The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default Rowel Spurs???

    Are rowel spurs legal in the hunter ring, or are they considered unconventional and frowned upon? Thanks.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2006
    Posts
    3,381

    Default

    The latter.
    Quote Originally Posted by barka.lounger View Post
    u get big old crop and bust that nags ass the next time it even slow down.

    we see u in gp ring in no time.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    "Unconventional" is always subjective, so take that with a grain of salt. That being said, I would wonder why anyone would actually NEED rowel spurs in the hunter ring??
    Here today, gone tomorrow...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFrytheEqHorse View Post
    "Unconventional" is always subjective, so take that with a grain of salt. That being said, I would wonder why anyone would actually NEED rowel spurs in the hunter ring??
    A lazy WB who ignores traditional spurs.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gideon View Post
    A lazy WB who ignores traditional spurs.
    I have one of these horses. Do this:

    1. Purchase a dressage whip.
    2. Get on horse armed with said dressage whip.
    3. Do A LOT of upward transitions. When horse ignores the leg (which he will) give him a good, hard smack with the whip. Do this for about 20 minutes.
    4. Drop the whip.
    5. Enjoy your newly well-tuned-to-the-leg horse.
    6. Touch up as needed.

    Seriously, there is no reason that a hunter needs rowels, much like there is no reason for a horse to have spur marks on its sides. The basic transitions necessary of a hunter are extremely easy to tune using a few well-timed sessions with the whip. "Laziness" is actually a behavior issue, not a personality trait.

    My guy tends toward laziness and general slow response to leg aides. While I ride him in "soft touch" spurs, I have found that he doesn't need anything more than that if I keep him tuned to my leg. I do a lot of transition work (focusing not just on upward transitions, but downward transitions- these guys tend to collapse during downward transitions, and it's important NOT to let them do this). It's gotten to the point that he KNOWS what's coming the second the whip comes out (every 4-6 weeks). It "whips" him into shape rather quickly.

    I know you didn't ask for advice, but I really recommend giving this method a try before strapping on what could be considered unconventional equipment.

    Beyond that, I have also found a straighter spur without the downward curve of a traditional POW to be more effective at times.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Maybe perhaps check Jane Savoie's piece on getting your horse to "think forward."

    I considered my horse very lazy and as a result of my efforts of trying to keep him going forward, I made him dull to my aids. Jane's techniques are doing wonders for my horse and he now marches along and maintains his energy rather than me constantly working to do it for him.

    http://www.janesavoie.com/blog/reari...think-forward/

    She has a lot of videos on youtube - you might check to see if she has one out there on the subject.

    Good luck!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2009
    Location
    Paddle faster! I hear banjo music...
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    yes they're legal. Tune ups are better but yes, you will see a fairly good bit of them.
    "ronnie was the gifted one, victor was the brilliant intellect, and i [GM], well, i am the plodder."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TexasAggieEventer View Post
    Maybe perhaps check Jane Savoie's piece on getting your horse to "think forward."

    I considered my horse very lazy and as a result of my efforts of trying to keep him going forward, I made him dull to my aids. Jane's techniques are doing wonders for my horse and he now marches along and maintains his energy rather than me constantly working to do it for him.

    http://www.janesavoie.com/blog/reari...think-forward/

    She has a lot of videos on youtube - you might check to see if she has one out there on the subject.

    Good luck!
    Great article, thanks for sharing.
    I'm going to try this with my horse and see how he responds to it. I'm tired of carrying him around the ring every ride.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFrytheEqHorse View Post
    I have one of these horses. Do this:

    1. Purchase a dressage whip.
    2. Get on horse armed with said dressage whip.
    3. Do A LOT of upward transitions. When horse ignores the leg (which he will) give him a good, hard smack with the whip. Do this for about 20 minutes.
    4. Drop the whip.
    5. Enjoy your newly well-tuned-to-the-leg horse.
    6. Touch up as needed.

    Seriously, there is no reason that a hunter needs rowels, much like there is no reason for a horse to have spur marks on its sides. The basic transitions necessary of a hunter are extremely easy to tune using a few well-timed sessions with the whip. "Laziness" is actually a behavior issue, not a personality trait.

    My guy tends toward laziness and general slow response to leg aides. While I ride him in "soft touch" spurs, I have found that he doesn't need anything more than that if I keep him tuned to my leg. I do a lot of transition work (focusing not just on upward transitions, but downward transitions- these guys tend to collapse during downward transitions, and it's important NOT to let them do this). It's gotten to the point that he KNOWS what's coming the second the whip comes out (every 4-6 weeks). It "whips" him into shape rather quickly.

    I know you didn't ask for advice, but I really recommend giving this method a try before strapping on what could be considered unconventional equipment.

    Beyond that, I have also found a straighter spur without the downward curve of a traditional POW to be more effective at times.
    I've done this, but not on a consistent basis and maybe that's the problem.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gideon View Post
    I've done this, but not on a consistent basis and maybe that's the problem.
    I find that mine needs a "refresher" every month or six weeks. When I get lazy, he starts getting lazy. I think it's one of those things you have to be consistent about- kind of like a curfew with unruly teenagers :c).
    Here today, gone tomorrow...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,389

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFrytheEqHorse View Post
    I have one of these horses. Do this:

    1. Purchase a dressage whip.
    2. Get on horse armed with said dressage whip.
    3. Do A LOT of upward transitions. When horse ignores the leg (which he will) give him a good, hard smack with the whip. Do this for about 20 minutes.
    4. Drop the whip.
    5. Enjoy your newly well-tuned-to-the-leg horse.
    6. Touch up as needed.

    Seriously, there is no reason that a hunter needs rowels, much like there is no reason for a horse to have spur marks on its sides. The basic transitions necessary of a hunter are extremely easy to tune using a few well-timed sessions with the whip. "Laziness" is actually a behavior issue, not a personality trait.

    My guy tends toward laziness and general slow response to leg aides. While I ride him in "soft touch" spurs, I have found that he doesn't need anything more than that if I keep him tuned to my leg. I do a lot of transition work (focusing not just on upward transitions, but downward transitions- these guys tend to collapse during downward transitions, and it's important NOT to let them do this). It's gotten to the point that he KNOWS what's coming the second the whip comes out (every 4-6 weeks). It "whips" him into shape rather quickly.

    I know you didn't ask for advice, but I really recommend giving this method a try before strapping on what could be considered unconventional equipment.

    Beyond that, I have also found a straighter spur without the downward curve of a traditional POW to be more effective at times.
    i agree 100%
    (|--Sarah--|)

    Blitz <3 & Leap of Faith <3



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    6,979

    Default

    Are we talking rowel or little "pizza cutters"? If the latter, then you see plenty of them.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    375

    Default

    I only ride local circuit. I do use the rowel spurs, and it is legal locally, at least.

    I don't see many of these spurs at the local shows, but my mare and I do best with this type of spur (for us, more the length than anything else).



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    I would give a swan neck spur a good, hard try before going to the rowels: http://www.calevo.com/calevo/images/items/2210112g.jpg.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...



Similar Threads

  1. Rowel Spurs
    By ponyjumper525 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct. 16, 2012, 09:49 PM
  2. Type of spurs?
    By bigeqjumper in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May. 10, 2012, 03:30 PM
  3. Spurs
    By AnneD in forum Eventing
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Oct. 2, 2011, 09:56 AM
  4. Which Spurs to Get?
    By Inspire in forum Dressage
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Dec. 17, 2010, 06:33 PM
  5. Which spurs next ?
    By mandalea in forum Dressage
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Jul. 26, 2009, 10:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •