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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
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    Default Interesting study- warm water soaking for hay

    http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/397/296622.html

    A new study conducted by the Laminitis Consortium suggests that soaking hay in summer temperature tap water makes it safer to feed to laminitis-prone horses and ponies.
    The research, indicated hay soaked at 16C for 16 hours resulted in the greatest loss of water-soluble carbohydrates — which can cause laminitis.

    The research was carried out by Dr Annette Longland of Equine Livestock and Nutrition Services, Dr Pat Harris of the Waltham Equine Studies Group and Clare Barfoot of Spillers.

    Ms Barfoot said, "Despite this exciting study, soaking hay should always be seen as an additional safeguard. It's crucial to have your hay analysed before feeding an animal with a high risk of laminitis."
    I'm not sure how practical it is for everyday, but I think it's great that there's research still getting done.
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  2. #2
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Default

    http://safergrass.org/pdf/SoakReport.pdf

    16c isn't all that warm. The safergrass study shows there correlation is much more about time than about temperature. For example, 60 minutes of soaking in cold water was more effective than 30 minutes in cold water, but about the same effectiveness as 30 minutes in hot water

    Both sugar and potassium can be leached out of all types of hay in significant amounts by soaking for at least 60 minutes in clean, cold water, or 30 minutes in hot water, and draining. The average reduction in sugar over 15 samples of a variety of hays was 31%. As the amount of sugars dissolved increased over time, this suggests that a longer soaking period may allow more even more sugar to be leached.
    So, they're probably saying the same thing, just in a different way.
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  3. #3
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    Dec. 16, 2003
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    Default Phew, soaking for 16hrs

    not a very practical way to do it.
    I mean you'd have to soak over night plus 4 hrs!

    It would be much more useful to know how much could be removed in 30-60 mins. Oh and 16C is not very hot.


    Not the most useful research. They could have done a better design of test.

    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
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  4. #4
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    Default

    I wonder if running water over the hay is better than just bathing the stuff in water that quickly would become more or less "saturated" with these soluble sugars.
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  5. #5
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    Dec. 16, 2003
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    Default Quite probably

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    I wonder if running water over the hay is better than just bathing the stuff in water that quickly would become more or less "saturated" with these soluble sugars.
    but then I would wonder if running cold water (16C) over the hay is as effective as standing it in 20C water for 30 mins?

    Now that might be a useful bit of research.

    Temp/time vs less saturation of sugar
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
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  6. #6
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    Default

    I agree Deltawave- when I'm soaking hay, I try to change the water at least once. Not sure if it actually does anything, but it makes me feel better.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
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    Default I'm sure it would help

    Quote Originally Posted by kookicat View Post
    I agree Deltawave- when I'm soaking hay, I try to change the water at least once. Not sure if it actually does anything, but it makes me feel better.
    how much it would help is not known, but fresh water would leach out more sugar.

    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
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