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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2009
    Posts
    230

    Unhappy Selling my first horse - need help

    I am in the process of selling my horse who I bought a couple of years ago. He is too much for me at my present level of skill but I love and really enjoy being around him, doing ground work with him, etc.

    I have never had an animal before that I didn't keep for its entire life so this is a very difficult decision and one I am still wrestling with.

    Finding him a good home is my main concern. Knowing this, what questions would you ask prospective new owners? I have been asking about their level of experience, if and where they take lessons, what they are looking for in a horse. What else should I ask? Is it reasonable to ask to see where they will be keeping him? What about references?

    Thanks.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    374

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coymackerel View Post

    Finding him a good home is my main concern. Knowing this, what questions would you ask prospective new owners? I have been asking about their level of experience, if and where they take lessons, what they are looking for in a horse. What else should I ask? Is it reasonable to ask to see where they will be keeping him? What about references?

    Thanks.
    Coy,
    what's 'reasonable' varies so hugely in this industry. really, it is whatever feels right for you. the one thing i would be clear about, though, is letting the potential owner know in advance -- for example, say i'm driving 2 hours to meet said horse. if you tell me in advance that you owuld like references, including photos of my boarding facility, well, i'd bring that stuff with me. or maybe even have you talk to my references FIRST, before i made the drive.

    We're a nonporfit rescue, so our scenario is a bit different than yours, but the way our world works is they have to fill out an application to adopt. we check references -- and the act of ASKING for references weeds out most of the people we don't want. we've only had one case in 09 or so far in 10 where we got references and they were negative. from references, we ask what type of horse they feel this rider could manage; whether the reference would trust this person to care for teh reference's animals for a 30 day period if an emergency came up; and others.

    then they are approved to adopt, pending upon their meeting with the horse. they come meet the horse (some choose ot meet first, then apply -- that's ok too!), and assuming they still wish to adopt and we feel it was a good match, we draw up a contract and ifgure out details.

    you're welcome to visit our website and review our adoption app and contract. ownership stays with us for 6 months after the horse leaves our facility, so that we have time to say 'this isn't working' (it's been very rare); then ownership transfers. we request our adopters donate the horse back to CWER if they ever can't keep him/her, and we've had that happen a few times. VERY few have sold their horses or given them away to someone else after the initial period was over.

    You COULD do a contract with your horse's sale, but it is likely going to make it more difficult to find a buyer. lots of people don't want that red tape, even when working with a nonprofit, let alone buying from an individual.

    Best of luck for you and your horse. i hope oyu find him a perfect home with a well matched rider. it's hard to admit you and your horse aren't well matched, and i applaud you for accepting that. For me, its always bittersweet when the right adopter comes along, and a horse i thought was going pretty darn nicely in my hands suddenly comes to life as a rockstar in the adopter's hands, as they are better suited to one another...

    Sincerely,
    AMC
    AnnMarie Cross, Pres, Crosswinds Equine Rescue, cwer.org
    Sidell IL (near Champ./UofI/Danville IL/IN state border)



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,195

    Default

    I had to give references when we bought my kids' pony, but I think it is unusual.

    Can't offer much advice on what to ask, but I would say to market him to Pony Club kids. Our region has an email list that goes out each day and people often advertise horses for sale on it.

    Good luck!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
    Posts
    4,589

    Default

    If you think the horse is going to go better in a program, I'd ask about what program they are planning on putting the horse into. Lessons only? Lessons and occasional training rides? Full training? Occasional lessons/clinics only? What do YOU think is the best mix of the above in a perfect world for this horse?

    If potential buyer has a trainer, I'd google them and do some research and see what they are all about. Does their training style and core training values seem to mesh with what you know about the horse? Do they have a high turn over of clients and or staff? Do people run screaming when trainers name is mentioned? Or do they have a steady base of customers (no matter how big or small) who are loyal and happy with happy and healthy horses?

    I don't think it's out of line to ask for pictures of the farm where your horse will be going. As Crosswinds mentioned, though, that needs to happen up front before they throw a leg over him or make the drive. If horse will move to a public boarding barn, again, google. Find out the nitty gritty.

    I'd ask about the potential homes turn out schedule. Individual or group? How many hours a day? You know what works for him.

    At the end of the day, you do what you can to find them the right home, but it's always a finger crossing endeavor.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Somewhere in the Midwest
    Posts
    2,142

    Default

    If your horse is too much for you, are you able to ride him for prospective buyers? You need to be specific up front as to what it is exactly that makes him "too much". Most buyers are either delusional or not up front about their riding ability. So with a more difficult horse, it is obviously important that the rider is experienced and confident. I sold a mare that was very talented but was hot and reactive. She is perfect for the rider who bought her who LOVES that but of course, she was not suitable for most people who think the horse should teach them how to ride.
    The way to endure a great home is to make sure it is a perfect match as far as personalities and goals.



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