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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default Shocking gates?

    I know I saw a post about this way back, but I can't find it in the search. Our darn gates are shocking. They weren't when we first hooked it up (about a week ago) but started a couple days after. What gives?? I'm an electric fence idiot and knew that it seemed to go too smoothly at the time. The wire under the fence is insulated and the wires around the posts and coming up the post are either insulated or in insultube (in the case of the coated hotwire). Is it just jumping? Suggestions? It's starting to sting a bit.

    ETA: Sometimes the gate itself is fine and the chain around the post is what's shocking and vice versa. The chain is nailed in place so the pieces hanging down don't hit the wire, but maybe they're too close?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    land of the Canucks aka West Coast B.C.
    Posts
    4,172

    Default

    We have this problem with a couple gates on the property. Bosses always say that its a short on the wire caused by a branch or one of the little white/grey insulators that have fallen out of its holder.

    Not sure if that helps at all. Since i'm kinda useless when it comes to electric fences. I just report them to people who can fix them! lol But do have to work up the nerve to open said shocking gate to get horse in/out which is annoying!

    P.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    6,331

    Default

    If the posts still have some moisture in them, like treated that is less than a year old, or still green wood, and someone drove a staple holding the wire in too tight, you now have a good patch for the current to flow to hinges fastened to the post. It's really important not to drive any staple all the way home on the insulated wire. One hammer lick too many and you then have an agravating repair job to do. I no longer let my helpers drive any staple on an underground wire.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom King View Post
    If the posts still have some moisture in them, like treated that is less than a year old, or still green wood, and someone drove a staple holding the wire in too tight, you now have a good patch for the current to flow to hinges fastened to the post. It's really important not to drive any staple all the way home on the insulated wire. One hammer lick too many and you then have an agravating repair job to do. I no longer let my helpers drive any staple on an underground wire.
    Well darn it. This idiot is the one who did it and I can see it very possible that I at least nicked the coating of drove them too far in one spot. Our posts were also cut last fall and sat on the ground all winter so I would imagine they're still pretty green. Darn. How would a stupid person like myself go about fixing this!? The insultube didn't fit over them or else I would have had that as extra protection.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    6,331

    Default

    The reason I knew about the problem is because I also learned the hard way. Plastic electrical conduit is cheap and available in Lowes or Home Depot. Never put an underground electric fence wire in the ground that you can't pull out and replace. Buy the elbows with the large radius turns for each side of the gate. The wire will only push through one way without fouling on the fittings. If for some reason you can't push it through, suck a mason's line through- with a little rag tied onto one end-with a vacuum cleaner. Make sure to only use the hub end fittings and don't cut it in two and use a coupling. The hub ends make it streamlined in one direction only.

    No fix other than digging it up and replacing the wire. It'll still arc where the staple was driven too tight even if you can get the staple out without further damage to the wire. You might as well put the conduit in while it's dug up.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    8,720

    Default

    You might think of this as a useful feature, no horses hanging or leaning against the gates!! Will save the gates being damaged. There are times when I wish one or more gates WERE electrified. Instead I had to run a hot wire inside so horses could not reach the gate.

    You could run the chain thru an old piece of hose so you can touch it without shock. Maybe wrap some innertube around a hand place on the gate itself, to insulate the metal from yourself when you open or shut the gate, if you want to leave it electrified.



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