The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2010
    Location
    Satellite Beach FL
    Posts
    89

    Default very thin, no topline, help rebuilding

    I just adopted an older gelding. He is very thin, no topline left what so ever. I have been shown how to do belly lifts and other exercises. I also plan to start lunging him/and walking some hills, some ground poles. Any other tips I am missing out on?

    He is on good quality pellets, great hay, great grass, and a weight gainer now. I plan to get his teeth done right away, he has been wormed.

    I actually have always shown my whole life. I have never adopted a horse in this condition. I want to get the old man fit agian for some light fun riding.

    Just looking for some encouragement and suggestions.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,502

    Default

    What are "good quality pellets"? What brand and type, how much?

    With the new program, especially the good grass, you may be very surprised how quickly he puts on weight and muscle. I think your program is a good starting place, and you'll just have to give him a couple of months to see how it all pans out
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2000
    Location
    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
    Posts
    7,563

    Default

    Pellets aren't high enough in fat. You need to get the highest fat feed you can find. Bite the bullet and invest in Purina Ultium. In one month you will see a marked change. Guaranteed. I've used it on two different OTTBs and it has yet to fail me. My barn owner noticed such an improvement, she started using it for her own horse and she'd tried everything.

    I say bite the bullet because it is expensive. I think I pay $21 a bag. One bag will last you about a week. Do it for a month and you won't be sorry.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,502

    Default

    high fat can be nice, but I'd rather give the current diet a chance. I hesitate to throw so many things at the horse right from the start.

    The exception would be for a horse who's already been on the diet outlined and something more/different is needed.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2004
    Posts
    1,394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anyplace Farm View Post
    Pellets aren't high enough in fat. You need to get the highest fat feed you can find. Bite the bullet and invest in Purina Ultium. In one month you will see a marked change. Guaranteed. I've used it on two different OTTBs and it has yet to fail me. My barn owner noticed such an improvement, she started using it for her own horse and she'd tried everything.

    I say bite the bullet because it is expensive. I think I pay $21 a bag. One bag will last you about a week. Do it for a month and you won't be sorry.
    FWIW, pellets can have be fairly high in fat, all depend on the brand. Ultium is 10 if I recall and Nutrena Safechoice is 7. Yes they are totally different feeds but, wanted to point out that you can get some higher fat pellets. All feeds can come in many different %'s



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2000
    Location
    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
    Posts
    7,563

    Default

    I should also add that due to its being extremely low in carbs, it does not upset the hind gut and chances are very low for colic.

    If you run a search here for Ultium, you'll see others who have used it successfully on very thin horses.

    Think Atkins diet for humans - very high in protein = a loss in body fat. High diet in fat = well, fat.

    If you want to stick with your pellets (very high in protein) add corn oil (very high in fat) to his diet.

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2000
    Location
    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
    Posts
    7,563

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SSFLandon View Post
    FWIW, pellets can have be fairly high in fat, all depend on the brand. Ultium is 10 if I recall and Nutrena Safechoice is 7. Yes they are totally different feeds but, wanted to point out that you can get some higher fat pellets. All feeds can come in many different %'s
    Ultium is 12.4% fat last I checked. http://www.horse.purinamills.com/products/ultium.asp

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,502

    Default

    Not all pellets are high in protein. Not all pellets are low in fat. The form of the feed does not 1:1 equate to any nutritional profile. There are pelleted feeds these days that are largely beet pulp-based - low in carbs. There are some where you can see pieces of corn in all the pellets - high in carbs. There are pellets where the binding agent is veggie oil instead of molasses - lower carb, higher fat.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
    Posts
    11,028

    Default

    You might consider adding Diamond V yeast to his diet--one ounce a day; it will help him better utilize what feedstuffs he's already getting. You can buy it from most feed stores in a 50 lb. bag. If you store it in a container in a cool, dry place you can keep it for over a year without worry....
    "Good gardening is very simple, really. You just have to learn to think like a plant." ~Barbara Damrosch~



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
    Location
    Staunton, VA, USA
    Posts
    2,487

    Default AS well as the Diamond V

    which is an excellent addition to any horses diet, I would also add in 1 -2 tablespoonfuls of whey protein. The whey will supply the essential amino-acids which will help with protein utilization.

    But above all go slowly! DO NOT try to put the weight back on too fast. It will take you several months to re build him back up and if you try to go faster by feeding too much, then you put him at risk of colic and or other problems.
    SO be patient, and allow him plenty of time on good grass hay.

    PM me if you need more info.
    YOurs
    MW
    Last edited by Melyni; May. 3, 2010 at 02:45 PM.
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2010
    Location
    Satellite Beach FL
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Thanks for the tips
    He is being switched over to Seminole Wellness Senior Mix. He was on Legends, not sure what the actual name of the formula is. He was on just costal hay an no grass that I could see in the paddock. He is out daily on grass now and getting T & A hay. I am a little hesitant to add anything else to the diet since he is adjusting to such a big change right now.

    I am just doing light lunging and walking a hill and poles, and ground exercises. He is very active when turned out intitally, so he is giving himself some exercise as well .

    All ears for any other suggestions

    Thanks



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
    Location
    Staunton, VA, USA
    Posts
    2,487

    Default A little bit of extra fat and protein can only help

    Quote Originally Posted by JillCozza View Post
    Thanks for the tips
    He is being switched over to Seminole Wellness Senior Mix. He was on Legends, not sure what the actual name of the formula is. He was on just costal hay an no grass that I could see in the paddock. He is out daily on grass now and getting T & A hay. I am a little hesitant to add anything else to the diet since he is adjusting to such a big change right now.

    I am just doing light lunging and walking a hill and poles, and ground exercises. He is very active when turned out intitally, so he is giving himself some exercise as well .

    All ears for any other suggestions

    Thanks
    But only in small doses. The best way to do that is to feed some whole flax seed. about 1 cup a day that will make a huge difference to overall health and welfare.
    Well worth the extra expense.
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



Similar Threads

  1. Rebuilding my tack/feed room and need help
    By Charliezmom in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jun. 7, 2012, 10:51 PM
  2. Rebuilding muscle in an aged (25 y.o) horse
    By baylady7 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jan. 10, 2012, 12:13 PM
  3. rebuilding touchdown jesus
    By tle in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Nov. 2, 2010, 02:26 PM
  4. Replies: 21
    Last Post: Feb. 25, 2010, 08:10 PM
  5. rebuilding the iraq stables
    By Tamara in TN in forum Off Course
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jun. 24, 2009, 12:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness