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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2009
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    504

    Default Switching from daily wormer to paste

    So my horse had been enrolled in the Preventicare program, getting daily Strongid and the twice yearly paste wormer (I think it was Quest or something, the vet gave it). Anyway, I decided not to enroll him again, and to switch to paste. I have maybe another month of Strongid left. Should I just worm him then with whatever I have for that time of year (I got one of those 1 year rotating paste wormer packs), or do something like the Quest now (usually he got it in the spring)? Also, horse is on stall rest and hasn't been turned out since October, so I doubt he's been exposed to anything, if that changes anything.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,664

    Default

    Your best bet is to have a fecal done the day you stop the DW. If it shows clean, then considering he's had Quest twice in the last year, just wait for the next "due date" for the Quest (I'd use Quest Plus do get tapeworms too, but personally I'd use Equimax instead of moxidectin). That will give you another 3 months of coverage. Wait 4 months and do another fecal and go from there.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2009
    Posts
    504

    Default

    No other thoughts?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,197

    Default

    Listen to JB. She knows a ton about worming.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2009
    Posts
    504

    Default

    One reason why I am switching to paste from the daily wormer was cost. Doing fecals will cost me way more money--vet fees, stable call, etc. I guess I will give him the Quest/Equimax when he would normally be due (which is in the next month or so I believe), and then continue with pastes. I'll also see what the vet thinks.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
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    Default

    Doing fecals can be more $$ up front, but in the end, it reduces your costs AND helps with the resistance issues.

    There is no point spending $$ on paste dewormers if there is nothing to kill. It wastes your $$ and it leads to more/increased resistance issues.

    Your vet should be thinking along the same lines That is what the last couple of years' worth of research is indicating - deworm less, but deworm smarter.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2009
    Posts
    504

    Default

    Stable call is $90 + the cost for the fecal, so I'd be spending like $400+ per year doing fecals vs. $30/year on paste. That's 12 years of paste right there. No way that would be saving me any money! Not trying to be a pain--I understand why to do fecals, but there comes a point where my wallet needs to take over.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,664

    Default

    You don't have to do fecals 3-4 times a year. You'd do one right before the next deworming. If it's clean, go another cycle and check again. If it's STILL clean, no need to check for 6 months. In that time you may want to use Equimax (or Quest Plus if that's your weapon of choice) after the first freeze since your fecals won't show tapeworms. Then, particularly if you've used Quest, you won't need another fecal for another 6 months/in the Spring. If THAT is clear, then you're program works, you can do QP or Equimax once or twice a year, and do 1 fecal in late Summer/early Fall.

    If that still bothers, you, then you can see how using Quest Plus twice a year works. However, I wouldn't use Quest twice a year, I'd use Equimax for one of those.. Even though moxidectin and ivermectin are in the same class, you can help avoid some of the resistance issues by rotating between them.

    I wouldn't have the vet come out just to do a fecal. Combine that with him/her coming to do shots. Or, many County Extension Agencies will do fecals as well - some for free, some for $10 or so. It just requires you dropping off the sample.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2009
    Posts
    186

    Default

    Why would you pay a farm call for a fecal? We usually just take a sample to the office and they just charge us for a fecal- its actually pretty cheap and easy.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2000
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    I didn't think vets did fecals on site--that's usually an office thing so no need to have the vet come out, just drop off the samples.
    Last edited by ponyjumper4; Mar. 30, 2010 at 12:51 PM. Reason: .



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,707

    Default

    I've never had the vet come out to do a fecal. Just grab a turd and put it in a baggie and drop it by the vets or ship directly to whoever is doing the lab work. It's $15-$20.

    I switched from daily to rotational in March (last year) and pretty much did exactly what JB proposed. Horse had no worms on fecal (well that the fecal picks up, but that's a whole different post).
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Posts
    425

    Default

    There any number of places you can ship samples to for less than the cost of a farm visit:

    Smartpak $18.95,
    Westgate Labs £9.50 per sample,
    Virginia VDACS,
    IDEXX Reference Labs...

    .



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,897

    Default

    Another vote for what JB said.
    I did my own research a while ago and found that many horses are naturally resistant to worms. By doing the testing you find out how resistant your horse is to worms. Also discovered that most worms are/become resistant to daily wormers. They do not even sell Strongid in my area because it is pointless thanks to a large racing industry and overuse. Think of it this way, if you find out that your horse is very worm resistant, you will save a lot of money in the long run by only worming twice a year. Plus you are not exposing your horse to more chemicals than it needs to be.
    I truly believe that many people are really grossed out with the thought of worms and therefore over worm their horses. In reality some level of parasites are part of normal heath in horses.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2009
    Posts
    504

    Default

    Thanks, I didn't realize how easy it was for the fecals. Definitely something to keep in mind.



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