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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2005
    Location
    Out in The Country
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    1,924

    Default To those who trim hooves...

    I have been trimming my horses since 2000. Took courses etc and did it myself because there were no barefoot trimmers around me in the desert where I lived.

    I live in TN now and the weather is brutal on their feet - we have 9 horses. It has been SO wet and muddy and as spring is sneaking in - their feet are growing a bit more and everyone is starting to look aweful.

    I use my skills to encourage the hooves to go concave but its like the feet are just not holding shape. Is it the weather or can someone give me a tip about how to get flat feet to go concave? I trim the bars, even the wall, tend to leave a lot of sole because they walk on them but try so hard to keep weight bearing off. But its like the hooves just are not strong enough. I am thinking I need to start terpentining everyone.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    37,322

    Default

    Need pictures
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    11,662

    Default

    Well, keep in mind too that the environment plays a big role. If they're constantly in soft mucky ground, you're going to have a different foot than if they're nice and dry on harder ground--no matter HOW you're trimming.

    How often are you trimming? One thing I've found that has helped me is to do it much more frequently...like a little touch up every two weeks.

    It's easier to stay AHEAD than it is to play catch up--especially when it's not costing you anything more than your time.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2008
    Location
    Windsor SC till Aug
    Posts
    1,410

    Default

    Ditto what BuddyRoo said. I had awesome feet in central TX. Moved to sandy GA soil with a lot of rain, i have to do feet every other week, even it its just a touch up. I still do not have the concavity i like, but they are sound on them. A friend of mine in OK hauled in gravel to put in the spots the horses stand/walk around on the most out in the pasture. It helped the feet stay a little dryer, helped her mud problem, wore the hooves down some... Overall, it was a help. I rent my place or else i would do the same.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2009
    Location
    Gladstone, Oregon
    Posts
    540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    Well, keep in mind too that the environment plays a big role. If they're constantly in soft mucky ground, you're going to have a different foot than if they're nice and dry on harder ground--no matter HOW you're trimming.

    How often are you trimming? One thing I've found that has helped me is to do it much more frequently...like a little touch up every two weeks.

    It's easier to stay AHEAD than it is to play catch up--especially when it's not costing you anything more than your time.
    Quote Originally Posted by butlerfamilyzoo View Post
    Ditto what BuddyRoo said. I had awesome feet in central TX. Moved to sandy GA soil with a lot of rain, i have to do feet every other week, even it its just a touch up. I still do not have the concavity i like, but they are sound on them. A friend of mine in OK hauled in gravel to put in the spots the horses stand/walk around on the most out in the pasture. It helped the feet stay a little dryer, helped her mud problem, wore the hooves down some... Overall, it was a help. I rent my place or else i would do the same.
    I don't have formal training, but I've been doing my own feet since I was 11.

    I don't do them much myself anymore since I have bad back problems now.

    I agree with these people here.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,140

    Default

    I have found, trimming my own 2 horses for going on 3 years now, that I fall into ruts with my trim. I don't want to say lazy, because I never do a half-assed job, but I get too "familiar" for lack of a better word. I trim my horses every 2-3 weeks and I really probably don't take off as much as I should frankly. I'm constantly backing up toes. I make headway, foot form improves a bit and I get 'okay' with how the trim is looking. And then slowly it sneaks back to 'oh crap, I don't like that' land. I don't self-criticize my work nearly enough.

    I get in to a rut where I say 'ok, this looks good' when it probably isn't quite good enough, but I'm so familiar with my horse's feet that it looks okay to me, at the time.

    did that make sense? lol!

    I was a much better trimmer when I was trimming a few horses, horses that weren't mine, because the unfamiliar feet were refreshing and new, a new puzzle to solve, and that kept my mind fresher.

    I think of it like riding one horse vs. riding several.
    Last edited by buck22; Mar. 7, 2010 at 05:46 PM.
    “I am sorry negativity, I have no time for you. I have far too many positive things to do.”



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,835

    Default

    How do you treat the walls and beveling them?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2008
    Location
    The Great Northwest!
    Posts
    1,365

    Default

    Does a rider's rasp help? I have a regular rasp that I used to use, but the Rider's Rasp sounds so much easier!
    Foaling Around www.facebook.com/foalingaround
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LoveGirl83102 View Post
    Does a rider's rasp help? I have a regular rasp that I used to use, but the Rider's Rasp sounds so much easier!
    There's more to trimming a hoof than rasping the edges (regardless of which tool you use to do it with).



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,859

    Default

    The environment plays a huge difference. I first pulled shoes when I moved to Florida. There wasn't a rock for miles, just that sugar soft sand. Then we moved to Nevada. Nothing BUT rocks but the desert climate keeps their hooves dry and hard and it wasn't long before galloping over the lava rock was nothing. Gorgeous feet! Then it was back to Pennsylvania but I wasn't riding much so as a pasture horse barefoot was fine. Then onto Missouri... The combination of mud, constant moisture and huge rocks was just too much. I booted on rides but her feet were getting too worn town just walking around the pasture. It was time to put the shoes back on.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2005
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    5,219

    Default

    Post pics, please. I always enjoy discussions about hooves.



  12. #12

    Default

    A wetter climate = more grass, and thats a massive factor in hoof health. In the UK, where we live in the wet and then expect our horses to go over anything, including rocks, we need to monitor grass intake VERY carefully if we want rock-crunching hooves.

    Its possible, even if you live in a place that gets about 100 inches of rain a year, as I do, but its much more about the diet than the trim, and its not about rainfall on its own - my horses are just as sound when their hooves are wet (good thing really!).

    You can make a sound horse lame with a bad trim, but you can't trim a hoof to health if the horse is on an inappropriate diet.

    ETA:
    how to get flat feet to go concave?
    Leave well alone and change diet and environment - I posted some photos today of a horse that is here with me and which arrived 5 weeks ago with flat feet and very thin soles: http://rockleyfarm.blogspot.com/2010/03/thin-soles.html
    Last edited by nicbarker; Mar. 12, 2010 at 04:07 AM. Reason: Adding a link



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,468

    Default

    Better living through chemistry . . .

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