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  1. #1
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    Dec. 6, 2004
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    Default Cost of Novice Mature Adult Lessons.?..

    I would love some feedback on this. Is there a difference in price range for those riders that are in a competitive show barn who lesson perhaps 2 or 3 x a week to those that are mature adults(40+ range) that just want to start out - purely flat lessons which are confidence building and help them to become an independent recreational rider?.

    An A circuit h/j trainer in our area, suggested the price should be the same. $50 with own horse for private and $45 for semi private. I disagreed so my new trainer asked me what she should charge. I said I would ask around for the going rate for english flat lessons for recreational bound riders. We would not be bound for the jumper ring nor the dressage ring in the near future.

    What would a 45min.semi private be? 30 minute private?



  2. #2
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    Jul. 22, 2004
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    Atco, NewJersey
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    Default

    To me, you are paying someone for their knowledge and expertise, which should cost the same whether they have to use their jumping knowledge, or their teaching to steer knowledge. Would you pay a music teacher less because you don't intend to advance beyond learning "Mary had a little lamb"? They are still spending time, the same amount of time, on you.

    In fact, one could argue that teaching beginners is more taxing then less. With an experienced rider you are not teaching a step by step how to constantly. They know, and remember, all the small details that an instructor will undoubtedly have to remind a new rider of over and over again.

    Also price of lesson will depend on location, and if you need him/her to specialize in HJ, or want a show barn, or.... etc etc.
    Cupid - 2001 to 2006 I miss you everyday!
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  3. #3
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Plainview, MN
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    Default

    I teach English saddle seat riding, but our rates are the same no matter what your skill level or end intentions. We actually get quite a few people who want to learn to ride just for recreational purposes or a special holiday trip. The beginner adults are often the hardest riders on the school horses, not that they are trying to be, just that they are. As a tradeoff they are usually the best listeners. Other ages and skill levels have their own ups and downs. We charge $35 for a 30 min lesson and all of our lessons are private and on a school horse.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
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    Westchester County, NY
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    Default

    Yup. You are using the same hour (or half hour) of the trainers time whether you want to learn to jump or steer. If you don't want to pay for the more experienced trainer- I'm sure there are other barns that will cater more to that.

    The only time I have ever seen different prices was at a barn with multiple trainers. There were new trainers (generally college kids) who taught beginners only- and they charged one price. Then there were people you would typically think of as trainers, with years of experience and a show record- and they charged a different price.

    I've actually also seen the opposite - regular clients who lesson 3 times per week get a 'package' rate of slightly less expensive lessons for being good customers and guaranteeing the trainer a steady income for the month.



  5. #5
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    Dec. 6, 2004
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    In The Heart of the Village
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    Default

    On the contrary I have found that there are beginner music teachers and then upper level teachers as the degree of technique and complexity of the music develops. Only speaking from experience, a music teacher at the grade 8-10 royal conservatory level, has always charged more, their credentials are higher. At the university level it is even higher. Often the beginner music teachers were music students at university. A music prof wouldn't touch a rank beginner.

    We have levels of Rider Instruction.. surely a level 1 Instructor would not charge the same as a level 2 or 3? My experience is a level 2 or 3 riding instructor won't teach beginner and recreational riders. These teachers have invested a lot of time and money in gaining their higher level of instruction certificates.

    I understand where you are coming from teaching beginner anything - when I was a teacher, there often was the sentiment that kindergarten/primary teachers should be paid what high school math and science specialists be paid....didn't happen.
    So any ideas what the going rate is for novice adult lessons?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2010
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    106

    Default

    You are paying for TIME. You are taking their time and learning the same base of knowledge as those more advanced than you. You get not discount for being a beginner rider. If you would like a cheaper rate, find a cheaper less reputable trainer.

    $45 is an average rate for the trainer you described.



  7. #7
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    Jun. 19, 1999
    Location
    Averill Park NY and Citra Fl
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    5,578

    Default

    Once the piano/flute/violin lesson is over (whatever level) the instrument goes back to the closet (or whatever)...no feeding, shoeing, cleaning, vet costs, etc etc....the horse for a "show lesson" costs the same a the horse for the "recreational lesson". I am not sure I understand the premise?
    The thing about smart people, is they look like crazy people, to dumb people.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2008
    Location
    Unionville, PA
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    94

    Default

    It would be rare to find an instructor that has different rates depending on the level of the rider. It just does not make sense. Yes, there are plenty of instructors that don't teach the type of rider that you are speaking of, but that could also be that they simply don't have anything for that person to ride. There are also plenty of instructors that only teach begginer - novice riders.

    I think that you pay for their knowledge. If you are looking for someone that teaches begginers and the rec rider, do not go to someone that specializes in competition horses and riders. And do not expect that person to have a special rate because you decided to. On the flip side, if you are a rec rider that just wants the knowledge of someone that is a competition trainer, by all means go for it, but expect to pay for it.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2004
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    In The Heart of the Village
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    Default

    Thanks Renae for the $35 suggestion on your school horse. that is incredibly reasonable.

    Up here that would be the charge if the rider brought their own horse or their own lease horse. If one were to use your school horse there would be an additional $15-$20 surcharge.

    Instructors are charging a lease fee on their school horse as well as for the lesson.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2004
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    The middle
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Villager View Post
    An A circuit h/j trainer in our area, suggested the price should be the same. $50 with own horse for private and $45 for semi private. I disagreed so my new trainer asked me what she should charge. I said I would ask around for the going rate for english flat lessons for recreational bound riders.
    Your new trainer is asking you how much she should charge?

    Strange

    Has she ever taught or trained before?



  11. #11
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    Default

    Harryson-
    I guess I didnt make it clear. My trainer is just starting out. A few of us ageing re-riders and riders are her first clients. We are helping her build up her clientelle.

    And likewise as her reputation and clientelle grows, her prices will go up as her time will be more valuable and she can even pick and choose her clients.



  12. #12
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    Nov. 18, 2004
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    Catonsville, MD
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    Default

    Key question - where are you?
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  13. #13
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    Jan. 24, 2000
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Villager View Post
    We have levels of Rider Instruction.. surely a level 1 Instructor would not charge the same as a level 2 or 3? My experience is a level 2 or 3 riding instructor won't teach beginner and recreational riders. These teachers have invested a lot of time and money in gaining their higher level of instruction certificates.
    This is correct. However, this has nothing to do with the skill level, goals or "dedication" (i.e., number of lessons per week) of the student. If a, let's say, "Level 3" instructor is willing to teach a novice, said novice should expect to pay the same as a more advanced, competitive rider.

    I teach beginner-to-(what I consider) intermediate, and specialize in working with fearful riders. My rate is $45 for a private on a student's horse; if you want to use one of mine, that is an additional $10. Average duration is 45 minutes-1 hour, though slightly shorter or longer lessons may happen. That is the rate I charge to ALL students, from the tiniest tot, to the rankest adult newbie, to the higher-level-than-me rider who has been recommended to me due to fear issues, to even the freakishly talented teen that is soon riding rings around me. It doesn't matter if the rider is casual or competitive, rides once a week, more than that or less than that. I have put a value on my time, my rather extensive education and my ability to teach, and that is the cost. I put the same solid foundation and well-filled toolbox of skills on each and every student, regardless of where they start from and where they want to go.

    Likewise, my superb trainer's rate is $85/private lesson, regardless of the skill level of the rider. And yes, she, like quite a few upper-level trainers, will indeed teach a novice. Depending on her schedule, she may route them to me or another person who specializes in starting riders out, but she is certainly willing to teach anyone who sincerely wants to be taught. This is not at all unusual, in my experience.

    Prices also can vary by region, though not as much as one might expect. Moving from a wealthier, very metropolitan area to a less economically blessed area, I lowered my price by $10 to align more with what the market here would bear. Your trainer needs to look at other programs serving similar clients to those she wants to attract and set her prices accordingly. Specific prices depend on many factors, location, amount of competition, the specific client base targeted, etc. From a business perspective, I would advise strongly against setting different prices for different "levels" of students; this will appear from the outside to be capricious, it will be difficult for potential new students to get a feel for where this developing trainer lies in the grand scheme of things, and can end up being self-limiting, as newbies (or the parents of newbies) come in at the low rate and then drop out when they reach a point where the rate goes up.

    Is that at all helpful?
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  14. #14
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    Jun. 12, 2007
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    Westchester County, NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Villager View Post
    Harryson-
    I guess I didnt make it clear. My trainer is just starting out. A few of us ageing re-riders and riders are her first clients. We are helping her build up her clientelle.

    And likewise as her reputation and clientelle grows, her prices will go up as her time will be more valuable and she can even pick and choose her clients.
    Whoa- this is a totally different question than you asked above (or I got lost). What I got above is that you wanted to ride with an A circuit H/J trainer, but wanted a lower price than she charges her other students because you aren't destined for the show ring. If thats not the situation, then please clarify.

    If it is as your last post states, then yes- I would expect this new trainer to charge a lower rate than an experienced H/J trainer. In my area $50 per half hour private with use a lesson horse would be pretty reasonable.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,780

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Love My TB Consent View Post
    To me, you are paying someone for their knowledge and expertise, which should cost the same whether they have to use their jumping knowledge, or their teaching to steer knowledge. Would you pay a music teacher less because you don't intend to advance beyond learning "Mary had a little lamb"? They are still spending time, the same amount of time, on you.

    In fact, one could argue that teaching beginners is more taxing then less. With an experienced rider you are not teaching a step by step how to constantly. They know, and remember, all the small details that an instructor will undoubtedly have to remind a new rider of over and over again.

    Also price of lesson will depend on location, and if you need him/her to specialize in HJ, or want a show barn, or.... etc etc.
    +1.

    G.



  16. #16
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    Dec. 6, 2004
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    In The Heart of the Village
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    Default

    joiedevie- et al- sorry to be unclear. I should have just stayed with the simple question-
    "What do barns charge for a private lesson and a semi private lesson"

    Given these Facts:
    -trainer starting out,-- we are her first clients in riding lessons

    -we are re riders, novices, over 50, who just want solid flat lessons to build confidence , balance, control

    -we are bringing our own horses



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
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    Default

    Around here you couldn't get a thirty minute private lesson with an A circuit trainer for those prices, no matter what level you rode at.

    A trainer's charge is for their time and expertise. Someone new to teaching and training will charge less per hour than someone who has more experience or a bigger resume. However, the rate is the rate, whether the student is a rank beginner or someone heading to the Maclay finals.

    I live in an area full of BNT's, and expect to pay somewhere in the neighborhood of $125 for a lesson. The VBNT that I currently ride with is happy to teach newbie riders and is excellent at starting them off with a great foundation. Another very good trainer that I work with charges $65 per lesson. She also teaches beginners. Both also have a bunch of successful, actively showing riders on the A circuit.

    A barn that offers multiple trainers may well charge more for the head trainer than for a younger, less experienced assistant. But the charge depends on the TRAINER'S resume and expertise, not the student's.
    **********
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  18. #18
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    Default

    You are paying for the trainer's time. You pay what the rate is for a LESSON. Who cares if you're a walk-trotter or a 3' 6" jumper? It's really presumptuous to think you should pay less, IMHO.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  19. #19
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    May. 25, 2006
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    Vermont
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    Default

    As everyone else here has stated you pay for the time of that trainer. The cost associated with that time includes a lot of overhead. If you have ever owned a business that will make perfect sense to you. The analogy with the music instructor is not a good one as the music instructor does not have the same amount of overhead as a trainer/instructor with lesson horses.



  20. #20
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    around here $45-80 per 45 min lesson, for a not-too-specialized trainer whose students tend to be pleasure riders or non-competitive.



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