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  1. #1
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    Default Organic Fertilizer

    Anyone know anything about organic fertilizer? What kind to get? Liquid? Solid? When to apply? My hay field runs off into a creek, and I don't want to be a polluter.



  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    Anyone know anything about organic fertilizer? What kind to get? Liquid? Solid? When to apply? My hay field runs off into a creek, and I don't want to be a polluter.

    It does not matter what kind of fertilizer you use, what matters is the dose and the type, short release vs time release.

    If your spoil test shows an immediate need for nutrients you get a quick release,

    Otherwise you go with something that binds the nutrients for a longer time thus minimizing the chance for run off.

    The 'organic' vs' un organic' is a bit of a load of crock IMHO.

    What things like composted manure do, they activate the organisms in the soil and can help build up the top soil, what mineralic fertilizers can't do, but when it boils down to basics, the chemical compounds that the plants can access are the same.

    So you can be better off with a time release fertilizer, like Osmocote (it's a popular gardening product) than with a truck load of cow manure - which in it's nature is - mixed with the pee - liquid, and organic, and easily washed out into the streams.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  3. #3
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    There are many sources of an organic fertilizer. Check out your local ag extension service and see if there are any organic distributors in your area. Perdue Agri-recycling sells a pelleted poultry manure that is certified organic and works very well.


    Any fertilizer that isn't incorporated into the soil has the potential to run off, whether it's manure or Osmocote. A good way to keep it out of the water is to maintain a grass/tree buffer of at least 35' on slopes less than 5% and even wider on steeper slopes.



  4. #4
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    It is very confusing. I do not have to have "certified" organic.

    I think what I am looking for is some kind of fish emulsion and seaweed product. It is a 4-3-3. So far, AGGrand is the winner.

    One guy is selling a "bio soil enhancer" that looks just like a 15-5-5 chemical fertilizer with some bacteria in it.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    It is very confusing. I do not have to have "certified" organic.

    I think what I am looking for is some kind of fish emulsion and seaweed product. It is a 4-3-3. So far, AGGrand is the winner.

    One guy is selling a "bio soil enhancer" that looks just like a 15-5-5 chemical fertilizer with some bacteria in it.
    The 15-5-5 is the percentage of the nutrients in the fertilizer, with no regard to the chemical compount: Nitrogen-phosphor-potash(Kalium) NPK for short.

    That means the nitrogen content is 15%, vs 4 in the other thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    It is very confusing. I do not have to have "certified" organic.

    I think what I am looking for is some kind of fish emulsion and seaweed product. It is a 4-3-3. So far, AGGrand is the winner.

    One guy is selling a "bio soil enhancer" that looks just like a 15-5-5 chemical fertilizer with some bacteria in it.
    ummmm

    run away


    really

    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  7. #7
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    One of the best ways to mitigate your environmental impact is to perform a soil test.

    Your extension agent (and perhaps feed store) can advise you on how to collect the soil samples and where to send them.

    Once you have your test results, you'll know exactly what your soil needs.

    Then you can apply the proper amount of fertilizer and/or lime, and can time the application to minimize the possibility of runoff.

    Your extension agent and/or soil and water conservation district can also give you free advice on how to manage your land.

    Hope that helps.


    eta - I agree with Tamara - run away from that product - you'll be better off if you work with the extension agent.



  8. #8
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    I am not confused about fertilizer in general. We do use a nitrogen rich combination here in Central Texas. What I am confused about is the different kinds of "organic" fertilizer. Run from which one? The fish emulsion one? It sounds like a good alternative to straight chemicals to me. But really I wonder, what is so wrong with the chemical ones, if anything?



  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    Run from which one? The fish emulsion one? It sounds like a good alternative to straight chemicals to me. But really I wonder, what is so wrong with the chemical ones, if anything?
    neither of the one you mentioned is cost effective...this is not a value judgment but a result from our testing as a farm that needs to make money every year to survive

    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  10. #10
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    Well cost effective is a consideration, but I am trying to be environmentally responsible. Does anyone know if chemical fertilizer is "bad" when it is likely to run off into a creek?



  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    Well cost effective is a consideration, but I am trying to be environmentally responsible. Does anyone know if chemical fertilizer is "bad" when it is likely to run off into a creek?
    if you have misapplied something to your field, such that it runs into a creek, it's probably "bad" no matter what it is

    the "bad into a creek" scenario applies mostly unbalancing whatever is there right now...

    it's not about chemicals really,as if it's in the creek it ain't on your field where you paid for it to be

    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  12. #12
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    A product like the AGGrand one you mentioned that is 4-3-3 means there's only 4% N, 3% P, and 3%K. So to get 40lbs/acre of N (which is a pretty reasonable application for a hay field), you'd need to apply like 1000lbs of that product per acre. It might be "organic" but it's not cost effect as Tamara said.

    Plus... it doesn't matter where the source of the N,P, and K is coming from - it matters whether you've applied a correct amount in a correct manner and your crop is USING all of the N,P,and K. Otherwise it leaches or runs off and you pollute said creek.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    Does anyone know if chemical fertilizer is "bad" when it is likely to run off into a creek?
    Yes. You'll polluting the creek with excess nutrients that can lead to algae blooms, fish kills, etc.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  14. #14
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    Well it seems like "organic" fertilizer is not necessary, so long as my timing is right. I am thinking ideal would be before a light rain, but not before a hard one. I guess I can do the land the most good by avoiding herbicides, and not worry so much about "chemicals" in fertilizer.



  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    I guess I can do the land the most good by avoiding herbicides, and not worry so much about "chemicals" in fertilizer.
    you do the best for the land by avoiding the wrong thing, at the wrong time, in the wrong amount and it will not matter what the "thing" is

    if I dump 10,000 pounds of horse manure on a hill and it rains 4 inches in two days that leaches and hits the lands downhill from the pile...and there is no "chemical" about manure

    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  16. #16
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    Oh my gosh you can call this guy named Scott from central Texas who keeps calling and emailing me about buying organic fertilizer! I do not cut hay or do a lot of fertilizing on my pastures (not enough to warrant "special" fertilizer) and yet he calls and adds me to his email lists. He ripped my info off of a horse for sale ad and pretended to be calling about horses at first (like a year ago). Today he left a voice mail and said he is calling about the hay. What hay? There is no hay!



  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindsay_aggie View Post
    Oh my gosh you can call this guy named Scott from central Texas who keeps calling and emailing me about buying organic fertilizer! I do not cut hay or do a lot of fertilizing on my pastures (not enough to warrant "special" fertilizer) and yet he calls and adds me to his email lists. He ripped my info off of a horse for sale ad and pretended to be calling about horses at first (like a year ago). Today he left a voice mail and said he is calling about the hay. What hay? There is no hay!
    yep the diatomacious earth peddlers are the next most dishonest

    they like to call us and say "we got your name off the info request sheet you filled out at the Farm Show"

    nice try dillweed...we don't go to farm shows...we are to busy <wait for it> farrrr-mmm-innngg..blow off loser boy

    click

    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipHiLad4me View Post
    Yes. You'll polluting the creek with excess nutrients that can lead to algae blooms, fish kills, etc.
    But so is taking big leaks into the creek and that is all organic!

    Years back they found out that - at least in Europe - most of the bad stuff in the rivers and lakes was not from the evul farmers, but from house gardens...you know, the nice lush green (over fertilized) lawns etc...laundry detergents etc...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    Years back they found out that - at least in Europe - most of the bad stuff in the rivers and lakes was not from the evul farmers, but from house gardens...you know, the nice lush green (over fertilized) lawns etc...laundry detergents etc...

    That's true for the most part in the US too but that doesn't mean it's ok for farm owners to go all willy-nilly with their fertilizing
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipHiLad4me View Post
    That's true for the most part in the US too but that doesn't mean it's ok for farm owners to go all willy-nilly with their fertilizing

    it's not money wise to do so, the over fertilizing, that is.

    It's just unfair finger pointing... the evul farmers are the bane of existence...heck, a golf course blows a lot more fertilizer out into the great wide open...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



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