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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2007
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    22

    Default Saddle fitting ? with pictures

    Thanks to all...
    Last edited by accolade; Sep. 28, 2010 at 07:56 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2008
    Location
    Stuttgart, Germany
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    558

    Default

    I personally would scoot it back about 2 inches as it looks like it's sitting on the shoulder blade but other than that I definitely think I looks like it's going to work.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 24, 2010
    Location
    Northeast
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    178

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    Quote Originally Posted by n2dressage View Post
    I personally would scoot it back about 2 inches as it looks like it's sitting on the shoulder blade but other than that I definitely think I looks like it's going to work.
    Ditto. Needs to be moved back a bit, but looks to be a very good start, and if any changes do need to be made, they should be well within "adjustment range." Congrats!!
    It is a fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2006
    Posts
    1,396

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    I do not think this saddle is a particularly good fit for your horse. It is always more difficult to tell from pictures rather than seeing the saddle on the horse in person. I get the feeling from the side shots, that the tree needs to be more rounded to correctly fit the barrel, and not so "A" line and scissor-like. I think you are going to find that this saddle pinches the horse's shoulders fairly high up, especially after it is girthed.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
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    1,246

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    Can you slide it back 2 " or so and then get on and get a friend to take all the same photos. I worry that once it is back behind her shoulder and you are in it, the back will begin to float. Even with it so far foreward, the back looks a little high.

    Your mare may not be gnashing because it is a different saddle with pressure in places different to her old one - ie it isn't yet causing pain.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,803

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    I agree that the saddle is too far forward. I also agree that the shape of the tree may be too "A" shaped for your horse. It looks like it will impinge on your horse's shoulders.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2010
    Posts
    18

    Default

    What brand of saddle is that?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    16,783

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    Take your mare's opinion seriously. If you want a good test, ride her down hill in it and see what she says. It also must not rock when you post. But too narrow/too A-frame shaped may fool you with this test.

    It's not horrible. If you want to keep looking, then do look for something that's wider, more U-shaped at the top and perhaps with a wider gullet so that the panels meet her back a little bit wider/lower down from her spine.

    Since this is wool flocked, your saddler can probably make it fit well enough if you guys agree that it's not to A-shaped. I'd like the panels to follow the angle of her back a tad better near the cantle.

    But all this may really change when you slide the saddle back those few inches everyone is talking about. You put it on too far forward and slide it back until it stops. That's where the saddle will always go and the position from which you need to evaluate its fit.

    Best of luck with your meeting between mare, saddle and pro on tuesday! It would be great to see some "after" pictures for comparison if your saddler makes it work. We could all learn something.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,727

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    dont worry about where the billets lay. the billets don't know where your horse's shoulder is
    put the saddle where it should be (2" back) and then when you girth, swoop the girth forward.
    I have to do that with my saddle and if it fits it won't move
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
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    Home of "The Office", PA
    Posts
    1,152

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    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    dont worry about where the billets lay. the billets don't know where your horse's shoulder is
    put the saddle where it should be (2" back) and then when you girth, swoop the girth forward.
    I have to do that with my saddle and if it fits it won't move
    I don't think that is the case. I have been told that the billets should hang staight down to where the girth should lay slightly behind the elbow. If the billets are being pulled forward to place the girth there, the saddle will be pulled forward too right into the shoulder. No matter how well the saddle fits, there would be a forward pull on it, and it will move or be wedged against some muscle or bone structure.
    The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dramapony_misty View Post
    I don't think that is the case. I have been told that the billets should hang staight down to where the girth should lay slightly behind the elbow. If the billets are being pulled forward to place the girth there, the saddle will be pulled forward too right into the shoulder. No matter how well the saddle fits, there would be a forward pull on it, and it will move or be wedged against some muscle or bone structure.
    And this is why they invented anatomical girths. Some horses with a very forward girth groove just plain CAN'T have the saddle correctly placed + the billets hanging down in the appropriate girthing spot. An anatomical girth allows the billets and girth to be where they respectively want to be.

    That said, I have seen what you are describing (saddle placed correctly, non-anatomical girth placed correctly, and girth slid forward into the girth groove "pulling" the entire saddle into the shoulder) and I agree that it's NOT good. Especially if the saddle has a point billet--then the tree point is basically jammed/diving into the shoulder. Yeowch for the horse.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    And this is why they invented anatomical girths. Some horses with a very forward girth groove just plain CAN'T have the saddle correctly placed + the billets hanging down in the appropriate girthing spot. An anatomical girth allows the billets and girth to be where they respectively want to be.
    Absolutely!

    You have to place the saddle according to the horse's shoulder, withers, back, etc - all the stuff on top.

    THEN you see where the billets lay, and whether a traditional girth allow the billets to stay where they belong.

    if they don't, you see if an anatomical girth helps the situation.

    But even a forward girth groove + anatomical girth is not a 100% cure, as sometimes it's really all about where the billets are on the saddle and their angle, so that alone may mean looking for a different saddle.
    ______________________________
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
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    SE Ky
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    My saddler changed the forward billet position so that the girth would hold the saddle where it needed to be - so place saddle behind shoulder (you should be able to feel top of shoulder blade) and if need be saddler will adjust billet straps - mine moved the forward strap MORE forward to hold saddle in place.
    Sandy in Fla.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
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    Wow, I never quite realized what those anatomical girths were for except to add a new fancy shmancy design. It makes perfect sense, though. Thanks for enlightening me
    The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.



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