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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,311

    Default Very forward horse... Please!!! need advice

    So I am starting to ride my horse and get him back in shape. I am very limited in what I can do pretty much just walk and trot, but only a couple of minutes. Simply at the walk Forrest is almost racing around the ring. I will admit he just moved Saturday, so hes still interested in things around him. But I try to get his attention every time by changing direction or making a circle. I have worked a lot on halt/walk transitions. Every time he speeds up I halt, make him stand and walk on and repeat over and over.

    The trot I just cant seem to get him to relax. When I do circles I can get him to bend, frame up, and slow down for about 50% of the circle then when we come around his head shoots up and speeds up. I also only get a decent response when I use the part of the ring closest to the barn.

    Does anyone have suggestions on what I can do? All we do is fight and I'm worried I am or will make it worse. He has a very supple and soft mouth and I switched bits on him, but honestly I think he was happier about, but still VERY forward.

    Thanks!
    Forrest Gump, 15, OTTB
    Little Bit Indian, 27, TB

    Owner of Spur of the Moment, Custom made spur straps! Find us on Facebook



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    32,853

    Default

    Fresh horses don't know nuthin 'bout walk and trot. Expecting something there that is not really reasonable.

    How is your turnout situation? Diet? Is it you that has the limitations on what can be done or the horse?
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,311

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    Fresh horses don't know nuthin 'bout walk and trot. Expecting something there that is not really reasonable.

    How is your turnout situation? Diet? Is it you that has the limitations on what can be done or the horse?
    He is out on grass and free choice hay 24/7. Gets 2lbs of performance feed. Im just wondering what I can work on to get him to relax more, he also seems to have a big case of ADD.
    Forrest Gump, 15, OTTB
    Little Bit Indian, 27, TB

    Owner of Spur of the Moment, Custom made spur straps! Find us on Facebook



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    691

    Default

    My horse speeds up when he's unbalanced. It is very likely since he's just coming back to work he just doesn't have the muscling to stay round and slower for that long, so he speeds up to run away from it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Are *you* the one who can't do more than trotting for a few minutes, or is that some limitation of the horse (rehabbing from an injury or something)?

    Depending on your answer to that, here's another possible suggestion. But only you know your horse, and whether this is an option or not.

    *Some* horses calm down when you let them move out. Others will simply use the moving out as an excuse to get even more worked up. I have one of each of those kinds of horses. The mare needs me to keep her slow if she's to stay calm. But, if my gelding is being really forward, all I have to do is let him trot around (extended trot, really asking him for "oomph") for a while until I feel him start to relax and come back to earth. If your horse is like my gelding, and if the horse isn't the one that physically can't go for very long, you can either try letting him move out under saddle, or on the lunge/in the round pen to work off some of that excess energy.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    looser rein, sit back.
    mykidshavefourlegs.blogspot.com



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    Default

    Again, is it him or you that can only walk or trot? IME if they are fresh? they want to go and you can't talk them out of it or get them to relax, just too much energy.

    The turn out is good but most of them really don't want to work themselves that hard, keeps them fitter but they can still be full of it under saddle.

    You need to direct that energy. IF he does not have any restriction on activity, I'd put him in sidereins, not drapey loose either, tight enough to make light contact and do something. Lunge him so he can steam off a little but remain under control-and that teaches them to balance themselves. Maybe 10 minutes each way mostly trot then you get on and walk them out a bit then proceed with your regularly schedualed session. probably only need to do this after a day or days off, not daily.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,311

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ClassyRide View Post
    Are *you* the one who can't do more than trotting for a few minutes, or is that some limitation of the horse (rehabbing from an injury or something)?

    Depending on your answer to that, here's another possible suggestion. But only you know your horse, and whether this is an option or not.

    *Some* horses calm down when you let them move out. Others will simply use the moving out as an excuse to get even more worked up. I have one of each of those kinds of horses. The mare needs me to keep her slow if she's to stay calm. But, if my gelding is being really forward, all I have to do is let him trot around (extended trot, really asking him for "oomph") for a while until I feel him start to relax and come back to earth. If your horse is like my gelding, and if the horse isn't the one that physically can't go for very long, you can either try letting him move out under saddle, or on the lunge/in the round pen to work off some of that excess energy.

    It is him that is restricted. He was really underweight to muscle wasting stage. We finally have him back to normal but no muscle so I am very limited in what I can do with him due to that. I don't want to over do it and cause an injury. I plan on adding additional trot minutes each week as he builds up. But for now I just walk him for 10-15 minutes to warm up, work on bending, figure 8s, serpentine, pole work, etc. Then trot for a couple minutes about 1-2 minutes each direction with lots of walking in between. When all said in done I hack him out in our fields with slight inclines to cool him off in just to get some hill work in there without over doing it.
    Forrest Gump, 15, OTTB
    Little Bit Indian, 27, TB

    Owner of Spur of the Moment, Custom made spur straps! Find us on Facebook



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    367

    Default

    Check your feed. Make sure what you are using to put weight and muscle on him isn't also making him FULL of energy. There are plenty of feeds and products on the market that will get him in shape without also making him a basketcase.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    32,853

    Default

    Ok, that makes a difference.

    Is he just walking or trotting fast? Or trying to upshift to a canter?

    If it's the former, just walking and trotting fasssst? It's annoying but you can live with it. Let him walk as fast as he wants, at the trot, give him a little bit to go but drop to a walk-avoid harsh down transitions and too many halts. he just feels good, he's not trying to be bad.

    This is probably going to get a little worse as he feels better and gets in better shape... I would try to get some lunging introduced if you can keep him from overdoing it. You will be needing it soon and, used PROPERLY it is a good training aid.

    IME, when the weather warms up, most of this takes care of itself...just watch those cold or windy days though until it does.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



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