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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2007
    Location
    Pinehurst,NC
    Posts
    476

    Default Sitting Trot Help

    I can find written and video instruction on pretty much everything except SITTING TROT. Why is this?? I would be very appreciative for any technical instruction to help till I can put it all together. I watch upper level riders and long to sit that quietly and elegantly. Thanks in advance!
    "Success comes in cans, not in cannots!"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I'm no expert, but I do have one tidbit that helped me. I was told to visualize my pelvis in two parts - a left half and a right half. On each stride, one half will feel like it goes up while the other goes down, on the next stride its reversed. If your lower back is relaxed enough (think marshmallow butt), you can feel this up and down motion, and it will help you go with the horse a bit better. Good luck!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2007
    Location
    Pinehurst,NC
    Posts
    476

    Default

    Thanks mjmvet, I'll try it! I did get to see a youtube of an instructor with a student on an equisimulator. I would love to sit on one for a while so that I could just close my eyes and just concentrate on the feeling of it without haveing to watch where I am riding!
    "Success comes in cans, not in cannots!"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2008
    Posts
    5,467

    Default

    If you can ride in an arena without any obstacles in it, you can close your eyes and just ride forward. Hang onto the pommel if you like and let the horse go ... don't direct the horse ... use a slightly loose rein and hold onto the pommel. Just follow the horse.

    Also, there are many exercises for the sitting trot.

    Ride without stirrups is one.

    Another, take the reins in one hand and with your other hand grab the pommel of the saddle and really pull your pelvis down nto the deepest part of the saddle ... do not let your butt even think about bouncy anywhere. Your back needs to absorb all of the spring, bounce and suspension of the horse's spine ... your back must ripple with each stride.

    Another, grab the pommel with one hand and take your other hand and focus your eyes on something outside of the arena (like the top of a fence post) .... point the free hand at that object while you ride the outside rail of the ring .... turn your head to keep your eye on the object that you have chosen and keep your finger pointing at the object. Your back must absorb the rythym in order for you to keep your "target" in your "sights".
    Last edited by BaroquePony; Feb. 28, 2010 at 08:55 AM.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
    Posts
    38

    Default

    When you sit on a horse, think of the way the horse moves: up and down. ( although it swings side to side, it is still up and down) as a person your pelvis sits perpendicular to the horse, which is also going perpendicular to the ground. If you sit with a back that is too straight, your pelvis can't be flexible and follow the horse's movement. However, if you slightly rotate your pelvis forward ( tuck your rear under) you will be able to follw the movement without coming down hard and being jarred before being launched out of the saddle again to repeat the process! You will have to ask for a " slower" trot at first, ( aka not the huge trot we dressage people love to see!) but you HAVE to do it to get the feel! Another thing, don't be afraid to lean back a little more than usual. It will help your pelvis follow the movement! Many people will tell you " don't grip with the legs!" but that doesent work for everybody, so try some different leg gripps! Personally, I use more knees for trot and thighs for canter and transitions from canter. Hope this helps and that I wasn't confusing!
    In order not to be criticised:
    Do nothing.
    Say nothing.
    Be nothing.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2010
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    257

    Default

    I learned the sitting trot stirrup-less on the lunge line for a half hour at a time. I never ride dressage anymore, but 20m sitting trot circles are what I go back to when my body feels like it doesn't remember the least bit about riding a horse. For me, it feels very much like a thigh and pelvis thing. Thinking about my seat is actually counter-productive for me during the sitting trot, because my "seat" is just that thing I perch on the edge of during movies. One thing that helps me is to not think about clamping down or sitting "deep," but rather trying to find that sweet spot where I can sit tall but feel like the horse is almost hugging ME with its back when it trots, because the bunching and the stretching of its muscles are kind of sucking me on to the horse. I don't know if that makes sense to you, but that's what the physical sensation of the sitting trot is to me. Keep at it! When I was learning, grabbing the pommel and cantle with my hands and pulling myself deep into the saddle was helpful, I didn't like doing it too much because creating a different point of leverage made it feel totally different.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    1,451

    Default

    Sometimes you just need to hear it a different way to make it click. For example, my sister has a horrible time with "thumbs up" but tell her to put her "pinkies in" and she has great hands. I found when I was learning to sit trot that if I concentrated too much on my back it would tense up and get rigid ... the opposite of what you want. So I concentrate more on my abs/core and think of my abs as absorbing the motion - you get kind of a up/down ripple in your abs. Combine that with thinking of your seat bones sticking to the saddle and the alternating up/down movement of your hips someone else mentioned, and your back will supple and relax and actually be absorbing the shock. This method also lets me still have a driving seat because I'm not all stressed about my back being relaxed - it just is because I've engaged the opposite muscles.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    pretend you got a tube of toothpaste and you have to hold between your arse and the saddle - dont drop it
    also make sure you got your stirrups at correct lenght go to my helpful links pages fortips and info
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=178116



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2006
    Posts
    1,381

    Default

    Because of a woman's anatomy, most women have to deal with a pelvis that is slightly tipped forward. As the pelvis tips, the heavier upper portion creates even more tipping in the saddle. So in order to counter the effects of the normal pelvic position, you need to round your buttocks under you slightly. Then, the feeling needs to be: push down, come up; push down, come up....making each up portion exactly the same height. The height you come up, depends on your ability to adjust to the suspension of the horse . You must learn to do this with only the seat, and no grip to your legs against the horse. Where many people get into trouble is trying to ride a saddle that does not fit the horse correctly, or a saddle that has the stirrup leathers set too forward on the saddle's tree for their, particular conformation. If the rider must struggle to put her legs forward in order to get to the stirrups, there will be incorrect muscles tensed, and the sitting trot will become very labored as the rider's legs will not correctly hang from the hip sockets. You may eventually find it is easier for you to sit the trot without stirrups. If that becomes the case, look to your saddle for any problems you might have when you return your feet to the stirrups.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2008
    Posts
    408

    Default

    Great advice.. I learned in a bit different way...post 4, sit 4, post 4, sit 4 as you feel comfortable add more strides sitting.. Sometimes this helps just for warming up for the sitting trot. MHO



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2003
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Two things that really helped me:

    Turn your toes in, this helped me not pinch with my knee, back of my calf.

    Fold your belly at the belly button. when you're sitting correctly, your tum will bend at the area of the belly button every stride. If you're sitting with your pelvis too far back you can't fold the tum.
    glimmerling


    Member Appaloosa lovers clique



  12. #12

    Default

    step one: get some stiff boots, full seat breeches and guter sitz. :-)



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2008
    Posts
    179

    Default

    This is such a huge issue for so many people that I just posted an article on this on FB at:

    http://www.facebook.com/horse.training?ref=ts



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,038

    Default

    Jane, any advice specifically for those of us who ride Friesians? I swear I'm going to send you a video of him some time to use as an example. He's going nicely, but he's just darned bouncy!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2009
    Posts
    203

    Default sitting trot

    Close your eyes relax and think of England



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2002
    Location
    Cambray, ON
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    Wow these are all great tips! I've been dealing with the same issue, but to make things even worse, I have a saddle with CAIR panel... talk about adding to the bounce!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,038

    Default

    Yes, that will really help <sarcasm filter off>.

    The truth is, I don't have a problem sitting THE trot, I have a problem sitting HIS trot. I managed my big WB's lofty trot just fine, as long as he was properly under himself and working right. No problem, I just loosened my hips and went with the flow. A good number of longe lessons really helped. But this horse has me flummoxed, and my trainer just keeps telling me to be patient, that it'll come, and I know that she's right, because there are just moments when he's really warmed up and I can just feel that there is a trot in there that I can sit, if I were a bit more limber in the hip flexors. So I'm working on that aspect of it.



  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thatmoody View Post
    Jane, any advice specifically for those of us who ride Friesians? I swear I'm going to send you a video of him some time to use as an example. He's going nicely, but he's just darned bouncy!
    A hard to sit Friesian?? In my experience Friesians are up there with Andalusians as the easiest horses in the world to sit. (well, if we are talking about competitive dressage horses not backyard ponies and QHs that even a boyfriend can sit the trot on).



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2008
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Hi Thatmoody,
    Yes, Friesians can be challenging to sit to. They can sometimes appear connected because they "round" their necks but they're not always honestly "through". Their backs are still low and hips are high so they're in 2 parts.

    Follow the first tip and try to put his neck a little lower so it's in line with the power train of the hindquarters. When he's 100% connected, he should be easier to sit to even though his trot is big.

    Good luck!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2008
    Posts
    408

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony View Post
    A hard to sit Friesian?? In my experience Friesians are up there with Andalusians as the easiest horses in the world to sit. (well, if we are talking about competitive dressage horses not backyard ponies and QHs that even a boyfriend can sit the trot on).
    Care to share your experience Thanks Jane...as always you are right on target and who would know better than the one who rides the Gorgeous Moshi!!



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