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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2009
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    57

    Question Can anyone suggest a good barefoot trimming how-to book or video?

    Who here does their own trimming?

    I don't plan on getting rid of my professional farrier/trimmer, but I'd like to have the option of nipping and rasping a bit to help with upkeep in between trimmings, and hopefully help them be able to go a little longer in between trimmings as well. Can anyone recommend a good how-to book or video?

    I'm pretty comfortable with the idea of using the rasp, and even the nippers. I'm more nervous when it comes to using the hoof knife and trimming the frog and bars.
    Last edited by Bay&Gray; Jun. 14, 2010 at 08:27 PM. Reason: .



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
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    3,503

    Default

    10 Secrets to Healthy Hooves

    www.barefoottrim.com
    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,951

    Default

    www.barefoothorse.com

    Forget about nippers You won't need them for anything "touch up" you'd be doing between regular visits
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2009
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    488

    Default

    Anything by Pete Ramey or Jamie Jackson.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
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    3,447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mjmvet View Post
    Anything by Pete Ramey or Jamie Jackson.
    They've been eclipsed by Gwenyth Browning Jones Santagate, Leading Expert, Pioneer Natural Hoofcare Provider



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bay&Gray View Post
    I don't plan on getting rid of my professional farrier/trimmer, but I'd like to have the option of nipping and rasping a bit to help with upkeep in between trimmings, and hopefully help them be able to go a little longer in between trimmings as well.
    Why do you want to go longer between trimmings? Have you discussed this with your professional? Why doesn't s/he show you how to do it? I actually don't know why any farrier would agree to this, this is a real sticky liability problem waiting to happen if something should go wrong.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2006
    Location
    Ft. Collins, CO
    Posts
    793

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bay&Gray View Post
    Who here does their own trimming?

    I don't plan on getting rid of my professional farrier/trimmer, but I'd like to have the option of nipping and rasping a bit to help with upkeep in between trimmings, and hopefully help them be able to go a little longer in between trimmings as well. Can anyone recommend a good how-to book or video?

    I'm pretty comfortable with the idea of using the rasp, and even the nippers. I'm more nervous when it comes to using the hoof knife and trimming the frog and bars.
    Pete Ramey's DVD series Under the Horse. Can't beat it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2009
    Posts
    57

    Default

    The reason I want to go longer in between trimmings is because right now I am only able to go 3 or 4 weeks. I'm not really happy with my farrier. I've tried all the ones in my area, and he seems to be the best of the worst. I've just noticed that when he comes, he never seems to be able to balance properly, i.e. even I can see stuff like that the horse is longer on the inside or outside, etc. I've mentioned it to him before, and he usually tries harder, but he just seems very inconsistent.

    Basically, I'd like to get to the point where I can trim my horses myself, and maybe have a farrier come behind me every couple of months.

    I don't really see how he would be liable for anything should something go wrong. Especially if I'm not asking to learn from him. I mean I don't think he would be liable if I just decided to go 4 months without trimming and let them crack and flare.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    3,447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Androcles View Post
    Why do you want to go longer between trimmings?
    We are in the midst of an economic recovery. (latest buzz word for "recession.")

    Have you discussed this with your professional? Why doesn't s/he show you how to do it?
    Time is money. See above. Maybe reading a book and watching a few videos is more economical than paid hands-on instruction. Heck the book (10 secrets) costs less than a trim. AND there's plenty of FREE "how to" videos on U-Tube.

    I actually don't know why any farrier would agree to this, this is a real sticky liability problem waiting to happen if something should go wrong.
    Where is the liability is showing somebody how to work a rasp?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bay&Gray View Post
    The reason I want to go longer in between trimmings is because right now I am only able to go 3 or 4 weeks. I'm not really happy with my farrier. I've tried all the ones in my area, and he seems to be the best of the worst.
    Sounds like you are in an area that will not support a high quality farrier business. Simple economics and demographics.

    I've just noticed that when he comes, he never seems to be able to balance properly, i.e. even I can see stuff like that the horse is longer on the inside or outside, etc. I've mentioned it to him before, and he usually tries harder, but he just seems very inconsistent.
    If you only have one horse not many farriers are going to be interested in working for you. Again it is simple economics.

    Basically, I'd like to get to the point where I can trim my horses myself, and maybe have a farrier come behind me every couple of months.
    If you can't find a farrier whose work you like, why bother having one check your work? If you can see that things could be better, then all you need to learn is how to use the tools then make it better yourself.

    You can learn the rudimentary basics of trimming (tool use) in a weekend hands-on course. If you area is lacking in skilled farriers/trimmers, learning to do it yourself is probably a sensible option. Certainly more economical than paying somebody with better skill to drive several hours each way to trim one horse.

    There are a good number of trimmers who took up trimming their own, then wound up with a trimming business, because they could not get good farrier service in their local area to tend their personal horses.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
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    1,833

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post
    Where is the liability is showing somebody how to work a rasp?
    Famous last words.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2009
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    1,863

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    Althouh I do respect Pete Ramey,he tries to make rocket science out of somehing that is much more simple than that. And charges accordingly. His dvd set is WAYYY too complicated and I often find myself helping trimmers who have gotten really confused from them.
    I recommend the Natural Balance Trimming DVD from Equine Digit Support Syetems inc. About 35 bucks and you will have good basic information you need for what you want to do.
    Last edited by Patty Stiller; Jun. 15, 2010 at 01:02 AM.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
    www.hoofcareonline.com



  13. #13
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Default

    Better off spending some time in beautiful Colorado getting hands-on instruction.



  14. #14
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    Feb. 21, 2009
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    Thank you Tom
    October in Colorado can be pretty and I still have openings for that one ....
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
    www.hoofcareonline.com



  15. #15
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    Mar. 24, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Stiller View Post
    Althouh I do respect Pete Ramey,he tries to make rocket science out of somehing that is much more simple than that.
    The better to sound like the man behind the curtain.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Stiller View Post
    Thank you Tom
    October in Colorado can be pretty and I still have openings for that one ....
    October . . . in CO? Brrrrrrrrr.



  17. #17
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Larkspur, Colo.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer, CF, RJF View Post
    October . . . in CO? Brrrrrrrrr.
    You could say the same for June. Rain and 43 degrees here all weekend...

    Then again, we have more than 300 days of sunshine a year, and lots of T-shirt weather through November.

    And Patty is a really good teacher.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    nj
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    Thumbs up trimming from the top DVD by sole sisters.

    you can buy it through solesisterproductions.com, here is the link

    http://solesisterproductions.com/
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarkspurCO View Post
    And Patty is a really good teacher.
    I wouldn't recommend a teacher that didn't have (a) class(s).



  20. #20
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    Sep. 25, 2005
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    The Land of the Frozen
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    Lately I have been seeing some Pete Ramey trimming that is terrifying. Apparently he is now teaching to remove all the wall at the ground level so the horse is walking on its soles. I've seen this here and there when I've trimmed behind Ramey type trimmers. Their owners have said their trimmer was trying to get the horse on its soles because the sole is supposed to bear all the weight. When the horse goes lame from it, then the owner is told to put down pea gravel, or to soak the feet in water, or to ride the horse more. It's a real cluster fudge if I've ever seen one. So, while I do enjoy some of his articles, I quit recommending people to study his trimming style.



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