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  1. #1
    gomoms Guest

    Default don't know what to do about mallard

    I really don't know if i'm in the good section of the forum, sorry if i'm not.

    I live in Canada and I have a small pond in front of my house(very small!) I have a female mallard, that i know she will lay her eggs close to my house because she's always here. the male is with her for the moment.

    I don't know if it's a good idea for her to lay her eggs here on my property for a few reasons. I have a dog who enjoy chasing ducks. But my main concern is that my pond tends to dry out during the summer time. What happens if she has her baby here, and they are not abble to fly at the beginning and my pond dries out? I live in a wooden area, where will she find water for the babies? they won't be abble to stay in the water, like ducks do.

    i tried to scare her a little, to show her that it is not as quiet as she thinks,lol. but they won't leave, they adopted the area. wich is great because i love ducks but i'm mostly concern for her babies and my pond!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2006
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Animals are amazing creatures. Should she lay eggs and hatch them and your pond dries out, they will lead the babies away to more suitable accommodations. I wouldn't worry if they lay eggs and your dog gets them, it's the way it's supposed to be.

    I am not trying to be harsh, but nature has a way of taking care of the balance. We have a 3 acre pond and unfortunately some high tension wires in close proximity. A Canadian goose accidentally got tangled in the wires and broke a wing. Since he could no longer fly, he became a fixture in the pond and we figured he wouldn't last thru winter (northern Ohio). Three years later, neither coyote, fox or snapping turtle have been able to take him out .



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    300

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Songsmom View Post
    A Canadian goose accidentally got tangled in the wires and broke a wing. Since he could no longer fly, he became a fixture in the pond and we figured he wouldn't last thru winter (northern Ohio). Three years later, neither coyote, fox or snapping turtle have been able to take him out .
    Songsmom - you just proved my post on another topic about the ability of Canada geese to serve as watch/guard dogs!

    Gomoms - it is actually common for ducks and geese to lay their eggs in one pond, then move the young soon after hatching to another waterway, even one that is 1/2 mile away. I had a goose lay her eggs near my pond (well actually in my wheelbarrow), then moved then within a week to my neighbor's pool, about 1/4 mile away. He was not happy....



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    2,842

    Default

    I really don't think that dogs getting wildfowl eggs is "the way it is supposed to be". In fact, the dog is likely to get the hen and the eggs since I am sure she will try to defend her nest.
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    Franklin Delano Roosevelt



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,137

    Default

    This is where you need to have an incubator and a brooder on hand, so you can steal her eggs while she is out eating, and hatch them and raise them yourself. Then you will have more ducks! And really, it's hard to have too many ducks, especially if you have a pond.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    5,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampton Bay View Post
    This is where you need to have an incubator and a brooder on hand, so you can steal her eggs while she is out eating, and hatch them and raise them yourself. Then you will have more ducks! And really, it's hard to have too many ducks, especially if you have a pond.
    That's illegal in Canada, or at least was. In some areas, however, the duck people did take eggs and incubate because mallards were getting scarce thanks to the huge snow goose population. The reason for the egg stealing is two hatches from the same pair, one by incubation and the second by the pair.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    4,888

    Default

    (1) No, don't steal eggs from wildlife nests. This is illegal in the US as well as in Canada.

    (2) It is possible she made a poor choice in nesting sites. It happens. Yes, she may lose her eggs or young. Nature is not a nice place all the time. No, you are right, your domestic dogs are not natural predators. But neither is human intervention in the young-rearing process. But then again, neither is any of our presences in habitat that used to be their. It's always a quandary.

    If I were you, supervise the dogs so they can't get to her. Leave her be and let her do her thing. Even if babies can't fly, mum can walk them, and often will, to other water supplies. If you find yourself in a drought situation, I would not feel horrible about putting out a kiddie pool with rocks for steps in and out until they were ready to move on. Sort of a passive habitat offering. :-)



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