The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,789

    Question Thinking about teaching my teenager to drive. Thoughts?

    So my big ISH gelding isn't as young as he used to be. Neither am I. I am sure, in Ireland, he was taught to drive (or at least long-lined). I have done neither with him, and am wondering how realistic it is to try train a teenager to drive. He's a very smart horse, and picks new things up incredibly quickly. He's also very brave and quiet in new situations, so temperamentally, I think he's suited.

    Thoughts, please?
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2008
    Posts
    762

    Default

    I'm really new at this, but it sounds like you should give it a try!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2007
    Location
    Jasper, GA
    Posts
    2,148

    Default



    Sounds like a good candidate!
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,149

    Default

    Usually older horses are fairly easy to teach driving, IF all the brain parts cooperate. Often very smooth transition, though you still need to do all the needed groundwork on lines to get vocal commands learned, then lots of dragging stuff before THINKING of hitching.

    If you have not driven much or recently, you had best find an instructor and get some lessons down. Rein feel is much different, very easy to be heavy on his face with length of lines or long lines. Some educated horses don't LIKE you hanging on them! Feels like punishment.

    Perhaps you could find a Trainer/Instructor and learn along with the horse. Trainer has looked at lots of driving animals, and experienced eyes will see things developing that you may not notice. Stopping, changing or fixing harness, ring situation, can prevent an "incident" from ever happening. You see horse swishing tail, haven't a clue what his problem is or misread the situation in the Driving setting.

    Horse has to be accepting of whip use, touching ALL OVER his body. No kicking when frustrated or confused. Trusting you to care for him when he is confined in shafts or peculiar things ahead and you ask FORWARD. Has he been out trail riding or down the road to see weird things in yards, met traffic quietly? Easier to do that under saddle if he spooks sideways. He is older, so may have A++ skills there.

    Many horses are trained and get hitched. A number of those trained fail at some point in driving progress. Cooperative, but not reliable in situations. Even less get driven very much to develop into good driving horses. Takes a lot of miles and experiences to reach reliable. The skills and mindset for being a GOOD driving horse are very high, not all horses can have what you need. Harder to have a good driving horse than any of the ridden skills, needing that trust factor when you drive him towards peculiar things.

    It is certainly worth a try, if he is nice like you say. Age is not a factor, except on the plus side with his previous good training to build on. Lots of older horses get trained to drive, keep on having fun with their owners. Just set yourself and him up to be successful with good instruction and a planned training program.

    When I read the title, I thought you were talking about your kid, and wondered why it would be a question! SURE kids can drive!!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,789

    Default



    I did consider putting "teenager gelding" in the thread title, but figured "teenager" would be more fun. He actually is quite a bit like an 18 year old boy, so it's pretty accurate.

    My guy's an ISH imported from Ireland. We bought him from a video. There, they ride them out to foxhunt a couple of weeks after they're broke, just to get them out in company and teach them to jump anything. And my boy demonstrated that he knows what a fox is, and to follow it, so I'm pretty sure he did that. Also, on the video, he was being hacked down a village street, and a kid on a bicycle came up, rode a complete circle (about 15 meters, so tight quarters) around the horse, and went on. Horse never so much as flicked an ear, and has always been a steady Eddie hacking out. I think he'd be okay with a cart behind him (he's bred for it, after all ), but as you said, lots of training has to go on before that.

    The one concern I do have is that he is very soft mouthed. I ride him in a metal mullen eggbutt, and when he was doing the big fences, he went best in a rubber mullen Pelham, and he's 17.2. Would that be a deal breaker for you, if you had a horse like him to train to drive?
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2006
    Posts
    11,568

    Default

    Read the sticky FAQ's at the top of the driving threads. post 4 is about training an older horse to drive.

    Oh suffice it to say a horse is easier than an adolescent adult!

    MUCH less attitude!



Similar Threads

  1. Newbie to driving; teaching a Mini Donk to Drive
    By FatCatFarm in forum Driving
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Oct. 26, 2012, 11:02 AM
  2. teaching my mini to drive - what's next?
    By TheHunterKid90 in forum Driving
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct. 25, 2012, 04:24 PM
  3. i've been thinking...and would like your thoughts!
    By muffintop in forum Off Course
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Jul. 2, 2012, 11:22 PM
  4. Teaching a horse to drive
    By AQHA4me in forum Driving
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: Aug. 16, 2010, 12:08 PM
  5. So I end up co-teaching a lesson with my cat and I got thinking
    By classicsporthorses in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: May. 17, 2009, 07:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness