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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2006
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    Great Falls VA
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    60

    Default shutting down the big buck!

    Does anybody have any tips or tools for shutting down a bucking spree? I can sit the spin and bolt, but the bucks are getting me unseated. Any suggestions?



  2. #2
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Port Orange, FL
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    Default

    Forward, Head up !

    The faster a horse goes, the less he can buck (if you watch the rodeo you can see that the broncs are not bucking when they go more forward)
    The other thing is to try to not let them use their neck down and out. If you feel that your horse wants to buck you need to pop him up and keep his head as high as you can. Then relax your hands again to let him use his topline properly.

    I broke a boat load of young horses, rode my share of problem horses and naughty stallions and those two principles saved my butt many, many times



  3. #3
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mademoiselle View Post
    Forward, Head up !
    Agree, totally. Some of the best advice I ever got was "when in doubt, go forward"



  4. #4
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Default

    I agree - Head up and PUSH forward RAPIDLY ~ he can slow down when and only when he does not wish to buck ~ wear him out with galloping until he calms down ~ he will stop the "clowning" they tire more quickly than one realizes when in the bucking mode ~ takes alot of effort to buck. IMHO
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  5. #5
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    Sep. 6, 2006
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    Great Falls VA
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    Default

    Thanks for the swift replies...it feels like my mare can power forward and buck at the same time -- she's very talented!! I will definitely try the head up move if I can move quickly enough next time, although I really hope we're not going to go there again -- I'm getting too old to bounce.



  6. #6
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    When she bucks ~ if you can not keep her head up and run her forward or if you can not afford to get hurt or choose not to take the risk as it is not really part of your plan ~ then get off and lunge her still tacked up ~ till she is exhausted and then get on and walk her out - ~ they learn quickly after one of the DON"T STOP sessions. Then you both will be rewarded by a nice cool out with you on board. Worked for my last bucking mare ~ only took one session. Good Luck ! IMHO IMHO IMHO Don't flame me ~ IMHO !
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  7. #7
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Port Orange, FL
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    Default

    If she is still able to throw big bucks, you are not going fast enough
    Trust me, no horse on earth can galop (think Cross country speed) and buck. Mechanically it's not possible.

    I had a couple of student that had naughty horses and what they thought was forward, was not even close to be forward. Make her run her 'sorry' ass off (think Kentucky Derby in the last strech), then when she is in a better mood, time to go back to a more appropriate pace.

    I rode a very, very naughty 3 YO stallion 2 years ago for a BNT. That little bugger couldn't keep 4 feet on the ground for more than 10 strides in a row. After running around the ring over and over, he got the concept that bucking was way too much work and not that fun.
    The other thing, is you can try to longe her (not to get her tired), but just to establish forward. When you cluck she should carry on. So, when you get on you know that she is not full of herself, and that she has no excuse.

    Last, make sure that she is not uncomfortable.
    My 5 YO welsh stallion has bucking fits, when he thinks we have done too much canter work. When he does that, I go in 2 point and work on forward again.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2003
    Location
    northern California
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    Default

    Once the horse has started to buck getting her to go forward is your best bet, but instead of trying to shut down an already started buck, how about preventing her to buck to begin with? Does she have certain triggers for the bucking or does she do it totally unpredictably? You should be able to feel her prepare for the buck! Keep her busy and when you start feeling her slow down and hunch, immediately ride her forward and keep her distracted. I don't know where she is in her training, but transitions work well at all levels to get a horse back on the aids. As soon as you feel her focus and relax, tell her good girl. Hopefully you can channel her energy that way. If she does buck, it is a disobedience (and a bad one), so she must be corrected. Ride with a wip and when she starts bucking immediately smack her to get her to go forward and then galopp until she wants to stop. When she starts slowing down go around one more time (you're the boss, you say when to go and when to stop)! Good luck!
    Hoppe, Hoppe, Reiter...
    Wenn er faellt dann schreit er...

    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post
    forward is like love - you can never have enough



  9. #9
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    Jun. 7, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mademoiselle View Post
    If she is still able to throw big bucks, you are not going fast enough
    Trust me, no horse on earth can galop (think Cross country speed) and buck. Mechanically it's not possible.

    I had a couple of student that had naughty horses and what they thought was forward, was not even close to be forward. Make her run her 'sorry' ass off (think Kentucky Derby in the last strech), then when she is in a better mood, time to go back to a more appropriate pace.

    I rode a very, very naughty 3 YO stallion 2 years ago for a BNT. That little bugger couldn't keep 4 feet on the ground for more than 10 strides in a row. After running around the ring over and over, he got the concept that bucking was way too much work and not that fun.
    The other thing, is you can try to longe her (not to get her tired), but just to establish forward. When you cluck she should carry on. So, when you get on you know that she is not full of herself, and that she has no excuse.

    Last, make sure that she is not uncomfortable.
    My 5 YO welsh stallion has bucking fits, when he thinks we have done too much canter work. When he does that, I go in 2 point and work on forward again.
    This is, of course, assuming the arena is 400x600, yes?

    Because I am a little unsure of how one applies this advice around the average short side (with or without perimeter fence) at a "true" gallop.
    Staying in the ring optional?



  10. #10
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Port Orange, FL
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    Default

    Obviously you need to adapt to the place where you are riding.

    I have cured bucking in a round pen (many would be surprised on how foward a horse can go in a round pen).

    When I was still training, my indoor was 65x130 and I could still carry enough speed to not be launched of my OTTB after 3 months of stall rest.

    But, if there is an other cure than forward and head up for bucking, I'm wiiling to try it. I have 2 very atheltic and palyful stallions to ride



  11. #11
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    Default

    and the cross country speed was an image, because what many dressage people think is forward, would not be perceived as forward by riders of other disciplines



  12. #12
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    Feb. 11, 2002
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    Yes, get the head up and go forward, however sometimes getting that head up is easier said than done (they can really lock it down), and the forward que just makes them buck more!

    I find that when their head is already down and braced against your hands into a buck, it's easier to crank it around to one side--just pull on one rein either to the right or the left to unlock the neck, THEN get the head up and send them forward.



  13. #13
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    Mar. 18, 2007
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    Default

    Borrow a western saddle until the weather warms up and horsey is more cooperative. Much easier to keep your seat and not be tossed forward or back.



  14. #14
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    Mar. 4, 2009
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    Arizona
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    As soon as you feel the buck coming, get that head up and go, go, go! She needs to be able to plant her front to get her back end up in the air, and she can't do that when moving forward rapidly. Also, the way they balance themselves for a big buck is head diving down, and she can't do that if you're riding forward while pulling her head up.

    Also, for YOU, sit back! Don't get pulled forward, or hunch forward. You have to sit back, head and eyes up, relax your body so you can ride through the motion (easier said than don, I know) and get that pony going. This is one case when I don't care if you're riding forward, hands pulling those reins up in the air, kicking and yelling, "get up!" to your horse in a comlpetely non-graceful, non-beautiful way.

    I'm guessing that your mare has this in her head as a super-effective evasion that has worked in the past, so she's going to try to squeeze a few bucks in there even if you ride her forward, so you have to feel it coming ad make a big deal out of the fact that you're going to ride her s$$ right out of it, and she's going to work that naughty butt of hers twice as hard after.

    You see, I own a mare who was notorious for unseating anybody who got on her and was headed to auction for it, purebred, papered, gorgeous horse that she is, she was unwanted. I got her for basically nothing, just for taking her off their hands - lucky me! …eventually… She did get me off once, and I got after her FROM THE GROUND for it. I wanted her convinced that bucking = no fun for pony. She was shocked. I rode every attempt thoroughly through after that, whooping and hollering as I had my hands in the air kicking away. Very ungraceful. Somewhat embarrasing to do in public, but it only took a couple of days, no joke, and this horse who was feared and unwanted, was now my wonderful mare to enjoy. She has yet to try it again in eight years of ownership, that's how much of an affect my rediculous-seeming anti-buck actions had.

    ETA - of course all this is considering it's just a "naughty" thing and she's not bucking out of pain from poor saddle fit or other issues, so naturally you'll want to be sure of that first.
    Last edited by esdressage; Feb. 26, 2010 at 11:33 AM.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 30, 2010
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    Alberta
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    Default

    Why is she bucking? It sounds like this is a chronic issue, and not just a "playing while learning lead changes" thing, so I would look at fixing the issue that is causing the buck so that you don't have to worry about riding one out in the first place.

    Bucking usually stems from tension, which can come from frustration or soreness. Sometimes the horse just doesn't know what else to do to get its point across to its rider. "Correcting" the buck without finding the cause may just force the horse to communicate its frustrations in a different way (such as bolting or becoming nappy)!

    Karen



  16. #16
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    Nov. 26, 2006
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    398

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WBLover View Post
    Yes, get the head up and go forward, however sometimes getting that head up is easier said than done (they can really lock it down), and the forward que just makes them buck more!

    I find that when their head is already down and braced against your hands into a buck, it's easier to crank it around to one side--just pull on one rein either to the right or the left to unlock the neck, THEN get the head up and send them forward.
    Yep, I agree with this- also helps stop a bolt. Put them onto a tiny circle and they have to stop bucking because of balance. Sometimes trying to send a horse forward is impossible- I got on one horse after he had bucked his rider off, and he tried it with me, so I gave him a good smack on the butt with the whip and he gave an even bigger buck that almost unloaded me, and I'm generally pretty sticky. If you have a horse really set on doing something, usually a circle can interrupt them - for a "spree" it sounds like he needs something to interrupt his brain.



  17. #17
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    Jul. 10, 2008
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    1,068

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    In addition to the advice of going forward when it happens - the biggest well kept secret about bucking is to stand in your stirrups (but don't lean forward) when your horse bucks. If your seat is out of the saddle you won't get tossed around with each buck. Shorten your stirrups a hole or two if you have to for a bit to make it easier - you want your response to stand to become automatic. Before you know it you will hardly notice the bucking. It isn't obvious to others what you are doing other than you looking completely calm and unconcerned while riding through bucks. At your next show outing watch some of the pros that are warming up the exuberant horses.



  18. #18
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    Sep. 12, 2007
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    503

    Default

    Donkey's post is particularly effective is you have ridden h/j and if you are in a h/j saddle. It's harder to get out of the dressage saddle without risking some tender parts.

    "Going forward" does not necessarily mean canter. It's easy for the horse to buck in canter. It's hard to get a true gallop going in a small arena. I have found that putting the horse into the biggest strongest long trot you can muster is equally effective. Make that horse MOVE. Get him securely on the aids. If he lifts his head to go to canter, move him bigger, if he lowers his head to buck, bring it up, and send him on. It is even harder to buck from a trot than a gallop, but it only takes an athletic horse one step to go from trot to canter to bronc.

    Trot the horse until he shows signs he doesn't want to go anymore. Then canter. You have to be fit and to keep breathing to ride it out. If you're not fit enough, keep the longe line and whip on the rail ready if you run out of steam before the horse does.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Near Chi-Town
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    Default

    As others have stated it is critical to figure out why your horse is bucking as it can be dealt with multiple ways. If your horse is bucking because it is playful, then by all means work on riding the buck out by pushing them forward. I find the canter is too easy for them to get overly downhill (as it is my weakest gait) and free up their back ends to buck. My personal experience has been if I power trot a horse around the ring, change directions a lot, and work on basic lateral work, I loosen up the back and get the horse listening and in front of my leg. A horse that is truly in front of your leg and working up into the bridle will find it extremely difficult to buck.

    The issue with just running the horse around the ring is that if the horse is not in front of or listening to the leg, the buck can still happen at almost any speed (ask me how I know, I got flung over a 5 foot outdoor railing by a horse that was galloping around the ring bucking). My guess is that is why your horse can still buck at high speeds, it is behind your leg and moving downhill, thereby freeing up the back end to buck. Try to keep pushing your horse up and into the bridle at whatever speed you can best maintain it at.

    However, if there is a soundness issue there, as there often is, please check to make sure the saddle fits, and find a good chiro/masseuse/saddle fitter if necessary.

    ETA: Narcisco you posted while I was writing mine, but I totally agree!



  20. #20
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    Mar. 1, 2009
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    East Coast
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    OMG, I have been dealing with bucking and spooking issues since Nov! I have only ridden my horse western, with a tie down on, working on him not dropping his shoulder on me, beause that is where all hell breaks loose. We are improving every time I ride! thank god for that!



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