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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,914

    Default Forehead muscles have disappeared!

    The 2 forehead muscles, which the browband passes over, on my 16 year old Dutch/TB gelding seem to be disappearing. That area is nearly flat, instead of those muscle prominences with the 'valley' between them. I am certain he had them before, and that this is a change.

    ??? Any thoughts on this?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    56,684

    Default

    Are you sure those were not fat pads and, if your horse is more fit, have shrunk some?

    We had a bay horse that, when fat, we called Fathead at times, because his forehead got fat and creased in the middle, along with his hind end.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2005
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    1,012

    Default

    Or have you changed dentists? Some dentists believe that those big forehead muscles mean that the teeth are working too hard by not being done right.
    Laurie Higgins
    www.coreconnexxions.com
    ________________
    "Expectation is premeditated disappointment."



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    40,021

    Default

    My old TB gelding, and my current WB gelding, have prominent forehead muscles and their teeth were always impeccably kept up.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    12,903

    Default

    Are there any other symptons- a lameness, tilt or general oddness/stiffness? Loss of muscle makes me look down the neurological path.....



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,914

    Default

    SLW - Well, funny you should mention 'neurologic,' as that was a first thought. (I knew a mare with injury in the cervical vertebrae and she had lost her forehead pads).

    This horse has a lifetime of low-grade lamenesses that have been managed successfully. This past fall, he was diagnosed with desmitis. Given some of the symptoms of it, it has had me thinking that there is a neurological component to the disease, but I've not come across any discussion as such. It makes them stiff, but not 'odd' in their demeanor or bizarre in their way of going (it degrades their way of going).

    When you mention head-tilt, are you meaning a head-tilt in conjunction with a step here and there, or obviously tilting the head all the time?

    Bluey - I'd think the same thing, but my horse is fatter than ever. He's on acres of long-time pasture...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
    Posts
    11,970

    Default

    This horse has a lifetime of low-grade lamenesses that have been managed successfully.
    What is causing the low-grade lamenesses? Is the horse insulin resistant? It could be that the horse is experiencing loss of muscle mass which could be consistent with IR or Cushing's.
    "We want to raise our children so that they can take a sense of pleasure in both their own heritage and the diversity of others." ~Mr. (Fred) Rogers~



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Posts
    3,055

    Default

    Start with checking the teeth for sure. My experience is opposite of the earlier poster. Correct teeth=correct facial muscles. Pain in chewing may cause a change in chewing pattern. The forehead muscles are responsible for lateral movement and the lateral movement of the normal chewing motion can be inhibited from tooth wear problems.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,914

    Default

    His teeth have always been of note to me. He often chews as if he has a bad tooth (periodically sort of twists his head, drops grain -- or maybe they all do?) and has been doing this all his life. Teeth done on a regular basis, and done all his life. Last done = November.

    This horse is now 16.

    Probably not IR, as he's not losing conditioning or muscle mass -- in fact, he's looking pretty toned for his level of work. He is also out on a large field with 2 other geldings and they do some canter and trot when not eating grass.

    The other thing that has come to mind is that the flat area between the muscle pads may have filled IN?? from being a tad overweight?



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