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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
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    California
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    Default In between the jumps!!

    Okay... what's gives. I ride a five stride line NO PROBLEM... get to the six stride to a one and CANNOT get that SIX!!! UGGG... It's a nice seven "however"!

    I have a 16 2 hand horse.. that should have a 12 ft stride. I re-measured AND re-measured the distance with a TAPE MEASURE to be sure.. and UUGGG. I have got it a few times but it doesn't come easy "at all".....

    Can you tell Im frustrated.

    I make sure he's straight.. try to think open up... But I don't want him racing down the line just to make this $*&(#^%* stride.

    Any tips/hints/tricks/ or even "jump dances" that you find work for you???

    THANX......
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2000
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    The OC
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    Default

    My guess your issues ins't the 6 strides, its the 1 stride that comes after. A combination out of a line is going to back your horse up. Try the 1 stride after the 5 and see if you have trouble...then you will know!

    If that is the case, put the one stride as rails on the ground and build up from there.

    How big are you jumping? If it is under 3' you may also ahve a hard time getting down the lines because you don't need a lot of impulsion at the height, and your horse can take off and land closer to the jumps.



  3. #3
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    Aug. 13, 2008
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    Default

    I had the same experience in a lesson last month. My trainer set up a supposed 4-stride and I kept getting five. And my horse is 16.2hh with a normal/big stride, and I usually don't add strides. My trainer told me that I was holding him too much coming into the line(even though I didn't think I was), and she made me practically gallop towards the first jump, land, and send him forward. It was scary as hell, but we got the four strides perfectly! My trainer said that our pace wasn't wild and outrageous like I thought it was, but actually a nice moving pace. I did it a few more times and realized that she was right; I previously was holding him too much and not letting his stride "flow" down the line.Looking at a line, if I know going in that it's going to be a long 4, I'll come to the first jump with a good pace, land, and keep my leg on to continue the pace. If I want a 5, when I land I just sit up, steady, and wait.

    Can you have someone watch you, or even have someone else ride the line on their horse?



  4. #4
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    Feb. 14, 2000
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    San Diego, CA
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    Default

    In a 6 to a 1 (where the 1 isn't generous), you need to get the 6 done early, so that you're waiting a bit to the in of the 1. It's all in thinking about the *next* thing, so you set yourself up for it.

    Much easier to say than do, as I found out today!

    But, in general - get any "work" done early in a line, so you've got what you need at the out of it without having to make a big move. Procrastination is a killer.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,290

    Default

    If the jump is away from home, especially if you are passing the in gate, the line will ride much longer. Are you jumping a 5 stride line coming home, then the 6 away? Also a line later in the course will ride shorter than one early in the course, as a horses stride will naturally open up later.

    Get a little more pace/open stride than you think you need, and ride to a forward spot, landing and moving up instead of waiting a couple strides then trying to get it. As someone else said, the one stride after will naturally back your horse off, so you need to ride up to the first jump in the line and continue to ride forward as soon as you land. Also, look beyond the last jump as you are going down the line.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paw View Post
    In a 6 to a 1 (where the 1 isn't generous), you need to get the 6 done early, so that you're waiting a bit to the in of the 1. It's all in thinking about the *next* thing, so you set yourself up for it.

    Much easier to say than do, as I found out today!

    But, in general - get any "work" done early in a line, so you've got what you need at the out of it without having to make a big move. Procrastination is a killer.
    This.

    You don't want the last stride to be a flyer, especially if you have a combination following. Land from the in with your leg ON and ride forward for 3-4 strides. The six should then be pretty easy.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  7. #7
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    Default

    Interestingly this line to the one stride "is" towards the barn... thinking that would help.. but NO.

    I do think you are right by saying the one at the end visually throws "us" off. Yes, I will blame my riding skills on this one. That's why I set up the one because when my horse sees this coming - - he doesn't have confidence in himself that he can do it. And I need to ride with a lot of right leg to keep him straight.

    I will focus on making sure he is moving forward at the first jump - and that makes sense to get the work done first....... however.......

    I do have a show this weekend so - - "it is what it is" at this point and lets hope the show doesn't have any ones at the end of the lines.. Ha ha....

    It does feel we must go at a pretty good clip to get the job done - - but I don't think it doesn't "look" like it - - it just feels like it.

    I think maybe video would help me. I see those nice hunter and equitation horses going around in the you tube videos and I would like that ride but when I'm in the saddle - - I don't feel that's what we look like... Its hard to ride forward without getting my horse a bit keyed up...... I guess it's something we need to work on... UGGG.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  8. #8
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    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by doublesstable View Post
    Interestingly this line to the one stride "is" towards the barn... thinking that would help.. but NO.

    I do think you are right by saying the one at the end visually throws "us" off. Yes, I will blame my riding skills on this one. That's why I set up the one because when my horse sees this coming - - he doesn't have confidence in himself that he can do it. And I need to ride with a lot of right leg to keep him straight.

    I will focus on making sure he is moving forward at the first jump - and that makes sense to get the work done first....... however.......

    I do have a show this weekend so - - "it is what it is" at this point and lets hope the show doesn't have any ones at the end of the lines.. Ha ha....

    It does feel we must go at a pretty good clip to get the job done - - but I don't think it doesn't "look" like it - - it just feels like it.

    I think maybe video would help me. I see those nice hunter and equitation horses going around in the you tube videos and I would like that ride but when I'm in the saddle - - I don't feel that's what we look like... Its hard to ride forward without getting my horse a bit keyed up...... I guess it's something we need to work on... UGGG.
    In this case my best advice is to ONLY canter in that same forward mode - even when you are just flatting. You need to get comfortable with that pace so it doesn't feel like you are rushing when you pick up that "pretty good clip" to jump.

    It will also help school your horse that that is the appropriate canter, and encourage him to relax instead of building.

    A lot of adults, particularly, love a slow lopey canter that is easy to sit and super quiet. You can jump singles out of that step all day long BUT it doesn't work for lines - and the longer the lines are, the more obvious this becomes. It takes a fair amount of discipline to put the horse together and canter around with more energy and impulsion (not a longer stride, but a more powerful one.) Once you get used to it, though, you will find it is easier both to see a distance and to make minor adjustments more smoothly, because that canter gives you more options. Ask me how I know this
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucassb View Post
    In this case my best advice is to ONLY canter in that same forward mode - even when you are just flatting. You need to get comfortable with that pace so it doesn't feel like you are rushing when you pick up that "pretty good clip" to jump.

    It will also help school your horse that that is the appropriate canter, and encourage him to relax instead of building.
    You are so right.. You said exactly what he does - build expecially when we start over jump. My thought is "why should in between the jumps" be any different than our flat work that is great!

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucassb View Post
    A lot of adults, particularly, love a slow lopey canter that is easy to sit and super quiet. You can jump singles out of that step all day long BUT it doesn't work for lines - and the longer the lines are, the more obvious this becomes. It takes a fair amount of discipline to put the horse together and canter around with more energy and impulsion (not a longer stride, but a more powerful one.) Once you get used to it, though, you will find it is easier both to see a distance and to make minor adjustments more smoothly, because that canter gives you more options. Ask me how I know this
    OMG!!! You hit the nail on the head. I feel so much better hearing this... thanks.. I'll work on it.

    My poor horse. I have owned him since he was a week old... he's now 11...... and his "Adult" owner trained him.

    I guess I need to start riding over fences my 18 hand guy. He has NO PROBLEM making it down a line... as a matter of fact he like to do his job and questions when I pick on him....
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



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