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  1. #1
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    Jan. 26, 2009
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    Default Exercises for the rider that likes to "stand" over fences

    Does anyone have any good exercises (on flat/over fences) that would help a rider that hasn't learned to bend at the hips and instead stands in their stirrups?

    Their horse is a really "heavy" jumper. Likes to leave long, lands heavy in the bridle. That is a different story, but the rider hasn't figured out how to handle getting to the base of the jump. Often the horse will jump beautifully out of stride as well (like a hunter) but rider still stands straight up. Stirrup length isn't a problem. This is a very common problem I am assuming, just curious how you all have dealt with it.



  2. #2
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    Jun. 30, 2000
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    Minnesota
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    Wink

    hmmmm....What about a 3-element gymnastic, like a bounce to a 1-stride. You'd have to bend over the first one to stay on for elements 2 and 3?

    Or start more simply, you mention she has a hard time getting to the base? Set a take off pole in front, horse will do the work and rider can start to feel it and hopefully eventually see it.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 27, 2000
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    Default

    If she's strong and stable enough, take her stirrups away and have her do rails and little jumps (even gymnastics) w/out them. It's nearly impossible for a rider to put themselves in that artificial "standing in the stirrups" position when they have no stirrups to stand on.
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  4. #4
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    May. 1, 2006
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    Tampa, FL
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    Default

    If she is like me then her 2 point is not very effective either. I had (sometimes still do) a tendency to just stand in my stirrups for 2 point. What is working for me is my trainer telling me to think about balancing a glass of water (or wine) on my butt while I'm in 2 point. This gets my hip angle where it is supposed to be. Then it is more difficult to stand in my stirrups without falling on the horses neck. It really helps to get my center of balance back over the center of my horse. So, when we jump I think "Push your butt back".
    I also second having her jump without stirrups if she is strong enough. If not, then she needs to spend more time in 2 point on the flat.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
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    1,934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fiction View Post
    If she's strong and stable enough, take her stirrups away and have her do rails and little jumps (even gymnastics) w/out them. It's nearly impossible for a rider to put themselves in that artificial "standing in the stirrups" position when they have no stirrups to stand on.
    ^^^ this!

    OR if you have a real good steady-eddie to work with, low grids with no reins and eyes closed. if this won't teach you to feel the horse's jump and let it put you in position, nothing will! i need a refresher of this exercise myself.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    PONY'TUDE



  6. #6
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    Apr. 28, 2005
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    Chicago
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    Default

    I've heard trainers teach little kids to press their belly button to the saddle. Also, trotting in an overly exaggerated jumping position, with arms in a long crest release and back parallel to the horse's neck will help her develop a feel for closing her hip angle. Another idea is having her think about pointing her butt toward the horse's tail or back of the saddle.
    ~ Citizens for a Kinder, Gentler COTH...our mantra: Be nice. ~



  7. #7
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    Jan. 27, 2003
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    CA
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    Default

    You say stirrup length isn't a problem, but I would bet they are at least a whole too long for jumping even if they are okay on the flat. Shortening stirrups makes it harder to stand without tipping forward and makes you want to squat rather than stand to feel more secure. It becomes your body's natural reaction to maintain balance.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  8. #8
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    Jan. 26, 2009
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    Default

    RugBug - guarantee it isn't the stirrups. I have checked and doubled checked and check every time she rides. We've tried them at and above her ankle, they are not too long.

    Thanks guys. All things I was thinking so hopefully will be able to put them to good use.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 17, 2009
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    Wandering the universe...
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    Default

    Also maybe try having her go to the fences already in two point, and then grab mane to keep her body from going up into "standing" position over the fence. This worked for me, but if the horse is heavy to the fences already it may work better on a different horse who doesn't pull down...
    Different flavors of crazy, but totally NUTS. You know its true. - GreyHunterHorse

    http://showertimecontemplations.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2009
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    CA to Costa Rica to WI
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    Default

    I've had (and still sometimes have) this problem. 3 things that help me.

    1) Grabbing a finger full of mane. The trick is then to keep your arms strong and allow the horse's neck to pull your forward
    2) Gymnastics. I like 3 fences in a row 1 stride apart (a full stride, not bounce). The first one was never good, but then since I don't have to worry about the horse very much over the second two, I can really think about the bend. That was the first time I really understood how it was supposed to feel.
    3) Think "touch the back on the saddle" with my butt. You can't really do that standing up.

    Also, have you ever moved her stirrups up a whole or two just to see what happens? Using the ankle is a good estimate, but sometimes due to the horse or conformation (of the horse or rider) that changes. It's possible that moving them up will help her get a feel for it, then they can be moved back to the "proper" length.

    Good luck!
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Fourteen Months Living and Working in Costa Rica



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    15,268

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TSHEventing View Post
    Does anyone have any good exercises (on flat/over fences) that would help a rider that hasn't learned to bend at the hips and instead stands in their stirrups?

    Their horse is a really "heavy" jumper. Likes to leave long, lands heavy in the bridle. That is a different story, but the rider hasn't figured out how to handle getting to the base of the jump. Often the horse will jump beautifully out of stride as well (like a hunter) but rider still stands straight up. Stirrup length isn't a problem. This is a very common problem I am assuming, just curious how you all have dealt with it.
    you need a sj trianer or eventer trianer
    to do some flat work with you the pole work then grid work then small courses
    join a rding club or pc club or go to some clinics



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    45

    Default

    I was asked to touch the horse's neck with my breast. (I think in a kid's case the "belly button to the saddle" would work better))
    I also needed stirrups up two holes. Ankle lenght was too long.
    The "breast touch" helped me big time.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
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    400

    Default

    I agree with a lot of these suggestions.
    I definitely think working with no reins will help. Put her on a lunge line if nec., and have her stretch her arms straight out to the sides as if she were making a letter "T" when she goes into her two point. Without your hands as a balance point it's hard to stand up through a jump.

    Also, take yarn and tie it in her horses mane at a good automatic release point. Make her grab mane at the yarn every time she jumps. This will make her reach forward and help keep her from standing up.



  14. #14
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    Jun. 12, 2007
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    Westchester County, NY
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    Default

    I've posted this here before, but its one of my favorites. You can't ask a kid to assume a requested position over a jump if they can't accomplish it on the flat. Have her walk around in a good two-point, then ask her to assume a very exaggerated jumping position (butt to the back of the saddle, belly button down to the pommel, hands up to the ears). Then have her trot and do x number of strides of each. Doing a few strides of sitting trot, then rising trot, then 2-point, then exaggerated jump position, then back again will teach her to close and open the hip angle. Then you can get her in exaggerated jump position and ask her to approach a small gymnastic (x-rails) and hold that position from approach until you say stop (well after the last fence).



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