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  1. #1
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    Jun. 5, 2004
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    Default How to get maggots out of a wound?

    This horse has a large open wound and a hole in his muscle where maggots have moved in. Is the common? How big of an issue is this? How do you get rid of them. Not my horse; just a horse at the barn. I am just wondering what you would do.



  2. #2
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    Feb. 11, 2005
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    Pa
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    Wow...the poor horse! Is there some reason why whoever the asshat is that owns this horse has not called a vet?!! Yes maggots can be removed and no it is not always bad but not good either. Usually it comes from a wound not being cared for. Maggots only eat dead tissue so having a vet clean up the wound is recommended. You can pour Hydrogen peroxide on the wound and that willhelp flush out some of the maggots but you probably have ones buried deep in the tissue that need to be removed. I would suggest someone call a vet!!
    "A little less chit-chat a little more pitter-pat"



  3. #3
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    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Maine
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    Default

    Just recently I watched an episode of Animal Cops where a dog had been left to die with multiple bite wounds. The wounds were crawling with maggots. The vet dealing with it said there was no real treatment, nothing they could put on to kill the maggots; she stated that all the maggots would need to be flushed out--she was using a big syringe and water.



  4. #4
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    Jun. 14, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    I saw a show once where someone had a maggot in their scalp. The doctor covered the tiny hole the maggot used to come up for air with vaseline. It smothered the maggot. It then had to be removed.

    That said, a vet needs to see this horse. The wounds needs to be cleaned and flushed.



  5. #5
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    Jan. 3, 2010
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    874

    Default

    Aren't maggots a natural way to clean infected wounds? They may be doing more good than harm.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggot_therapy

    Fascinating Wikipedia entry about it. And, yes a vet should be called, but this may not necessarily be a bad thing in the long run.
    ==================
    Somehow my inner ten year old seems to have stolen my chequebook!



  6. #6
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    Jul. 25, 2005
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    Ontario
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaila View Post
    Aren't maggots a natural way to clean infected wounds? They may be doing more good than harm.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggot_therapy

    Fascinating Wikipedia entry about it. And, yes a vet should be called, but this may not necessarily be a bad thing in the long run.
    We had a dog that got maggots for a wound that was not noticed in thick thick fur, when we rushed him off to the vet the vet said many types of maggots produce a type of toxin that kills flesh. Which makes sense as it then gives them more to eat.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Default

    Sweet Baby J. Tell the owner to call the vet!
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  8. #8
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    Feb. 11, 2010
    Location
    Northern Michigan
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    Default

    Maggots only eat necrotic (dead) tissue...they don't eat anything alive. This is why they are useful for wound cleansing in a hospital setting.

    That said, immediate veterinary attention is probably necessary for a wound of that nature.



  9. #9
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    Ivermectin.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2007
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    MD in winter, NY in summer
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    181

    Default

    Can you use Ivermectin topically? I still say-call the vet.
    "The only easy day was yesterday" USN SEALs
    courtesy of LCDR K.R.W, USN (ret) RIP, 4/10/09



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
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    CT
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    3,325

    Default

    Seriously? Gee.. this is a toughy. How 'bout some good old betadine and water, possibly flooding the punctured area (or 'hole) with Hetacin K, then:

    FERPITYSAKE CALL THE GOTTAMN VET.

    **headdesk**



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
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    Default

    If the owner doesn't call the vet why don't you call animal control/aspca?
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
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    None of the above.

    Maggots eat only dead flesh, as someone stated above.

    But the suggested treatments are not correct.

    If the wound has maggots, it means that there is too much dead flesh to sew up.

    So get a couple of cans of Granulate. It is in a yellow pressurized can and it is not cheap. As I recall, $14.00 a can and the can is small.

    Most large animal supply stores carry it.

    Spray it on the wound twice a day.

    The wound will change from an ugly gray pussy mess to a raw red wound.

    But that is what you want. Red will heal.

    Keep spraying and the wound will close up all on its own.

    I keep a can of it on the place at all times so I will have it when needed for immediate treatment.

    It was developed for granulated or proud flesh.

    I had a hound that had one of the worst looking wounds I have ever seen on a dog. I have never found out how it happened.

    But during a period when I was feeding for several nights in a row at very late hours, causing me to miss the start of the problem, she acquired a wound that was as large as a large man's hand.

    It really looked like someone had tried to behead her starting on the back of her neck.

    I had fed for several nights late at night and missed the start of it, so when I saw it in the light it was already a nasty mess full of maggots.

    I treated it as described above with Granulate and If I sent you today to my kennel to get the hound with the scar on the back of her neck, you could not find her.

    I thought a wound that large with the skin spread so wide open must be stitched, but my veterinarian taught me better.

    CSSJr



  14. #14
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    Dec. 25, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitfield Farm Hanoverians View Post
    If the owner doesn't call the vet why don't you call animal control/aspca?
    You could call animal control, make a big fuss, be a trouble making ass or you could buy a couple of cans of Granulate and cure the horse.

    I would do the latter.



  15. #15
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Been there, done that--with a wound that was stitched, no less!! Flushed them out with a syringe and water (I believe the stitches had to come out, too)



  16. #16
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    Jun. 5, 2004
    Location
    Frankfort, IL
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    Default

    Thanks for all the creative ideas. Lets stop saying call the vet though (or animal control). Its been done; the owner is taking care of it. I was just interested to see how others have treated it. Thanks for the input.



  17. #17
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    Apr. 10, 2008
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    658

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    It's not entirely true that maggots are good because they only eat dead flesh - they release all sorts of vile substances while doing that and those substances are very toxic to living tissues. So those tissues die, and then there is more dead stuff for the maggots to eat. Maggots get in when a fly lays eggs on a small sore - they can really quickly enlarge that sore into an unsalvageable problem.

    Using sterile maggots that have been harvested specifically for the purpose of medical debridement is different and much more closely controlled than an infestation on a wound.

    Anything will remove the maggots from the wound - hemostats, topical treatments (but you want to be careful because that's some pretty sensitive tissue), dilute betadine, water, etc. Good fly control is needed to prevent reinfestation while the horse heals - may have to be hospitalized or stalled with fans.

    Yuk.



  18. #18
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    Jun. 5, 2004
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    Frankfort, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by animaldoc View Post
    It's not entirely true that maggots are good because they only eat dead flesh - they release all sorts of vile substances while doing that and those substances are very toxic to living tissues. So those tissues die, and then there is more dead stuff for the maggots to eat. Maggots get in when a fly lays eggs on a small sore - they can really quickly enlarge that sore into an unsalvageable problem.

    Using sterile maggots that have been harvested specifically for the purpose of medical debridement is different and much more closely controlled than an infestation on a wound.

    Anything will remove the maggots from the wound - hemostats, topical treatments (but you want to be careful because that's some pretty sensitive tissue), dilute betadine, water, etc. Good fly control is needed to prevent reinfestation while the horse heals - may have to be hospitalized or stalled with fans.

    Yuk.
    Do they need air to breath? What if you clean it out, put the topical treatment on there and cover it with wax paper or ceran wrap?



  19. #19
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    Jul. 11, 2009
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    New England
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    Quote Originally Posted by dacasodivine View Post
    I saw a show once where someone had a maggot in their scalp. The doctor covered the tiny hole the maggot used to come up for air with vaseline. It smothered the maggot. It then had to be removed.

    That said, a vet needs to see this horse. The wounds needs to be cleaned and flushed.
    What you are talking about is not a maggot, its a Human Bot Fly Larva. Very different kind of nasty critter. They DO eat live flesh and will eventually grow into a full grown adult Bot Fly.



  20. #20
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaila View Post
    Aren't maggots a natural way to clean infected wounds? They may be doing more good than harm.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggot_therapy

    Fascinating Wikipedia entry about it. And, yes a vet should be called, but this may not necessarily be a bad thing in the long run.
    I'm going to agree with this, somewhere we have a taped TV program about various off the wall therapies, (maggots, leeches, honeybee stings), including the use of maggots for long term wound care on the foot of an elderly diabetic lady (done in England).
    Determining the best course of action is definitely the job of a vet.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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