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  1. #21
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    Mar. 4, 2004
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    Louisville, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrightandClear View Post
    IMHO, it's sort of creepy to be feeding your horse fish oil just so they can be shiny...

    I'm all for omega 3s and what not, but I think I'll stick to flax.
    Yes, and chondroitin is made from cartilage (cow trachea, pig ear, shark, etc)...most of what we feed our horses today isn't "natural." So I guess fish oil doesn't bother me. Will try to get some pics when I'm at the barn today.

    Caitlin
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  2. #22
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    Sep. 8, 2007
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    Well, recent studies have shown that fish oil is a much more beneficial source of omega-3s than plant sources. Something about absorption. I've been feeding fish oil to my TB for over a year now. He's got atrial fibrillation (nothing wrong with the heart itself though). So I feed it for his heart health, and I've got to say his stamina is through the roof!

    They did a study with racehorses where 150 mg of fish oil was added to the diet. The hearts of horses on fish oil had to work much less to pump the same amount of blood as those not on fish oil.



  3. #23
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    I don't know, but here horses are only on alfalfa hay and greening pasture, just finished shedding, not blanketed at all ever and are absolutely gorgeously shiny, which will start fading as we go into the harsher sun of the mid summer months.
    We call that the late spring bloom.

    I think that is because of the extra protein.

    If a horse is already on a proper plane of nutrition, I would wonder if I saw improvements from any one supplement.

    When feeding any extra oils, be sure the ration is balanced, so the oils don't keep some vitamins from being absorbed.



  4. #24
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    Aug. 21, 2004
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    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I don't know, but here horses are only on alfalfa hay and greening pasture

    You are talking about the same fatty acids. Grass is a good source of the same FA as found in linseed and in fish oil. Icelandic horses were traditionally fed salted fish during the winter. Fish oil is the ingredient in Clovite that gives horses the nice bloom. Been fed long time, but folks just don't know the source of the vitamins. I don't care about the source, as long as they eat it.
    http://shop.2farm.com/pdf/msds/B1005075.pdf

    Meat Science
    Volume 66, Issue 1, January 2004, Pages 21-32

    Effects of fatty acids on meat quality: a review

    J. D. Wood, , R. I. Richardson, G. R. Nute, A. V. Fisher, M. M. Campo, E. Kasapidou, P. R. Sheard and M. Enser
    Interest in meat fatty acid composition stems mainly from the need to find ways to produce healthier meat, i.e. with a higher ratio of polyunsaturated (PUFA) to saturated fatty acids and a more favourable balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFA. In pigs, the drive has been to increase n-3 PUFA in meat and this can be achieved by feeding sources such as linseed in the diet. Only when concentrations of α-linolenic acid (18:3) approach 3% of neutral lipids or phospholipids are there any adverse effects on meat quality, defined in terms of shelf life (lipid and myoglobin oxidation) and flavour. Ruminant meats are a relatively good source of n-3 PUFA due to the presence of 18:3 in grass. Further increases can be achieved with animals fed grain-based diets by including whole linseed or linseed oil, especially if this is “protected” from rumen biohydrogenation. Long-chain (C20–C22) n-3 PUFA are synthesised from 18:3 in the animal although docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is not increased when diets are supplemented with 18:3. DHA can be increased by feeding sources such as fish oil although too-high levels cause adverse flavour and colour changes. Grass-fed beef and lamb have naturally high levels of 18:3 and long chain n-3 PUFA. These impact on flavour to produce a ‘grass fed’ taste in which other components of grass are also involved. Grazing also provides antioxidants including vitamin E which maintain PUFA levels in meat and prevent quality deterioration during processing and display. In pork, beef and lamb the melting point of lipid and the firmness/hardness of carcass fat is closely related to the concentration of stearic acid (18:0).



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2005
    Location
    The Land of the Frozen
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    13,787



  6. #26
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    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
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    Congrats! She is a beautiful girl. I love her head in the third photo.. Very sculpted and feminine.
    MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
    http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    That is one NICE looking horse you have there. We're using Animed flaxseed oil (sort of a joke, there isn't much flax in it) and apart from the Cushing's fuzz he is a lovely rich chestnut. Got to get the teeth done again, clip him and try to do a good job of it and then see what we get.

    Congrats on the show!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  8. #28
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    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Watts View Post
    You are talking about the same fatty acids. Grass is a good source of the same FA as found in linseed and in fish oil. Icelandic horses were traditionally fed salted fish during the winter. Fish oil is the ingredient in Clovite that gives horses the nice bloom. Been fed long time, but folks just don't know the source of the vitamins. I don't care about the source, as long as they eat it.
    http://shop.2farm.com/pdf/msds/B1005075.pdf

    Meat Science
    Volume 66, Issue 1, January 2004, Pages 21-32

    Effects of fatty acids on meat quality: a review

    J. D. Wood, , R. I. Richardson, G. R. Nute, A. V. Fisher, M. M. Campo, E. Kasapidou, P. R. Sheard and M. Enser
    Interest in meat fatty acid composition stems mainly from the need to find ways to produce healthier meat, i.e. with a higher ratio of polyunsaturated (PUFA) to saturated fatty acids and a more favourable balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFA. In pigs, the drive has been to increase n-3 PUFA in meat and this can be achieved by feeding sources such as linseed in the diet. Only when concentrations of á-linolenic acid (18:3) approach 3% of neutral lipids or phospholipids are there any adverse effects on meat quality, defined in terms of shelf life (lipid and myoglobin oxidation) and flavour. Ruminant meats are a relatively good source of n-3 PUFA due to the presence of 18:3 in grass. Further increases can be achieved with animals fed grain-based diets by including whole linseed or linseed oil, especially if this is “protected” from rumen biohydrogenation. Long-chain (C20–C22) n-3 PUFA are synthesised from 18:3 in the animal although docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is not increased when diets are supplemented with 18:3. DHA can be increased by feeding sources such as fish oil although too-high levels cause adverse flavour and colour changes. Grass-fed beef and lamb have naturally high levels of 18:3 and long chain n-3 PUFA. These impact on flavour to produce a ‘grass fed’ taste in which other components of grass are also involved. Grazing also provides antioxidants including vitamin E which maintain PUFA levels in meat and prevent quality deterioration during processing and display. In pork, beef and lamb the melting point of lipid and the firmness/hardness of carcass fat is closely related to the concentration of stearic acid (18:0).
    Are you saying that these oils are in any important measure in grasses?
    I think they are in the seeds, as in linSEED oil, but I could be wrong.

    Here is more about those oils:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid

    That doesn't include the latest mega study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that has yet other results, so many showing where those previous studies were inconclusive, about the merits or demerits of those oils for our health, by missing the mark, measuring those oils, when it was the carbohydrates that were the active substances causing many of the changes observed.

    For what we know, those oils don't work in a vacuum, they are but a small part of a very complicated homeostasis process.



  9. #29
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    Aug. 21, 2004
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    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Are you saying that these oils are in any important measure in grasses?
    As they are found in higher levels in animals fed only grass pasture, I believe that is a reasonable presumption.



  10. #30
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Watts View Post
    As they are found in higher levels in animals fed only grass pasture, I believe that is a reasonable presumption.
    Just as you are assuming there, my understanding was that is the metabolism of the individual animal that produces that kind of fat in that animal, with the nutrients given and not necessarily any already processed fats themselves it may eat.

    Go look at that last Journal of Clinical Nutrition, because their mega study is turning old fat and carbohydrate knowledge a little bit on it's ear, may affect the new guidelines for what our nutrition should be and why:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...against-cardio

    http://www.ajcn.org/misc/release1.dtl

    One comment on that study was that we may ought to start considering that it is not the butter on that toast you had for breakfast that is bad for your health, but the toast itself.
    Teasing about that, of course, nutrition is more complicated than that.
    Last edited by Bluey; May. 22, 2010 at 08:30 PM.



  11. #31
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    May. 31, 2004
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    1,405

    Default oil

    FWIW, a clients father races Standardbreds and they are given 60CC orally of fish oil daily and are the softest shiniest horses I have ever seen. I asked how they had such amazing coats and that was why....it's in Canada and there is a supplement company common there that sells it in big jugs, can't think of the name right now.



  12. #32
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    Aug. 21, 2004
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    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
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  13. #33
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    Aug. 21, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post

    Go look at that last Journal of Clinical Nutrition, because their mega study is turning old fat and carbohydrate knowledge a little bit on it's ear, may affect the new guidelines for what our nutrition should be and why:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...against-cardio
    You're preaching to the choir. I have been on a low carb, high fat diet for years and my good cholesterol is off the charts high, and insurance company gave me lower premiums after blood work because I'm so healthy. But I guess the nitrates in the summer sausage and bacon will be the death of me.



  14. #34
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    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
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    Katy, funny you mentioned Clovite. Used to use it years ago. Had most of my students using it too. Horses looked fabulous on it. Also the dogs & barn cats loved it & really did well on it. I've been thinking of trying it again. The prices of supplements are through the roof & Clovite used to be one of the cheaper ones.
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  15. #35
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    Apr. 15, 2004
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    Sunny Sonoma, CA
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    My SmartPak for this month has already shipped, but based on the OP and feedback I changed my next month's order to SmartOmega 3!

    I have a DARK bay and I can't wait to see how this works on him.

    Thanks for the tip. Beautiful mare, BTW!
    Founding Member of "I Kept 'Off Topic Day!' Open"



  16. #36
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    Oct. 6, 2004
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    PA
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    I put one horse on SmartOmega 3 and one on SmartDigest and the one on SmartDigest has a better coat. Needless to say I'm switching them both too it now. My mare has always had a nice coat and so has my gelding but my gelding has blossomed on the SmartDigest....I've also been able to cut back on his grain. So I'm hoping the mare will have the same reaction to it.



  17. #37
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    Dec. 11, 2005
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    Castle Rock, CO
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    I have been feeding Omega Horse shine - so for those of you using the SO 3- do you think it works better?

    I also have a dark bay almost black and he does not have as many dapples as he used to nor is his coat as nice. However he is in good weight. Much better than he used to be.



  18. #38
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    Mar. 4, 2004
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    Louisville, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by EquineLVR View Post
    I have been feeding Omega Horse shine - so for those of you using the SO 3- do you think it works better?

    I also have a dark bay almost black and he does not have as many dapples as he used to nor is his coat as nice. However he is in good weight. Much better than he used to be.
    It's been awhile since I used Omega Horseshine, but yes, I do think the Smart Omega is working the best of anything I've tried. IMO.

    Caitlin
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  19. #39
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    Jun. 18, 2006
    Location
    Louisiana
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    Default WOW!!!

    I am a big fan of Omega Horseshine. Have used it for years...everybody in the barn gets it (in smartpaks).

    Would y'all recommend the SmartOmega3 over the OHS?

    Sorry - double question...read for comprehension JenRose!
    Animals are not disposable!!!
    http://www.pawsnela.org



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    Boston MA
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    the really funny thing is the smart omega is not designed to be a skin/ coat supplement, it is supposed to supplement the omegas and vit E and A for horses that are not on pasture! When I called SP about switching to the smart omega from the omega horseshine they were very adamant about that, so I opted not to switch.....the rep kept insisting it was NOT a coat supplement!!!

    My horse is incredibly shiny and dappled on the omega horseshine!!



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