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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default someone please knock some sense in me!

    There is a small horse property for sale nearby. Crunching numbers, I can technically make the mortgage happen with some money left over. But fact is, it's way cheaper to continue with current living situation and boarding my horse. I have no DH to help with property maintenance, and I'm not terribly handy. But I can't get rid of the mental picture of my horse and a buddy happily grazing in my back yard!

    Please COTHers, give me all the reasons this is a terrible idea!! Horror stories, tales of rising hay prices, whatever. Let me have it!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Posts
    2,445

    Default

    If your current situation is cheaper, stick with it! Just think of all the perks of boarding.....if your sick you don't have to go clean/muck/TO, there is somebody keeping an eye on your horse, you don't have to worry about arranging feed deliveries. Plus if your not that handy it will cost an arm and a leg to keep up a horse place because you know they will destroy everything in site and whoever you hire won't do it right.

    Did that help at all?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    You already stated the reasons in your own post - cost and time. Trust me, you will ride less if the horses are home as you will be bogged down with the daily upkeep - no matter how time efficient you become. Ask me how I know. And then what to do if you are squeeking by financially, and a big honking vet bill comes along? Or you need a new truck or trailer? And you will need farm equipment (even if only a riding lawn mower). And don't forget the utilities and insurance bills. . .

    Sorry, usually I am a horrible enabler for the "keep your horses at home" crowd, but I would not do it if I didn't have a support system at home. My DH is not horsey, so all the farm chores are mine and mine alone (well, unless it involves power tools - then he will gladly lend a hand). But he picks up the slack by taking care of the house and the yard (although somehow I got the pool maintenance duties too!).

    And numbers aside, there are other factors, such as the loss of barn buddies to chat and hang with (flip side - no barn drama), difficulty locating feed, vets, farriers, etc. (unless you are in a real horse-friendly area like I am). Difficulties with neighbors could arise if they are not into horses and all that comes with them. And the loss of a support system, those horse friends that are there for you if your horse is sick or lame, or you want to go away for an overnight trip and have no one to look after them. And you can forget about sleeping in ever again.

    That is all that comes to mind right now.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
    Posts
    7,023

    Default

    DONT DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,949

    Default

    as much as we like to enable, in this case it's a don't.

    If you are not handy, you have to call somebody = big bucks

    You are talking horse +1 = more money

    You are alone, so you have to do the work = less time

    So you are better off as is, safe what you can, a better property will be there yet...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Don't get house poor. Believe me Esp. with horses. Because you may have a little left after paying the bills but when your horse get sick or hurt or when you need to buy your own feed and hay and shavings and the farriers due, just having a little left over won't cut it. Also, if you get a farm remember you can't just up and leave when you please. no vacation, no dinners after work because you have to get home and take care of horses or you can't find someone responsible enough to do it for you. Then when your horse knocks over the fence and you need a winch and 4 wheeler to pull it up with and tighten it back and help holding it at the last min. because if you don't get it up then the horse gets out, well lets just say its a pain!! Unless you really really love it I wouldn't for one or two horses I'd keep boarding. Hope that helps.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
    Location
    AreaII
    Posts
    1,348

    Default

    Another vote for NO WAY!!!!! If you are comfortable now- keep it that way! Believe us- before long you're going to regret having to do 800% more work at 8000% more expense to see your horse (and his new expensive friend) poop in your yard!

    The grass is never greener on the other side of the fence- only fertilized!

    There is a lot that goes on behind the scenes that is just not worth it IMHO. If only I could go back.... LOL!



  8. #8

    Default

    My Valentine's Day...

    3 feet of snow.
    Husband plows around barn, hits water line, shears it.
    I haul water for 5 horses from house to barn.
    Husband and I spend 4 hours in an 8 foot hole of mud, ice, and snow fixing water line.

    Don't do it!!
    Cornerstone Equestrian
    Home of Amazing (Balou du Rouet/Voltaire)
    KWPN, ISR/Old NA, RPSI, and IHF stallion
    www.cornerstonefarmpa.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,415

    Default

    You'll never ride again.

    How's that for a disincentive?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2003
    Location
    Up the creek from bar.ka
    Posts
    10,029

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mroades View Post
    DONT DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    omg you took the words right out of my mind.

    DO.NOT.DO.IT!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,216

    Default

    Don't do it. too much work, money, hassle, maintenance. No way.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,647

    Default

    I've done both.

    Granted I was married when I owned my farmette...but he was not a "country" boy and even getting him to mow the yard around the house was not worth the resultant grumbling beforehand and bitching afterward. I also boarded five horses on my place in addition to my three.

    Pros
    I did what I wanted, including when and how
    I could see the horses almost all the time, except when I was working
    I like to mow paddocks, drag arenas, scrub troughs and muck stalls
    No commute to see the horses, just a short walk
    There are more, I'm just multi-tasking with the dog right now...

    Cons
    When you're sick and you have to go out anyways, it sucks. I've literally taken a horse out, stopped and vomited on the way to the barn, taken a horse out, stopped and....yeah. Or that bronchitis I got in the middle of the winter? Yeah.
    When something goes wrong, it's a DISASTER. Pipes burst in the middle of the night or while you're at work, flood the barn, shoot water onto the electric fence charger, etc. HOURS of labor, horses and people inconvenienced because stalls have to dry, wasted bedding, cost of replacing everything that broke (double-suck if it broke under ground...).
    Even if you're handy (I wasn't really that handy), on a farm, most of the stuff that breaks needs two sets of hands in my experience.
    Cost of hay, feed, bedding is NOT going down
    It never fails that when you leave, even with a barn sitter, someone hurts themselves or colics or gets loose or the above-mentioned pipe bursts...
    Two words: manure management
    There are more, I'm just multi-tasking with the dog right now; he's a PITA.


    I did not add in the grief boarders add to the cons list. And I know there have to be more, such as my county has regulations on farmland "best practice" stuff. Not to mention dealing with weeds, rotating paddocks, dealing with mud (and do I ever hate MUD!).

    Personally, I think the pros have a greater value than the cons, like maybe 1.5 to every -1, but still...unless you're saving money, I say wait. I'm boarding right now, and own a house in town. I might get my own horse place again, but not anytime soon.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2006
    Location
    Gotham City
    Posts
    1,163

    Default

    Unless you plan on waking up every morning at 5 AM and padding out to the barn to feed and muck, EVERY SINGLE DAY, even if there is a blizzard and you have the swine flu and your best friend's wedding starts at noon and your horse hopped the fence last night anyway — DO NOT DO IT. I grew up on a farm and to this day I remain jealous of anyone who had/has the wonderful luxury of boarding.

    Besides, if your horse could talk, he'd probably tell you likes being around all those other horses.
    "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,141

    Default

    Boarding Rocks.

    I almost had a horse property in December, and thankfully things didn't work out for me. A few years back I leased a 5 stall/15acre farm and after 3 years I was so burnt out I wanted to sell my horses, move to a high rise condo, and never see anything with fur or hair again.

    It's a ton of work...



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2001
    Posts
    8,542

    Default

    I've literally taken a horse out, stopped and vomited on the way to the barn, taken a horse out, stopped and....yeah
    Yup. Me too. when I have a migraine horses still have to be fed and go out. barf. Chores have to be done. barf.


    Consider there are many more costs than the mortgage-

    taxes, insurance, maintainence, fences, utility bills for house and barn, supplies , hay,grain,bedding, ring construction if you need to do that

    then the extra work- lawn mowing, stacking hay, regular chores,stalls etc, , snow shovelling if applicable and so on. Factor that all in.

    if you have no assistance you are completely tied to the farm every day. There is never a day off or a day to sleep in.

    Too often people just compare the mortgage payment to the rent/board payment and forget all the other costs and the work and time involved in being a property owner.

    Still, I won't go back to boarding unless I absloutely have to but I'm crazy like that.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,193

    Default

    Trust me, it's going to cost way more than your numbers indicate. I did the number crunching, and I came out with some extra money. Had I not met my hubby after I moved, I would probably have had the house taken by the bank by now. It's just so much more expensive. Utilities are more, insurance is more, you will probably have to go to DirecTV and an air card for internet, which is more expensive. Plus your horses will find a way to hurt themselves on the existing fencing, your hotwire will never work, and you will have to rip up and replace the existing fencing. You will never have time to ride again.

    For me, I couldn't go back to boarding because I cannot drive, and even riding in the car makes me sick. But for normal people, stick with boarding.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    If I only owned one horse I'd board it. Heck, if I only owned TWO horses I'd board them. Me and LMEqT would have a great time together, boarding at the nice place she takes lessons at. Don't do it!

    My answer is surely tempered by the fact that there is gobs of snow coming down here and I will have to go out in it and feed the horses in about an hour or so I hate cold and snow!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,734

    Default

    Don't do it!

    Hell, I won't even buy a CONDO because when I did the math, renting is far, FAR cheaper, and I have a living situation that could be described as "priceless". Although I have a very unusual situation that makes it make sense. I ran my most "pro-buy" friend through the numbers and their jaw just dropped
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Phew, you guys are life savers!! I'm feeling much more grounded in reality now I was half afraid all the enablers would come out of the woodwork

    There are a couple pluses (just so you know I'm not TOTALLY nutters to dream...). My neighbor would be a riding facility with an indoor. My roommate would bring her horse and help with feedings. Horsey minded family lives nearby.

    But wow...those stories about pipes bursting And all the $$$ that would go to maintenance and mortgage instead of horse shows.

    I'll file this in the "maybe when I'm married and have 100k in the bank" folder.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,216

    Default

    You aren't crazy to dream. But it's like those lifestyle magazines. No one really has that porch that is perfectly perfect with the perfect clean dog sitting on the top step and the clean fluffy pillows on the white wicker swing and a pitcher of sweet tea on a platter with some fresh cookies and green grass in the yard and birds tweeting in the trees.


    In reality it's time to pressure wash that dingy looking swing and those pillows are nappy and the dog rolled in some sort of stink. There's a pile of muddy shoes by the door. and a beer bottle cap under the rubber doormat gathering dog hair and cat kibble.

    Or is it just me???



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