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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2004
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    IN
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    2,604

    Default Saddle fit pictures-- anyone with a good fitting saddle have pics?

    In particular, I am looking for what a saddle should look like from a rear perspective. I know the spine should be clear, but can't seem to find an image that shows better what the panels would look like.

    http://inlinethumb31.webshots.com/45...600x600Q85.jpg

    Is the image I have of my saddle. It looks *funny* but I can't quite put a finger on it.



  2. #2
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    Jan. 14, 2005
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    Aiken SC / Fay NC
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    Bumping because I want to know too
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  3. #3
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    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Columbus, OH
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    IMO, the panels are too sloped. I don't mean back to front, which is where people normally talk about panel slope, usually in a convo about banana-shaped panels versus flatter panels. I mean across the horse's back from side to side. In this case, it looks like the inside of the panel doesn't even touch the horses back and the outside of the panel digs into the horse's back. That might change once the horse is in motion (which is when it really counts), but in this case I seriously doubt that the horse gets more slopey. In short, these are the panels I'd expect to see on a shark-finned TB (as they are both very slopey laterally and they are sort of fat and tall, which would give ample clearance over a prounced spine and withers).

    I actually don't have a picture of my well-fitting saddles from the rear, but I could take one. Might not help you much, though, as my guy is indeed a withery TB who wears a slopey panel.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    16,653

    Default Meh... but here ya go

    http://s800.photobucket.com/albums/y...8.jpg&newest=1

    Don't love it, but I'll point out a couple of things.

    First, you may have a better sense of whether or not your saddle fits if you get a shot that shows the panels as they follow the "roof slope" of his back-- side to side, down from the spine. In your shot, his round butt is in the way. My pick could have been taken from a lower angle.

    Ideally, you want the angle of the panel (bottom edge) to follow the line of your horse's back.

    The thickness and composition of the panels will make a difference. Foam and full-stuffed panels (as in Amerigos) will appear to "stand up" off your horse's back. So long as the angle on the bottom side match his-- no edges at the sides of the seat digging in, you're probably all right.

    I don't have this angle, but the best fitting saddle for this horse in the cantle section had panels too thin elsewhere to work.

    Let me know if you want those posted.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  5. #5
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    Jan. 14, 2005
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    Default

    Good info
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  6. #6
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    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Columbus, OH
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    Roof slope! mvp, that is the perfect word for it!
    ________________________
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2009
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    Ahh I was thinking about saddle fit last night.

    When you saddle pad comes off the horse and sweaty horse is sweaty every where on his saddle area except right behind his shoulder um, whithers 2" down on a slant - that spot. What does that mean? Should his back be sweaty outlining the whole saddle?

    I have a lamtex tree, motions with him.



  8. #8
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    I will refrain from commenting on the theory of the lemetex tree and the "tree that moves with the horse", but regarding the sweat, there are three reasons why you'd get such a spot:

    1. Horse isn't very sweaty, ie hasn't worked hard enough to sweat up the entire saddle area. Just like on humans, some areas sweat faster/more than others.

    2. Saddle is creating pressure in that particular spot, the sweat glands are not responding as a result, and thus you've got a problem.

    3. Saddle is actually *not making contact* at that spot. Have seen this on TB-type horses with natural anatomical dips behind the withers that make it very challenging for a saddle to make direct contact all over the back (unless it's got wither gussets or similar). Sometimes it's a problem that needs attention, sometimes not.
    ________________________
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    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Oct. 5, 1999
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    After trying many many saddles for a very wide backed pony, I sent off for a Duett.

    According to Nancy at Duett, you MUST girth up and sit in the saddle to determine fit. Especially in a brand new saddle. The saddle will spread a little bit with the weight of the rider and the panels will flatten. So the "roof slope" will flatten as the saddle breaks it. And a saddle that appears to sit too high off the horse's back will sit lower with the weight of the rider.

    What is most important is the side view - the saddle must sit level. If the saddle sits level, girth it up and have someone sit in it. I highly recommend taking oodles of photos and sending them to someone who knows how a saddle should fit. They are way too expensive to waste money on a poor fit.



  10. #10
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    Feb. 17, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    I will refrain from commenting on the theory of the lemetex tree and the "tree that moves with the horse", but regarding the sweat, there are three reasons why you'd get such a spot:

    1. Horse isn't very sweaty, ie hasn't worked hard enough to sweat up the entire saddle area. Just like on humans, some areas sweat faster/more than others.

    2. Saddle is creating pressure in that particular spot, the sweat glands are not responding as a result, and thus you've got a problem.

    3. Saddle is actually *not making contact* at that spot. Have seen this on TB-type horses with natural anatomical dips behind the withers that make it very challenging for a saddle to make direct contact all over the back (unless it's got wither gussets or similar). Sometimes it's a problem that needs attention, sometimes not.

    Yeah I think the Lamtex tree theory is BS too Thanks for your imput...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
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    CA
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    Default

    I agree that the "roof slope" of the OP's saddle looks wrong for this horse. I doubt that a rider's weight is going to spread it enough to make up for it.

    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    regarding the sweat, there are three reasons why you'd get such a spot:


    3. Saddle is actually *not making contact* at that spot. Have seen this on TB-type horses with natural anatomical dips behind the withers that make it very challenging for a saddle to make direct contact all over the back (unless it's got wither gussets or similar). Sometimes it's a problem that needs attention, sometimes not.
    My TB has this and I haven't been able to find a saddle yet that makes direct contact across the full panel. It's doesn't seem to bother him from what I can tell. What it does happen, though and what bothers me, is that the saddle will slip back into the "dip" and then sit pommel low (and a bit too far back).
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
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  12. #12
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    My TB has this and I haven't been able to find a saddle yet that makes direct contact across the full panel. It's doesn't seem to bother him from what I can tell. What it does happen, though and what bothers me, is that the saddle will slip back into the "dip" and then sit pommel low (and a bit too far back).
    Welcome to my world. The Old Man DWB now has a "regulation shaped back" in the front two thirds. This means that with a shocking lack of muscle, he is shaped like the 1960s slab-sided TB close contact saddle makers thought we rode. But his ribcage is the same well-sprung breadth it ever was.

    A panel that more or less followed the angle of his roof slope would help. If it spread out near the cantle as the Pessoa panels do, that would help even more. I think this is the primary feature many of us thought was missing in the OP's pic of some "tall looking" panels.

    But the other big problem is that the panels don't get the shape or depth right in the front 1/3, the notorious wither hollow section where it's so hard to evaluate fit.

    The Beval F2B tree was built to handle this, as was the invention of skidrow, K- and dropped panels (in Black Country saddles) but I think saddlers still have a long way to go in getting this part of the saddle right.

    I mention this mysterious front 1/3 because in my horse's case, I'm convinced this has a lot to do with the saddle forever sliding back so that the pommel is lower than intended.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #13
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    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    My TB has this and I haven't been able to find a saddle yet that makes direct contact across the full panel. It's doesn't seem to bother him from what I can tell. What it does happen, though and what bothers me, is that the saddle will slip back into the "dip" and then sit pommel low (and a bit too far back).
    When my saddle started doing that (about 6 months after I bought it, perhaps due to the wool settling), I switched from girthing my saddle up on the middle two billets to the back two. It's an Amerigo with a total of four billets, no dropped or skid row panel design but I suppose I end up simulating such a panel with my sheepskin half pad. I have not had any sliding problems since then, and horsie's back remains healthy and happy.
    ________________________
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