pictures to her friend, who is one of the top equine orthopedists in the country, and I've been reading all over, but tell me your experiences.

    Super fill born Saturday night. She had very loose ligaments in the hind legs, almost touching fetlocks to the ground. She stood right away no problem. She also was windswept. Initially she was going both ways, but settled to mostly in one direction. I guess the ligaments are pretty common and straighten out, and windswept seems to be from getting squooshed in the womb. She''s a big girl at 115 pounds.

    She seems a bit better each day. Today at four days old, it's still slowly better. She's got limited exercise as directed. She can move around in the big stall and certainly does a lot. She had about 15 minutes in a small turnout yesterday, and 30 minutes today. Mom seems to know what to do and she walks the baby in both directions, but doesn't run off. Baby is VERY energetic and wants to run.

    I'm assuming she'll straighten out. Orthopedist says it's not such a worry in warmbloods as they usually do. I was just watching her today and those ankles sort of swinging sideways as she moved and wondering if it's setting the bones already and how she'll need careful trims to straighten it out.

    Please tell me your experiences with this and what you did. How long did it take?



  2. #2
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Default

    Foal aid or rejuvenaide asap. That stuff works miracles.



  3. #3
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    Default

    I gave Foal Aid when she was born just because I had it, not because she needed it. Why would that help loose ligaments?



  4. #4
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    Apr. 6, 2005
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    Default I have had a couple

    One filly several years ago...very, very windswept, almost stood sideways on her fetlocks. Smaller mare, big foal like yours. We restricted her to stall rest per Vet advice, had my farrier come out and "trimed" her...consisted of very light rasping ever few days. Took several weeks but corrected 100% by if I remember about one month old.
    My first foal years ago, a huge filly was walking on her fetlocks an hour after birth. Scary. She corrected really quickly though. She was pretty 'up' on her pasterns by a week old, by two weeks was on full turn out with the other mares and foals. Went on to a hunter/jumper career.
    So time usually fixes the problem with careful monitoring by Vet and a good farrier.
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  5. #5
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    Oct. 29, 1999
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    Default

    We have totally ignored (normal care & turnout) the ones we have had, and within a week to a month or so they are all perfect. I do watch them, and if I thought they were getting sore, or not improving, I would change the turnout time.

    My foals for the first week go out about 30 - 60 minutes twice a day, then all day or night.



  6. #6
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    Fairview--Really? I'm always afraid I'm not conservative enough, so this makes me feel better. So I won't fuss if I don't see 100% improvement by the end of the week. Thank you



  7. #7
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    May. 25, 2009
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    Default

    I just had a filly born the same way and she is now 4 days old. She has gotten much better but does look loose side to side to me as well. My vet hasn't been too concerned and thinks it will be fine but I have been giving foal-aide as well. It's a little unnerving when they come out and go to stand and you see that!! It took her longer to figure it out but she is pretty strong now and starting to straighten up.



  8. #8
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    The worst windswept one I have had placed 3rd at Dressage at Devon at exactly 3 months of age. He was out very quickly full (half) time, as his mom will not tolerate private turnout. She just frantically trots up and down the fence until you let her out with the others. With her, you know you have to make a decision, as they are going to get hurt if she is not with the group. Safer with the group. I put her with another mare for her very first turnout after foaling.

    I have to add to that though that my horses don't tend to run around much when introduced. They eat and walk.



  9. #9
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    I gave Foal Aid when she was born just because I had it, not because she needed it. Why would that help loose ligaments?
    Don't know how it works, I just know that is does work. Generally makes a huge difference in a matter of days. You give it every day though, not just once. I keep them on the oral version until they are reliably eating the equivalent amount of the pellets.



  10. #10
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    Default

    Does anyone know anything more specific about Foal Aid to help tighten up loose ligaments? I've never heard of this. Would this be similar to giving Grow Colt or something as supplements? I thought it was just something to give at birth to boost them just in case colostrum is low.

    Fairview--Hm. This mare's last two foals (mine) were up and running from the start. I don't think they come with an understanding of the concept of walk and eat. This girl still had her hind legs in mom and had her head up and was trying to stand. Her two year old sister got up, nursed, and ran in a circle around mom for two hours before she decided to take a nap. Mom got really dizzy following her. Even Miss Wobbly here is bouncing and moving and doing little gallops in circles in the stall. Mom seems to get that she shouldn't be running too much, though, and just walks with her and tries to call her back if she takes off. (SUCH a good mom.)



  11. #11
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    How early does everyone start Rejuvenaide? It says 5 days on the tube, but I'm wondering if it would be okay to give it sooner? I have one right now who might benefit. She's not bad, but needs to tighten up a bit.
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  12. #12
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    Apr. 4, 2006
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    Foal Aide is a paste vit and min supp with some calories too. They also make a liquid for later on down the line for easy keepers. I also use it on my foals starting at 5 days of age for about a month. Then I start using the liquid about once or twice a week as my foals eat their pellets but as they are on grass full time, they won't eat the recommended amount nor even close.

    Terri
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  13. #13
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    I was told 5 days of age by the folks at Progressive just this week. They have a fan page on facebook where they have a Q&A section. They have always been very prompt to respond to questions.



  14. #14
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    I would just discuss with your vet whether you should take a picture of her knee/and or hock to make sure the cubodial bones are not soft and if so to splint her. They can collapsed causing a permanent condition. Rare but can happen.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    Fairview--Hm. This mare's last two foals (mine) were up and running from the start. I don't think they come with an understanding of the concept of walk and eat. This girl still had her hind legs in mom and had her head up and was trying to stand. Her two year old sister got up, nursed, and ran in a circle around mom for two hours before she decided to take a nap. Mom got really dizzy following her. Even Miss Wobbly here is bouncing and moving and doing little gallops in circles in the stall. Mom seems to get that she shouldn't be running too much, though, and just walks with her and tries to call her back if she takes off. (SUCH a good mom.)
    I was talking about the mares not running the foals, just walking and eating. The foals always do run around, but they do what they are comfortable with, not trying to keep up with a mom that is more concerned with stretching her onw legs. It sounds like your mare is being perfect.



  16. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    This mare's last two foals (mine) were up and running from the start. I don't think they come with an understanding of the concept of walk and eat. This girl still had her hind legs in mom and had her head up and was trying to stand. Her two year old sister got up, nursed, and ran in a circle around mom for two hours before she decided to take a nap. Mom got really dizzy following her. Even Miss Wobbly here is bouncing and moving and doing little gallops in circles in the stall. Mom seems to get that she shouldn't be running too much, though, and just walks with her and tries to call her back if she takes off. (SUCH a good mom.)
    I think this is key in management -- knowing your horse(s). The whole idea of space/turn-out restriction is to not put abnormal stress on an abnormal joint. Normal stress on an abnormal joint is the goal, with slow strengthening, because the cause is simply weakness of the ligament, not a "real" physical malformation.

    So if you have horses that are calm and will just stroll around on a flat, level surface, I think they can take more turn-out time then those that tear around like little speedsters up hill and down dale. If they are profoundly out of alignment, they are more apt to do damage. I had one rupture her extensor tendon -- she was severely contracted and she got to bucking so hard in play she ruptured her tendon and had to spend 6 weeks in a cast...THAT was fun

    But my last foal who was alittle wonky was very calm, as was her mom, so I gave them more turn-out than the vet had recommended. This foal has afew issues, and most were resolved 90% by 6 months.

    But it takes time.

    It has generally been my experience that loose ligaments resolved quicker and without issue as contractures and such, however I did have one poor colt who was a mess -- windswept one way in the front and another way in the back and he never did improve, despite several trips to the vet and various attempts to help him.

    He was put down at 5 weeks. That was the most extreme case I have ever experienced and it was a real heart-breaker.

    Good luck with your little filly. I think the right track is to just monitor her closely. Change DOES take time.



  17. #17
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Don't know how it works, I just know that is does work. Generally makes a huge difference in a matter of days. You give it every day though, not just once. I keep them on the oral version until they are reliably eating the equivalent amount of the pellets.
    Just curious - have any studies been done to show that it's the Rejuvenaide actually doing the fixing, vs just the "matter of days" fixing things despite the Rejuvenaide?
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  18. #18
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    We just had one ourselves who was very badly windswept in all four but worse at the back. In fact he couldn't even get up and down by himself to nurse for the first 24 hours. We kept him stalled for 4 days and then only turned him out in a small area for as long as it took to clean the stall for another couple of days and then slowly increased the turnout to 1/2 day...just so long as he was getting plenty of down time while outside and his Mom was not moving him around too much and then the full day.

    You wouldn't believe the difference in him in a week. You can hardly notice it at all now. After a couple of weeks my farrier was able to level off his hoof a little as he has worn the edge down on the outside and he was a little long in the toe and that also helped to get him back upright.

    I think people have different views on turn out. I personally have a hard time putting them out when they can hardly stand and their hind end is going every which way. The good thing is that they really come around quickly and for sure supplements like Foal Aid and Rejunaide seem to make a difference AND there is no long lasting effect.
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  19. #19
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    Oct. 29, 1999
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    It is also a matter of which risk and how much. Keeping a mare in for days after foaling can increase her likelihood of becoming infected, foundering, etc. Nothing is clear and simple. Each decision has risks, and you have to weigh all to make the best decision for your situation.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Just curious - have any studies been done to show that it's the Rejuvenaide actually doing the fixing, vs just the "matter of days" fixing things despite the Rejuvenaide?

    The folks at Progressive are very nice and helpful.
    It was explained to me as a nutritional supplement...just because the mare gets a balanced diet, does not mean it gets passed on to the foal.

    I think sometimes it would be nature fixing the problem, but if the problem is due to a nutritional imbalance... then the Rejuvenaide would be a great help. I think specifics are available on the Progressive website. A main problem with foal nutrition is calcium/phosphorus ratio. When that gets out of whack--there are lots of problems.
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