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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
    Location
    south eastern US
    Posts
    2,531

    Default Horses Die From Contaminated Hay After Floods

    http://www.wkrn.com/global/story.asp?s=12497513

    Oh Wow! You think you dodged a bullet by surviving the floods and then Wham! I feel so sorry for those affected.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,994

    Default

    How awful for them all So sad
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
    Posts
    2,900

    Default

    Heartwrenching. Hopefully their pain will save some other horses. So sad.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2001
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    4,466

    Default

    How terrible. We need to spread this news, so everyone is aware that this can happen. Jingles to these horses and their owners.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    892

    Default

    Hi, I talked to the vet treating these horses. While they have botulism, it did not come from any water reaching the hay. In fact, water did not reach the hay. The vet is positive there was another source of infection.

    Obviously, if bags of feed or hay got wet, it would mold and you would need to dispose of it. But botulism is not a result.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,847

    Default

    Years ago I remember a story about a couple of horses dying. There was a dispute about what killed them - the local sewage treatment plant had overflowed untreated wastewater onto their pasture, but their pasture was also heavily overgrown with star thistle (poisonous). Ultimately the star thistle was blamed for the deaths (although of course the owner thought the sewage treatment plant was the real culprit).

    I'm curious as to whether the flood created any situation that permitted the botulism organism to thrive in an area where the horses could ingest it, and/or how they ingested it. FD can you keep us posted?
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    892

    Default

    According to Dr. DeLisle, there should be no lasting effects on pastures even if they were flooded, as far as cutting and baling hay off them. Botulism in hay often come from a dead animal being rolled up in a bale so always check hay before feeding, she says. (Not sure how you'd do that on a big round bale).

    Of course, if there is any debris in the field or fences down, etc., you need to get that out of pastures.

    If your horse was standing in water or has been in muddy conditions, she suggest treating pre-emptively for thrush and keeping a watch out.



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