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  1. #121
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    Apr. 2, 2010
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    Maybe, down the road, I'll feel comfortable posting my real name. I am a regular poster on COTH and I hope the essence of my posts speaks toward the situation's difficulties (and the agonizing process we've been through to make this decision) despite the lack of details. I am glad many posters have looked past that and provided comforting support. I can't thank you all enough.

    Being able to come on here and talk about this has given me perspective and assurance that we are doing the right thing. It would have been easy to walk away earlier on and not post any more updates, but if this thread helps someone understand a problem (or dangerous) horse better down the road (and gives them ideas about how to approach the situation) then posting here was worth it.



  2. #122
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2007
    Posts
    805

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    I am so sorry you have had to face this difficult decision but it seems as if you have faced it from an open, caring, yet responsible place. If he is attacking his turnout mates then it is not just fear or distrust of humans. It sounds as if he is a truly very unhappy soul for whatever reason. And yes there are probably a million things you could tweak but at what cost to him and to those around him? Sometimes that little voice in your head is the best resource and it usually is very painful when I don't listen to mine. I sincerely wish you peace in your decision and him a quick, painless journey to finally find peace of his own. I admire your strength and hope you can continue to believe you have done the right thing for him - I believe you have and for the right reasons.



  3. #123
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    7,203

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    [QUOTE=Thomas_1;4783979]
    Yet we've got folks saying "kill it"

    What the heck is wrong with the horse world nowadays.

    What happened to "train it"?

    [QUOTE]

    I'm going to presume this horse in in America, and in America we have literally thousands of horses being shipped to slaughter on a weekly basis who don't scare the bejeezus out of anyone. THAT's what's wrong with the horse business. THAT's why we have a problem "wasting" health, time and effort on horses that do scare people. It is heartbreaking to see the horses everyday we could help but we can't because we're wasting space on difficult horses.
    Why is it that a woman will forgive homicidal behavior in a horse, yet be highly critical of a man for leaving the toilet seat up?
    ~ Dave Barry



  4. #124
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    2,352

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    You made the most honorable and kind decision for that horse. He was lucky to have been placed in your care. I wish more people had the courage to make such difficult choices, given the information you provided us with in your first post.

    I think it is less important "who you are" on the BB, and more important what you did. Thank you for sharing this with us all. It is sad, and certainly not an enjoyable topic, but a necessary one.

    ETA: Thomas, I normally agree with your take on situations, but with this one I disagree; mainly for the reasons of safety for both the owners as well as the horse.

    Having seen a horse strike and kill (not instantly, but the impact was what was found as the cause of death) a trainer, I am a bit more understanding of those who believe there is no hope of a happy ending without severe injury or death. While it may be true that we do not have all the facts (it is the internet, after all!), I reply to posts as if what has been written is true unless anything posted strikes me as "concerning" - and this thread did not indicate that the OP was looking for an easy way out - I found her posts to be filled with concern for her safety and that of anyone else who handled the horse in question.

    I do not know what the situation would have looked like to me had I seen it in person. Perhaps I would be opposing her decision and angered by the lack of perceived effort being put into training this horse. I truly do not know. While I do not like euthanasia to be a "go-to" when a horse cannot be easily trained, I do not think it should be ruled-out.
    Last edited by Eye in the Sky; Apr. 6, 2010 at 06:43 PM. Reason: added content



  5. #125
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

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    I'm with you, SmartAlex. Funny, but I didn't read where anyone who suggested that the horse needed more training, offer to "save its life" and take it off the OP's hands to give it that training.

    OP, my heart goes out to you. It is an incredibly difficult and brave decision you've made. Ignore the naysayers and know that you've made the decision that was best for you and the horse.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  6. #126
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2007
    Location
    South of Georgia, North of Miami
    Posts
    1,118

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    You tried your best with this horse and made a knowledgeable decision. Sometimes we don't listen to that inner voice and I for one am always sorry when I don't. Your inner voice was saying there was something seriously off with this horse and you did what you thought was right. It's not always a popular decision but it is a brave one.

    {{{hugs}}} and may the horse find peace. It sounds like he was miserable here on earth.

    Are you going to do an autopsy? Out of curiosity I for one would like to know if he had a brain tumor. Maybe a vet college would take him for study (after death of course).



  7. #127
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
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    4,266

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    An autopsy would be very interesting and educational.

    Best wishes to you with this tough decision.



  8. #128
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Thoughts and prayers for everyone involved ~ Godpseed Big Horse.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  9. #129
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
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    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
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    12,079

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    As I said about my lab I took in... you WERE his *second* chance.

    You GAVE him a chance.

    YOU TRIED.

    I will at least assume honesty and take at face value your experience. In fact, I daresay it is sometimes the less experienced who think they can fix everything. Some of us know we can't.

    I'm sorry you had to come to this point.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  10. #130
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
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    2,165

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post

    I'm going to presume this horse in in America, and in America we have literally thousands of horses being shipped to slaughter on a weekly basis who don't scare the bejeezus out of anyone. THAT's what's wrong with the horse business. THAT's why we have a problem "wasting" health, time and effort on horses that do scare people. It is heartbreaking to see the horses everyday we could help but we can't because we're wasting space on difficult horses.
    After I put down a "dangerous" horse with neurologic issues, I felt really sad about the whole thing. I didn't regret doing it, but it was hard to be the one to make that decision.

    About a week after I put him down, I got a call from a friend who has a TB farm, about a young, sound and healthy broodmare who's owners were planning to euthanize her. Why? She had no training and wasn't financially viable as a broodmare. They didn't even want to give her away because the last horse they had given away ended up going directly to auction. I wish this was an unusual type of phone call for me to get, but I get a fair number of them.

    Anyway, for whatever reason, this time my mouth said yes and my hands picked up the keys. A year later she had morphed into a glossy, elegant and mannerly riding horse. I had just put up an ad to sell her, but a close family member who hadn't been able to ride for years due to difficult personal circumstances came for a visit, rode her a couple times and fell in love with her. It was a perfect match like you've never seen.

    I gave her the horse and inwardly asked for forgiveness for some of the tough calls I've made, because often we don't know for sure--we'll never know for sure--that we are making the right decision unless we wait until it is too late. Yes, the right decision is obvious to everyone after someone has been badly injured or after the horse has seriously hurt its own self, or in the case of a sick horse after it gets to the point that a naturally stoic animal is blatantly suffering. But anytime you euthanize a horse before that, you have to live with a measure of doubt.



  11. #131
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    Alabama
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    416

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    Bless you- right decisions can be hard to make sometimes.



  12. #132
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    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Vermont
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    Sorry for the brief thread hijack, but:

    Quote Originally Posted by MunchkinsMom View Post
    IMO there are some animals that also suffer from mental illness (why should we humans be the only ones), and because we have no drugs to help the animals get past it, it is kinder to let them go via a gentle death.

    Oh, we absolutely *do* have drugs to help the animals "get past it". Many of the same psychopharmaceuticals used for humans are frequently successfully used in veterinary medicine as well. Pony Prozac.



  13. #133
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Quote Originally Posted by citydog View Post
    Sorry for the brief thread hijack, but:




    Oh, we absolutely *do* have drugs to help the animals "get past it". Many of the same psychopharmaceuticals used for humans are frequently successfully used in veterinary medicine as well. Pony Prozac.

    LOL, but look how often it fails on people...
    Quote Originally Posted by fargaloo View Post
    Do you not understand how asking "why now?" is EXACTLY part of the reason why assault victims feel silenced?



  14. #134
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    May. 3, 2006
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    11,568

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    LOL, but look how often it fails on people...
    Maybe we should kill them and save the risk of failure and the effort of medicating at all



  15. #135
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
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    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    Maybe we should kill them and save the risk of failure and the effort of medicating at all
    If they have a history of unpredictably violent behaviour that has proven to harm others, maybe we should.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  16. #136
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    Maybe we should kill them and save the risk of failure and the effort of medicating at all
    Well, my Mom said something like that, and she has 30 some years working in the nut house under her belt. Some crazy cna't be fixed.
    Quote Originally Posted by fargaloo View Post
    Do you not understand how asking "why now?" is EXACTLY part of the reason why assault victims feel silenced?



  17. #137
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,467

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas_1 View Post
    Maybe we should kill them and save the risk of failure and the effort of medicating at all
    Well I certainly wouldn't own or breed one who couldn't cut the mustard sans meds such that he was minimally safe and useful. Really, one is doing no future people or horses any favors to produce more of these. Just because its possible to modify a mind via pharmaceuticals does not mean you want to create one that comes with a prescription attached.....unless you own stock in a large pharmaceutical company.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  18. #138
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,278

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    rip horse for the short life that you was on this earth
    and i hope you have a happier life on the other side rianbow bridge
    where you be loved by others that you so depsreately seeked whilse on this side but never got amen



  19. #139
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    Apr. 2, 2010
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    11

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    He may not have had love before he came here, but he certainly has received only love and compassion at our farm.



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