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  1. #1
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    Default Refresh my memory on breeding to EVA positive stallions please ...

    Ive just gone over to Kathy's website and most questions I have answered myself but just a couple more I am not 100% certain on ...

    1. The mare can either be vaccinated for it or simply inseminated with the EVA positive semen - correct? Either way she will harbor the EVA virus for the 21-28 day time frame and then it will die off with the lack of testosterone to sustain it?

    Is the only situation where you would specifically vaccinate her instead, is if you planned on breeding another mare on the property to an EVA positive stallion so you are trying to protect the OTHER mares on the property from aborting?

    And I gather every year the mares should be vaccinated? Or - is that only if you plan on breeding another mare on the property to an EVA positive stallion? In my case specifically, if all of my mares are being bred to my EVA negative stallion is there any reason to vaccinate them?

    2. How long can the virus live on your clothes? Boots? Body? If you visit a barn that has an EVA positive animal and you get sneezed on and you then come back to your barn 5 minutes / 30 minutes / 60 minutes / 2 hours later / etc are you then putting your animals at risk at all, or doesnt it travel or live that long to affect them at all?

    Thanks as always Kathy!



  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueColours View Post
    Ive just gone over to Kathy's website and most questions I have answered myself but just a couple more I am not 100% certain on ...

    1. The mare can either be vaccinated for it or simply inseminated with the EVA positive semen - correct? Either way she will harbor the EVA virus for the 21-28 day time frame and then it will die off with the lack of testosterone to sustain it?
    That's certainly not the route I would take. With the vaccine, while you want to quarantine for 21 days (for a mare), the risk of her passing the virus on to another animal is low. However, breeding with EVA positive semen means that the mare has the very real potential of passing the live virus on to another animal. If she were to inadvertently get loose or come into contact with say a pregnant mare, or a stallion that has not been vaccinated, the results could be catastrophic. Vaccinate before breeding.

    Is the only situation where you would specifically vaccinate her instead, is if you planned on breeding another mare on the property to an EVA positive stallion so you are trying to protect the OTHER mares on the property from aborting?
    See above. Attempting to "innoculate" a mare by breeding her with semen that contains the virus, you are in essence, giving the mare the disease. There is always the risk that she may come in contact inadvertently with another animal and even if that animal is not a pregnant mare, that animal has the potential of coming into contact with another animal and so on and so on and so on. It is why if you are thinking about breeding to an EVA positive stallion, if the mare has never been exposed or vaccinated - vaccinate.

    And I gather every year the mares should be vaccinated? Or - is that only if you plan on breeding another mare on the property to an EVA positive stallion? In my case specifically, if all of my mares are being bred to my EVA negative stallion is there any reason to vaccinate them?
    It depends on your risk of exposure. Once vaccinated, you can simply vaccinate annually if you are going to breed, or have their titer levels checked to see if they are sufficient.

    2. How long can the virus live on your clothes? Boots? Body? If you visit a barn that has an EVA positive animal and you get sneezed on and you then come back to your barn 5 minutes / 30 minutes / 60 minutes / 2 hours later / etc are you then putting your animals at risk at all, or doesnt it travel or live that long to affect them at all?
    The virus is very short lived and not particularly hardy. But, if you are dealing with an animal that "is" positive, you want to take appropriate precautions to avoid the risk of transmitting it inadvertently to your own animals. Washing hands after touching animals at another facility is always a good practice, changing clothing if you KNOW you are dealing with a positive animal, and stepping in a footbath is a good idea, as well. Probably not necessary, but we tend to error on the side of caution. If we breed with EVA positive semen, all of the equipment that could potentially come in contact with the semen is disinfected, and all equipment used, if possible, is disposable.

    Hope that helps.
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  3. #3
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    Default

    I have a question on boosting previously vaccinated mares. Do those mares need to be isolated from herd when given the "booster" shot and if so for how long?

    Can you go over the time line on vaccinating a mare for EVA for the first time when she has a foal at side from a negative EVA stallion? And how long should mare and foal be isolated from rest of mares and foals?



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljshorses View Post
    I have a question on boosting previously vaccinated mares. Do those mares need to be isolated from herd when given the "booster" shot and if so for how long?
    No need to isolate or quarantine when boosting vaccination.

    Can you go over the time line on vaccinating a mare for EVA for the first time when she has a foal at side from a negative EVA stallion? And how long should mare and foal be isolated from rest of mares and foals?[/QUOTE]

    There is a risk of sero-conversion with the foal, although that is less of risk than actually breeding the mare without vaccination. I'd have to look through my records on what the time line is for vaccinating a mare after foaling. I "believe" it was 2 to 3 weeks, but don't quote me on that. My brain leaks and I'm stuffed and it's late here. The mare and foal should be isolated for the requisite three weeks and again when the mare is bred, she should be isolated away from other mares for three weeks, as well.

    Hope that helps!
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  5. #5
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    Sorry Kathy - I forgot that you were "across the pond" and are 5-6 hours ahead of us and its REAL late there now!

    Attempting to "innoculate" a mare by breeding her with semen that contains the virus, you are in essence, giving the mare the disease. There is always the risk that she may come in contact inadvertently with another animal and even if that animal is not a pregnant mare, that animal has the potential of coming into contact with another animal and so on and so on and so on.
    So in this scenario, the danger isnt to the mare herself (as within that 21-28 day time frame if she contracts the virus through the semen, it will be gone in that time frame as she doesnt have the testosterone to support its continuation) but its to other horses that she may infect on the property or that handlers handling her may infect moving from one horse to another?

    Is that correct?



  6. #6
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    Oct. 28, 2007
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    Cool why bother

    there are tons of top quality stallions who are EVA negative. Why bother with one that is EVA positive. you must like Russian Roulette...



  7. #7
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    Aug. 17, 2009
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    New York
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    Default

    Thank-you for starting this thread! I am thinking about breeding to an EVA Positive stallion this year (yes, there are a lot of other options out there but this breeding is essentially free) and I keep forgetting to look up what I need to do to protect everyone.
    The mare I am breeding is maiden but I will have 1-2 pregnant mares on the property when she is bred and another that is open but will also be bred about the same time.
    Should I vaccinate them all or just the mare I am breeding? I am considering the same EVA Positive stallion for my other open mare in 2011 but she will be bred this year to an EVA negative stallion (a rebreed since she did not take this year)- should I vaccinate her now while she is open and then just booster her when it is appropriate next year?
    I know this will be at my vets discretion (who was also my boss for 5 years) but should I suggest we breed the mare who is to be inseminated with EVA Positive semen at my farm using our stocks? Most of the mares she breeds at her clinic but total quarantine might be difficult (she does not take in really sick or contagious horses because of this but refers them to the local Large Animal Hospital that is better set up for such things). She does a LOT of breeding in the spring. How dangerous is it for her other clients for my mare to be bred up there?
    Sorry for so many questions- I have a ton more on the basic vaccination protocol and when to start, etc but I'm sure I can look those up somewhere.
    Thanks!!



  8. #8
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    NorthHill Farm - I think the absolute tragedy in the industry is that very simply, a huge number of vets out there do not seem to be "up on" or "knowledgeable on" this and many also disseminate total false and damaging information as well through their total lack of knowledge ...

    Case in point

    My Faux Finish mare has been in PA for 2 1/2 - 3 years now. I live in Ontario, Canada and my stallion is at my facility here in Ontario and hasnt left the property for the last 2 years.
    Faux Finish was bred to an EVA positive stallion last year and so was her pasture mate - on the same day - in PA. They quarantined together in the same paddock and both are now 3 1/2 months away from foaling

    A VERY well known vet and breeder has gone onto several bulletin boards and slammed me for putting clients breeding to my stallion at risk of contracting EVA in their mares by either getting semen shipped from him or sending their mares to my farm to be live covered by him. Because I own a mare that was bred to an EVA positive stallion, even though she is a good 500-600 miles away from MY stallion and has been for the last 2 1/2-3 years ... ... and "my" property was now contaminated as a result ... by "her" ... even though she has never even set foot on this property yet (as the barn wasnt built before she left ...)

    Totally insane that I had to go public to defend my stallion against an "industry professionals" accusations as they should have simply known better, being in the veterinary industry and being a breeder to boot. And shame on them for NOT being "up" on issues that are affecting the veterinary and breeding industry in this day and age so that they can advise their clients correctly instead of spreading false information ...


    A friend of mine has her mares at a boarding barn here in Ontario. One of the mares there was bred to an EVA positive stallion in 2008 and foaled in 2009. ANOTHER stallion owner refused to send semen to the same facility for a different mare in 2009 for a 2010 foal, as "there was an EVA positive mare on the premises"

    The vet I was using previously honestly had no idea as to the protocols to follow, pulling a blood sample BEFORE vaccinating - nothing - with regards to vaccinating stallions. No one I asked had information that made sense, nor stories that matched. I think that was the most disconcerting thing of all to be honest - ask 10 reputable professionals and you'd get 10 completely different answers and then a very confused Mare or Stallion owner in the process ...

    Kathy has made the information very user friendly and very easy to understand and I am sure all of us are very grateful that she continues to take the time to do so ...



  9. #9
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    Jul. 5, 2002
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    FL
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    We are vaccinating the weanling fillies that are keepers today. I first vaccinated for EVA in 2000 when I was going to breed with frozen imported semen for the first time. Vaccinating the mares was strongly recommended by my equine repro vet, as she had experience with EVA positive frozen semen that was not disclosed as positive. Vaccination for EVA is a simple thing and a very good idea for all stallion owners and for most mare owners.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueColours View Post
    NorthHill Farm - I think the absolute tragedy in the industry is that very simply, a huge number of vets out there do not seem to be "up on" or "knowledgeable on" this and many also disseminate total false and damaging information as well through their total lack of knowledge ...

    Case in point

    My Faux Finish mare has been in PA for 2 1/2 - 3 years now. I live in Ontario, Canada and my stallion is at my facility here in Ontario and hasnt left the property for the last 2 years.
    Faux Finish was bred to an EVA positive stallion last year and so was her pasture mate - on the same day - in PA. They quarantined together in the same paddock and both are now 3 1/2 months away from foaling

    A VERY well known vet and breeder has gone onto several bulletin boards and slammed me for putting clients breeding to my stallion at risk of contracting EVA in their mares by either getting semen shipped from him or sending their mares to my farm to be live covered by him. Because I own a mare that was bred to an EVA positive stallion, even though she is a good 500-600 miles away from MY stallion and has been for the last 2 1/2-3 years ... ... and "my" property was now contaminated as a result ... by "her" ... even though she has never even set foot on this property yet (as the barn wasnt built before she left ...)

    Totally insane that I had to go public to defend my stallion against an "industry professionals" accusations as they should have simply known better, being in the veterinary industry and being a breeder to boot. And shame on them for NOT being "up" on issues that are affecting the veterinary and breeding industry in this day and age so that they can advise their clients correctly instead of spreading false information ...


    A friend of mine has her mares at a boarding barn here in Ontario. One of the mares there was bred to an EVA positive stallion in 2008 and foaled in 2009. ANOTHER stallion owner refused to send semen to the same facility for a different mare in 2009 for a 2010 foal, as "there was an EVA positive mare on the premises"

    The vet I was using previously honestly had no idea as to the protocols to follow, pulling a blood sample BEFORE vaccinating - nothing - with regards to vaccinating stallions. No one I asked had information that made sense, nor stories that matched. I think that was the most disconcerting thing of all to be honest - ask 10 reputable professionals and you'd get 10 completely different answers and then a very confused Mare or Stallion owner in the process ...

    Kathy has made the information very user friendly and very easy to understand and I am sure all of us are very grateful that she continues to take the time to do so ...


    Wow, just wow. You've really got to wonder about some people. I honestly cannot believe someone would be so hard-headed as to say not to breed to your stallion, because you bred a mare on a different facility to an EVA positive stallion.

    I think that *all* breeding animals should be vaccinated for EVA, and quarantine is not really a pain at all. I've had one stallion, and one mare vaccinated, it was fairly easy. I'm getting ready to vaccinate two more stallions, and another mare here in the next couple of days (or rather as soon as I get the vaccine). From now on, every mare I get will be vaccinated for EVA before being bred to any stallion, EVA positive or not.


    To the poster who commented on why it's worth breeding to an EVA stallion. My question is, why not? Sure it's a minor speed bump, but really not a big deal. There is absolutly no reason not to breed to an EVA positive stallion if he is the one that is right for your mare. I will admit that before I decided to breed to an EVA postive stallion, I was very cautious and uneducated about it... many vets still strongly discourage it, simply due to lack of knowledge I think. I have one mare in foal to an EVA positive stallion, due in May, and another mare that I will be breeding to the same EVA positive stallion in early Spring. It is silly to absolutly turn your back on a nice stallion just due to that, especially since mares can contract the infection at shows, inspections, ect... it's good to have them vaccinated regardless.
    Last edited by Dressage_Diva333; Dec. 28, 2009 at 02:41 PM. Reason: spelling
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  11. #11
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    Jun. 9, 2009
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    I'm glad you mentioned the number of vets who don't seem to have a clue about EVA . . . I thought maybe it was just me living in the boonies but all I ever heard, 'well, we haven't seen any cases around here'.

    I had to throw a fit to get the vet to test and then vaccinate my stallions. And then the last vet mentioned something about giving them annual boosters didn't do any good because they would already test positive . . . ???

    My thought was it's a false positive, so I still need to keep them protected from catching the real thing . . . .

    Normally, I just get a 10 dose vial and vaccinate the younger horses that might be coming and going from the farm, but this year I decided to just do the stallions. It was difficult finding single doses . . . anyone else have that problem?



  12. #12
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    The vaccine only comes in 10 dose viles, there is no other way to get it to my knowledge. I need four doses, and my vet doesn't want to buy the 10 dose vile. I said I could use six if that would help (heck I could probably use all 10 if I had to)... UGH.

    You need to booster yearly (or test titers, then booster if neccessary), I just go ahead and booster yearly. They will always test positive in their blood after the vaccine, but the semen will be negative. Thats why it's important to document that they WERE negative.

    Is the vaccine on back order still? I really do need to get those doses, and my vet has had no luck getting me the vaccines thus far.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage_Diva333 View Post
    The vaccine only comes in 10 dose viles, there is no other way to get it to my knowledge. I need four doses, and my vet doesn't want to buy the 10 dose vile. I said I could use six if that would help (heck I could probably use all 10 if I had to)... UGH.
    http://www.atozvetsupply.com/ARVAC-E...p/197-fda1.htm

    Or you can get together with a few people in your area and order 10 doses and split them. It does save money.

    http://www.allivet.com/Arvac-p/10301.htm

    Is the vaccine on back order still? I really do need to get those doses, and my vet has had no luck getting me the vaccines thus far.
    Last I heard it is no longer on back order. See above for places to order the vaccine.

    Good luck!
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  14. #14
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    We ordered from allivet and got it last week.



  15. #15
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    Thanks for the links! Is this something that I can order direct or do I have to have my vet order it for me?
    I too will only need 4 doses, maybe 6 if I do the weanling I am keeping to add to the broodie band. Anybody know at what age you can start vaccinating them?
    I'm too afraid to do my pregnant mares after they foal with the 3 week quarantine, etc as I want them rebred on 30 day heat and foals must be 2 weeks old before mom can be vaccinated- that's just too tight a window for me. They are already foaling late. They are the 2 that I'm not even considering the EVA+ stallion for so hopefully I'll be OK- 1 probably won't even be here until next fall anyways.
    My vet said it wasn't a big deal when I asked her about using an EVA+ stallion- she was very nonchalant about the whole thing...I didn't realize it would be such process! Reading this thread is making me a little more nervous...but...that being said I do very much like the stallion and I think he's a great match for the 2 mares I have picked out for him.
    Hopefully the owners of the other stallions that I'm using this year are OK with my using an EVA+ stallion on a mare, I never thought about it being an issue if I'm educated and prepared to take the necessary steps to protect everyone on the farm.
    TrueColours that really sucks about your stallion. How did they think your stallion contracted the virus with your mare so far away?? Rumors sure are easy to start...
    At least you got a chance to set the record straight...and I've heard a lot of good things about your stallion.



  16. #16
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    Yep, those are the only two places where I found the vaccine. . .both were fast and friendly.



  17. #17
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    Sep. 14, 2003
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    Livermore CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dressage_Diva333 View Post
    The vaccine only comes in 10 dose viles, there is no other way to get it to my knowledge. I need four doses, and my vet doesn't want to buy the 10 dose vile. I said I could use six if that would help (heck I could probably use all 10 if I had to)... UGH.

    Is the vaccine on back order still? I really do need to get those doses, and my vet has had no luck getting me the vaccines thus far.
    I'll go in on a 10 dose vial with ya, Dressage Diva



  18. #18
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    TrueColours that really sucks about your stallion. How did they think your stallion contracted the virus with your mare so far away?? Rumors sure are easy to start...
    At least you got a chance to set the record straight...and I've heard a lot of good things about your stallion.
    Simply put?

    Idiot vet *assumed* my mare and my stallion were on the same premises and not 500-600 miles apart, didnt bother checking to see if that was the case or not and posted on 2 bulletin boards stating how unethical I was that I didnt divulge to Mare Owners that their mares would now possibly be "contaminated" by either the semen or by being on my property as a result ...

    Oh yes - BELIEVE me ... I set the record straight all right, exposed the alter they were posting under AND advised everyone on the 2 boards which vet it was that was making a total ass out of themselves by a) hiding behind the alter in the first place and b) spouting off this total BS about something they obviously knew "0" about. And should based on their profession ...

    And thank you for the nice comments on my stallion as well ...



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthHillFarm View Post
    Thanks for the links! Is this something that I can order direct or do I have to have my vet order it for me?
    You should be able to order themselves.

    Anybody know at what age you can start vaccinating them?
    We start vaccinating colts before they have circulating levels of testosterone - usually around 9 months.

    I'm too afraid to do my pregnant mares after they foal with the 3 week quarantine, etc as I want them rebred on 30 day heat and foals must be 2 weeks old before mom can be vaccinated- that's just too tight a window for me.
    If you're not breeding to an EVA postive stallion, it won't make any difference if you breed them during their quarantine period.

    They are already foaling late. They are the 2 that I'm not even considering the EVA+ stallion for so hopefully I'll be OK- 1 probably won't even be here until next fall anyways.
    See above. You don't have to wait for them to complete the quarantine to breed them to a non-quarantine stallion.

    Hopefully the owners of the other stallions that I'm using this year are OK with my using an EVA+ stallion on a mare, I never thought about it being an issue if I'm educated and prepared to take the necessary steps to protect everyone on the farm.
    Why would the other stallion owners even be informed that you are breeding to an EVA positive stallion. It does not impact them in any way or really, other than vaccinating the mares that you're breeding to their stallions, those mares and the breeding process, either.

    Hope that helps!
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  20. #20
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    Yes, thanks Kathy! I appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions!

    The only thing I am worried about with my currently pregnant mares is getting them bred at the clinic I use while under quarantine- I'm not sure my vet will take anything under quarantine at the clinic to be bred and she's so busy durning breeding season I'm not sure she'll come here to do it even though I'm less than 10 minutes down the road, used to work for her, and own my own set of stocks.

    It never occurred to me that I might have any trouble with other stallion owners until TrueColours mentioned that she'd had some trouble...but I don't see how it would make a difference either if I'm taking the necessary precautions to protect everyone...



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