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  1. #1
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    Feb. 1, 2009
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    Default Need Help - Hunter or Jumper?

    I have a horse I'm trying to find a new home for. His previous owner did jumping with him but that's all I know about his past experience. I'm completely ignorant when it comes to jumping and trying to learn in order to market him to the right people.

    So... jumpers try to go around the course as fast as possible without any errors, and hunters do lower jumps but are also judged on form and equitation? Is that right? What about hunters who actually go out and hunt - is there a separate name/category for this type of horse?

    How do you know which discipline your horse is best suited for? If anyone has the time and inclination to take a look and give me their opinion I'd be grateful. I should mention that prior to these videos he hadn't been jumped in a couple of years.

    You can see videos on YouTube if you search for "LockeeB". Thanks!
    Last edited by coymackerel; Mar. 31, 2010 at 07:20 PM. Reason: added more info



  2. #2
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    Watched the videos... he looks more jumper than hunter to me. He has nice form over fences, but more knee action (on the flat) than desired for a hunter.

    Personally, I'd market him as a children's/aa jumper.

    He'd probably do ok showing hunter's at the local level. He wanted to root a little after landing from some jumps (which is not desirable, especially in hunters), but he hadn't been worked in 6 mo (according to the person talking on the video), so he may just have been a little fresh/silly. Couldn't see if he has a flying change, so that will also determine how he'd do in hunters.

    Horse looks like a very good boy that would be fun and safe for someone.


    What was up with the person on the one video saying "Nice/very good" after the rider just buried him and chipped the jump.? (At about 1min13sec).



  3. #3
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    Your general perception of both is loosely correct. IMO, a jumper can easily be a hunter, and vice versa, if they have the right temperment and jumping style. That being said, there are distinct matches for each discipline and sometimes it takes getting their feet wet in each one to know exactly what they will excel in.

    For a jumper, you want a horse who is very adjustable and agile. Jumper courses are notably more complicated and ask more of the horse between fences than hunter courses. You do not want a horse to is lazy with his body to do jumpers as he will knock poles and be a danger to himself and the rider. Well, I guess that's true for any discipline! Also, jumpers do have levels with higher fences than hunters, so his athleticism, ability, and the ability of his rider will determine how far he can go.

    Hunters are NOT necessarily quieter horses than jumpers but they are "fancier." (For lack of a better word.) The judging in hunters is focused entirely on the horse's rhythm and form over fences. The courses TEND to be less complex than jumper courses, however I have seen a lot of working hunter classes lately that are asking a lot more and they are so fun to watch! But the main rule of thumb for hunters is that the horse must have great form over fences, a really round jump where he/she really uses the back to round up and over the fence. A jumper horse who jumps very hard and round may be hard to stick with and also will not be as quick in the air.

    There is also equitation, eventing, foxhunting, etc etc etc. There are a lot of disciplines for a horse to compete in, and there are so many lower levels in each one that a horse who is a decent athlete could potentially do well in any division at its lower levels. It will take some time and the right rider to figure out exactly what a horse is meant to do.

    I won't get into conformation and breeding because I don't really know anything about judging a horse's potential based on that. And I don't pretend to be a pro on any of this, but I have been riding for quite awhile in the H/J ring and have had the privilege of observing a lot of talented horses in action in their respective disciplines. So my opinions are simply opinions but I think they come from a lot of observing and learning.



  4. #4
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    I didn't see the video before I posted that last comment.
    I agree with jetsmom, I would definitely market him as a jumper! He is very cute, you can tell he hasn't worked in awhile but I think with some more finesse he could be cute!
    Last edited by mustangsal85; Mar. 31, 2010 at 08:14 PM. Reason: typo



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    What was up with the person on the one video saying "Nice/very good" after the rider just buried him and chipped the jump.? (At about 1min13sec).
    I saw that! Hehe the video person thought that was the best jump of the whole session apparently! Although I think maybe she was happy he went over the jump when he was obviously a little hesitant, going back to when she said he hasn't worked in several months. But the rider seemed like she rushed him down that line a little so really he was probably looking at it because he was thinking "ummm how the F am I supposed to find a distance to this?!" But at least he jumped honestly.



  6. #6
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    Nov. 11, 2007
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    Default

    Based on the videos, he appears to be more of a children's or amateur adult jumper or equitation horse. Most people will want him fit in order to be able to try him and get an accurate impression. Does he have a flying change? Could also be sold as a local show hunter although he probably would not win the hacks (flat class). Seems like a fairly quiet boy, except for the rooting after the jumps. Chipped that last oxer well and didn't complain so he doesn't seem to care if his rider messes up. Good luck!

    As far as marketing a horse as a foxhunter, they need to be quiet x-country and on the trails, so if you don't know about his personality in those situations, I would avoid advertising him in that way.



  7. #7
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    That was me running my mouth. TOLD you I didn't know anything about jumping - I was so thrilled to see him going over the jumps that it all looked good to me.

    Hello YouTube audio swap! And thank you all for your help!



  8. #8
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    I think he could be a nice Eq. horse!
    My CANTER cutie Chip and IHSA shows!
    http://www.youtube.com/kheit86



  9. #9
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    I'll preface this by saying I don't know anything about it (besides what I pick up on the Hunter/Jumper forum), but I also think he would make a cute Equitation horse! He seems very quiet and smooth, but doesn't strike me as particularly 'handy.' He has a very nice jump. I really like him

    Then again, I'm an eventer, so I like his movement... no idea about what Eq horses do in the hack, or if it's even a major turn-off.
    The wind of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears. ~ Arabian Proverb



  10. #10
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    I can't find the video All I find is a nice TB jumper, where is it? Can someone post the link?
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  11. #11
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    Ooh he's beautiful! I personally see him going either way, hunters or jumpers. He looks like he has a nice big stride and finds the fences easily enough. If it were me I'd probably list him as being suitable for either hunters, jumpers or eq, because he looks like he could do any of them with some finishing touches.
    Quote Originally Posted by barka.lounger View Post
    u get big old crop and bust that nags ass the next time it even slow down.

    we see u in gp ring in no time.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    Watched the videos... he looks more jumper than hunter to me. He has nice form over fences, but more knee action (on the flat) than desired for a hunter.
    Really? Do you have a video that I may watch of acceptable knee action? I didn't think it was that bad.



  13. #13
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    Really? Do you have a video that I may watch of acceptable knee action? I didn't think it was that bad.
    Her's a video of a good mover.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE7Bdh73qPA

    The Op's horse is not a bad mover, but just has more knee action than is desirable for rated hunter classes. He'd be fine at most local show type hunter classes.



  15. #15
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    Default interesting

    Jet - Are you talking about how the horse in the video you posted moves his front legs as a whole - kind of swings them out instead of lifts? Is that the movement you want during the flat portion of the work?

    This is interesting - whole new world.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by coymackerel View Post
    Jet - Are you talking about how the horse in the video you posted moves his front legs as a whole - kind of swings them out instead of lifts? Is that the movement you want during the flat portion of the work?

    This is interesting - whole new world.
    Yep - that's the floaty, flat-kneed "daisy cutter" type of movement desired in a hunter class. The reason is justified as having to do with a horse on a hunt may have to go for a long time, conservation of energy, blah blah. I think the actual reason is it was a preference by some people and grew to be the standard. But I tend to question other people's claims at having a logical explanation for things.

    Bending the knees more doesn't make a horse a lower quality mover - it just makes the horse less suitable as a hunter, at least for more competitive shows.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    Bending the knees more doesn't make a horse a lower quality mover - it just makes the horse less suitable as a hunter, at least for more competitive shows.
    Thanks; those two videos were educational, especially side by side. Growing up with Morgans, I never thought a TB could have too much action.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    Thanks; those two videos were educational, especially side by side. Growing up with Morgans, I never thought a TB could have too much action.
    I can understand that! Growing up with quarter horses, I never thought a TB could have flat knees. (My TB definitely has too much action... but also has a higher neck set anyway and a very uphill build/movement... so he's now a dressage horse, and a very good mover for that!)



  19. #19
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    Thats the videos I found, just wanted to be sure. I didn't hear anyone talking like others said He is NICE, I really like him! Send him my way and we'll do dressage Anyways he'd make a nice jumper, agree that he could do ok on the C rated and local shows as a hunter but not rated. I see him as an eventer myself though. I'd take him out someone to school cross country and see how he does. If he takes it well start some dressage work (looks like he has had some already) and try that even. Good luck
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  20. #20
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    I think he is adorable as well. If he has a lead change, in a regular work program I think he would make a cute hunter for the local shows.



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