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  1. #1
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    Default Need ideas for a Dressage book. What would you like to read about in one?

    I've been thinking (scary yes I know)

    I do some writing, and have been published several times over.

    If I decided to do a book about Dressage, any aspect of it, what would you like to see in it?

    I was thinking of doing a dressage trainers in America type thing, and getting a photographer involved.

    BY NO MEANS lol do I want to do something that's actually teaching people movements and such. This would be more of an interest piece.

    WHEN and IF we go to Germany in two years I would then do a European one as well for maybe a second book.

    Ideas?



  2. #2
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Default

    Life stories of the less than famous riders among us... especially the ones who boot strapped it up, with non traditional horses....

    I am frankly tired of reading about rich kids who had great PC mounts then moved up to clinic with BNTs and finally "found" themselves at GP. ESPECIALLY if they were home schooled so they could ride. Especially if their spouse is a big name lawyer or such and they do not have to support themselves....

    Get the drift? Someone like me who made it!

    l



  3. #3
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Aren't "writers" meant to have their own ideas ? Isn't that why they make the dough ? Surprise me !
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  4. #4
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    Thanks Lori, that's something I was also thinking as well. Mostly like the smaller barns with great success type thing.

    Eq, er, well yes if I was writing fiction, I'd have a tons of ideas... From this board alone

    But for an interest piece, I'd really like to know MORE about what's interesting to you all!
    Last edited by NOMIOMI1; May. 25, 2010 at 04:55 PM.



  5. #5
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    Default

    % ?
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  6. #6
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    Sep. 21, 2007
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    Default

    I dunno -- I see chasms. Between your good "local" trainer and your good "international level" trainer. Trainers whose students move up, and trainers whose students don't. Trainers who are in it to have students depend on them, and those who develop riders who can think (and ride) for themselves. Those enthusiastic novice students who are trying to do the right things, yet still, as a right of passage almost, have to make their own mistakes (as far as selection of mounts, barns, trainers etc. is concerned), and still stick with it. And those who give up (not necessarily riding altogether, but moving up). Those whose DNA contains "horse" parts, and those whose brain contains enough rationality to overcome the urge of the pursuit of equestrian perfection. lol, maybe I should write my own book: The book of equestrian chasms.
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  7. #7
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    Jul. 16, 2009
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    Default

    Any of the ideas above! I love reading a good dressage inspired book! I really like Lori's idea of a non-traditional breed moving up through the levels or a rider that isn't as privileged getting a chance to make it! Those of us in those situations, do enjoy a good inspiring story!



  8. #8

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    There once was a little TB named Seabiscuit, who took on the big boys one by one and beat them.....then came the king of the hill the horse named Man 0 War and little Seabiscuit showed him in a one on one race who really was the best.

    Find such a story in dressage and you will be the new equine writer in history
    www.hartetoharte.org
    Ask and allow, do not demand and force.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by spirithorse View Post
    There once was a little TB named Seabiscuit, who took on the big boys one by one and beat them.....then came the king of the hill the horse named Man 0 War and little Seabiscuit showed him in a one on one race who really was the best.

    Find such a story in dressage and you will be the new equine writer in history
    LOL

    That would be THE story of all time!

    AND a time travel piece as it actually was War Admiral not Man O War that he defeated lol



  10. #10
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    Apr. 12, 2006
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    Default

    I sort of like the underdog theme too, or stories of people who brought their horses along themselves. I'd find that more inspirational, and would probably relate more to the 90% of the population who isn't rich or buying made horses....

    Or maybe as an underdog myself, I'm biased...?

    If you were going to go with that type of theme, perhaps you could include some handicapped riders too. I've seen/met a few, and they may be the most inspirational of all.
    River Oaks Farm - home of the Elite Book Friesian Sporthorse Grand Prix dressage stallion Lexington - sire of four consecutive FSA National Inspection Champions. Endorsing the FSA.



  11. #11
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    I would like a photographic depiction of taking a horse through the levels from the different schools of training.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  12. #12
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    I'm pretty old, or at least old enough to remember when the distinction between trainer and rider wasn't so large. What I remember from my kiddom is that everyone was supposed to learn how to improve their own horse. That was true when the H/J world was already broken into trainers and riders, so dressage looked really different.

    I'd be curious to see what pros who did scramble up by themselves have to say about this trend. Maybe looking for "self made" people of different generations would be of interest.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #13

    Default LOL

    Yep, the old brain got the horses wrong....

    still that is a good premise
    www.hartetoharte.org
    Ask and allow, do not demand and force.



  14. #14
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    Default

    I do some writing, and have been published several times over.
    Please provide titles. I'm making up my next Kringle list and may want to include some of your best sellers.
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier



  15. #15
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    a book on how ordinary, garden-variety horses with all sorts of conformational boo-boos (not top-bred warmbloods) have been transformed or improved by dressage. Ya know, before-and after pics, lesson plans, frustrations, successes and failures.



  16. #16
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    .......oh, and a racy expose on the sex life of today's hottest dressage stars (human not equine).



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by spotted mustang View Post
    a book on how ordinary, garden-variety horses with all sorts of conformational boo-boos (not top-bred warmbloods) have been transformed or improved by dressage. Ya know, before-and after pics, lesson plans, frustrations, successes and failures.
    That's something I could love to see!

    The transformation moving through the levels, or just becoming more solid in training, can give a horse. Janet Brown-Foy referenced a study showing how dressage work made some older, unsound horses more sound. I'd love examples like that, as well as changes in various types of well built, started properly and more physically challenged horses. I know the changes I see happening in my own horse, and would love a guide of what changes happen in other horses with proper training, to know what to expect/look for. Even Ravel and Totilas have changed a lot as they advanced in their training, I'm sure.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  18. #18
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    Jul. 23, 2004
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    we always hear about how dressage training can improve "any horse", but we never see "any horse" in the books - the books are of course written mostly by top dressage riders and trainers, who only ride top horses.

    the closest to this kind of book I've seen is Erik Herbermann's Dressage Formula, where he shows pics of more-or-less average horses doing dressage movements.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by spotted mustang View Post
    we always hear about how dressage training can improve "any horse", but we never see "any horse" in the books - the books are of course written mostly by top dressage riders and trainers, who only ride top horses.

    the closest to this kind of book I've seen is Erik Herbermann's Dressage Formula, where he shows pics of more-or-less average horses doing dressage movements.
    Slightly off topic, but Jane Savoie's Cross-train Your Horse books feature several "any" horses.



  20. #20
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    Actually, what I've written up until now has had nothing to do with horses

    This would be a new experience. An editor I work with told me that when I decided to do something new that I needed to make sure that -

    A. It's on something I know.

    B. It's on something I am passionate about

    These are great ideas!

    If I were to do the less traditional breeds thing I'd do both the lower levels and the upper speaking to those who have made it through the ranks.



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