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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,193

    Default How to level the hitch when using a weight-distributing hitch?

    I have an older weight-distributing hitch for my 2h BP trailer. The truck is an older Suburban and it's not jacked up at all. But the trailer is still fairly high in the front, which I guess is better than being low in the front, but I still would like to have it more level.

    How do I do that? With a normal hitch, I would just go buy one with a bit more drop, but that's not an option with the weight-distributing hitch.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Posts
    739

    Default

    Buying a new WDH shank with more drop should be an option, just the same as a regular ballmount can be had with more/less height.

    What kind of WDH is it? Are you saying it is one of the older one piece welded deals?
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampton Bay View Post
    I have an older weight-distributing hitch for my 2h BP trailer. The truck is an older Suburban and it's not jacked up at all. But the trailer is still fairly high in the front, which I guess is better than being low in the front, but I still would like to have it more level.

    How do I do that? With a normal hitch, I would just go buy one with a bit more drop, but that's not an option with the weight-distributing hitch.
    Most of the weight distributing hitches I've seen are adjustable like this one:
    http://www.hitchingup.com/images/wei...stribution.gif

    There's a bolt on the vehicle side of the ball that will adjust the height up or down if removed. You can see the T-shaped bar that slides into the receiver a little better in the right on this photo. It's laying in its side, it would be rotated 90 degrees in use. Those holes are for the vertical adjustment.

    http://assets.iqestores.com/product_...hres/66540.jpg



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,157

    Default

    Before purchasing anything new, I would hitch the trailer up, load all the stuff you plan to carry, horse, see if trailer front levels out.

    I purposely had them set the ball higher than level with the empty trailer hitched. Two inches up I think, with heavy truck spring package. By the time I put in 1-2 horses, some hay and tack in the truck rear or in tack area under manger, the hitch had leveled out. Truck and trailer made a smooth, level line from front to back end.

    The sway bars were hitched with two links hanging, to move weight towards the front of truck. I had a small length of pipe to lift the chain end brackets for bars on trailer tongue, so not much lift effort was needed. Just that you could feel the tension as you locked the bracket down.

    Sway bars move the loaded weight forward to the front end of truck, hence the name "weight distribution hitch" so load is easier to control in driving, and STOPPING the total load. The bars make a HUGE difference in how the trailer hauls when the semi trucks pass and hit you with the air they are pushing. I would not haul a bumper pull without the bars, used them EVERY time we hitched the trailer up.

    With 4 horses in the trailer, I used 3 links hanging, bars put the more weight from the tongue, forward of the hitch, to spread around onto truck chassis. Tension needed will depend on how long your sway bars are, longer bars bend easier than short ones, so they "feel" easier to hook up. Bars should have some tension when lifting drop down, swing arms to hook up on brackets, whether bars are short or long in length. Sometimes asking at the hitch place will give you the best answer, that is where I learned how to decide links needed for weight in trailer.

    Either chain link used when I hitched the bars, the trailer and truck rode level when trailer was loaded with horses.

    You should be happy with the higher ball hitch, it will keep you from bottoming out on those driveway drops into the road!! That is ugly and hard on the equipment.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,193

    Default

    This is an old welded WDH, not adjustable in and of itself.

    I have also hauled with it set up the way it is, so I know it doesn't level out when loaded.

    If I cannot fix it, is it really bad for it to be not-quite-level? I will keep the tires on the trailer rotated so they don't wear too unevenly.



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