The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 35
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2006
    Posts
    1,030

    Default Switching to Ultium?

    I currently feed a horse Safe Choice. However, I have to supplement the heck out of it to get him close to looking and feeling right and I don't feel like he has enough "working energy;" that is, the energy needed to produce consistent high quality work.

    He is also not shiny and has a poor quality coat. He is of course groomed consistently and on a good worming program.

    The horse is a 7 year old TB young jumper. He gets worked 5-6 days per week for about an hour (of course the weather has disturbed that schedule a bit...).

    He normally gets turned out usually all day or all night in a small chat paddock, but the weather has greatly limited that lately.

    He gets 3 big flakes of good quality hay three times a day.

    I have been feeding 1.5 scoops of Safe Choice + 2 cups of rice bran twice a day.

    He also gets MSM, Magnesium, Probios, U-Guard, and a Vit/Min supplement.

    I am looking at Ultium and am looking at both the cost difference as well as supplementation difference. My feeling is that I can cut out a lot of the supplements, feed less and have a better horse. I get 6 bags of SC per month.

    The price is pretty different, but I am thinking cutting some of the supplements and feeding less will make up the difference?

    How much Ultium would you feed the above horse? The Purina website says 7.25 pounds per day; I can't wrap my mind around how many scoops that is.

    Any recommendations/advice particularly addressing Ultium?

    TIA!
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. (Aristotle)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2004
    Location
    Back in the 'nati
    Posts
    3,360

    Default

    FWIW, I've always found Purina's feeding recommendations to be a little more grain than I am comfortable with.

    I switched my 18 yo TB gelding to Ultium last fall. He'd spent most of his life on Omolene 200, and was still doing well on it but I have another horse with Cushing's, and while I was thinking about her dietary requirements realized that he really didn't need all those NSCs, especially now that he's getting older. I fed him about 2 pounds of Omolene twice a day, maybe a little less, and he's currently getting about 1.5 pounds of Ultium twice daily (that's a little over half of one of those "standard" square grain scoops). He also gets 5-6 flakes (don't know weight) of a very nice alfalfa/grass mix hay daily. He hasn't been in really consistent work for the past couple of weeks, but prior to that was holding his weight really well. I haven't noticed a significant change in his energy level, either.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    12,077

    Wink

    I always feed less than Purina suggests.

    However, for accuracy you may have to give up your scoops, since scoops come in all sizes, and a scoop of one feed may weigh less than another. Ideally both grain and hay should be fed by weight. Fisherman's de-liar scales work pretty well, and an old fashioned kitchen scale works well for grain.

    And yes, you can dispense with the supplements if feeding Ultium, and know that your supplements (in the feed) have been plotted by experts.

    A 1500lb 4th level WB at this barn gets 5lb/day in split feedings, and free choice grass hay, and is shiny fit and in great weight.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2009
    Posts
    686

    Default

    Personally, when we were feeding ultium, my gelding who was in moderate work (ridden 6 days a week w/ about 30-40 mins of trotting) he only got 1 cup (a measuring up like you use in the kitchen) AM and PM. But he was on extremely rich grass. Yet other horses on the farm who were in the same work were getting alot more.

    I think your best bet would be to get one of those scoops that has the weight on it. They are very accurate and then just play with it a little. I know you said you are feeding 1 1/2 scoops now but how big are your scoops?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2008
    Posts
    1,409

    Default

    I was feeding my 17.1+h six-year-old TB mare 2lbs 10oz (the weight of one scoop) of Ultium three times a day so I guess that comes to nearly 8 pounds a day. She was in work about six days a week for 45 to 60 minutes each ride and turned out 24/7 with free access to a decent quality grass hay. She's a fairly hard keeper and I've been trying to put weight on her, and I've been very pleased with Ultium for that.

    Once the spring grass comes in and it warms up some, I was hoping to cut back a little on the grain. But now she's on stall rest after a pasture accident and I've had to cut her grain in half and she's lost quite a bit of that hard-earned weight and muscle.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,569

    Default

    Ultium has been a Godsend for me - it's the only thing I found after trying a myriad of different high end choices -- that put weight on my 30 year old TB stallion and has kept it on. He looks great and feels great. He had EPM and a fractured jaw in his 20's so he can't have his teeth floated (also missing a couple) and can't chew hay or grass (gets soaked alfalfa cubes at lunch and also Senior at each meal). The Ultium was the key to his weight. I also use it on my other older horses and the results have been evident.
    PennyG



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2006
    Posts
    1,030

    Default

    Wow...nothing but positive replies! That's a first! Thanks, guys, I think I will be trying the Ultium.

    My scoop is one of the normal plastic feed scoops you can get at the feed store. I can't remember how many pounds it holds...from feel, I'd say 3ish lbs of Safe Choice but I've never been a good judge of weight.

    I like that some have said they stay quiet on it...with a not great turnout situation what I don't want is a feed that will turn him into a fire breathing dragon.
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. (Aristotle)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2003
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Oh man I should have looked for this thread before I posted mine! This may answer whether I switch my TB gelding to safe choice! I feed my boy (16 hands) about 5.5 to 6 pounds of Ultium a day split over three feedings. If your scoop is like mine it holds two pounds. He is on Quiessance, Grand Hoof and Cosequin ASU for supplements. My vet also wanted him on MegaSel because we are in a selenium deficient area and we have no pasture.

    Becky & the boys
    Becky & Red
    In Loving Memory of Gabriel, 1998-2005 and Raalph, 1977-2013



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2003
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    663

    Default

    Well, there are always people who diss Purina products but I have been feeding Ultium to TBs for a couple years now and it does a great job of keeping them fat and shiny, without an obvious increase in silliness, from what I can see. I also like the Purina top dressing Amplify ( 30% fat) when you need it to boost weight. The Ultium has Amplify in it for its fat content. We just bought a new horse ( Appy)who needs about 100 pounds so I am slowly changing him over to Ultium as well to see if we can bulk him up a bit, plus I like what it does for coat ( and hoof) quality. Really from what I see here, Ultium is a good low NSC feed with lots of fat for cool calories.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Ocala
    Posts
    183

    Default

    Just second/third-ing what everyone else has said.
    My 15y.o. OTTB gets about 9lbs 3x a day with about 30lbs good quality orchard grass during the eventing season (getting ridden 5-6 times a week for at least 45min).
    Obviously with this snowpocalypse he's getting less than half of that now but otherwise is has worked wonders for him. Year-round he is shiny and round and happy without bouncing off the walls.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2006
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    737

    Default

    I'll chime in...you cannot go by a scoop. A scoop of lead bullets does not weigh the same as a scoop of cotton balls, it is only the same volume.
    Weigh the feed, you can balance a kitchen or postage scale to zero, with a scoop on it (so it compensates for just the scoop weight, and add feed til it reaches a pound, two pounds, three pounds, etc. and mark each increment. Keep that scoop then, just for Ultium, and if you are using several kinds of feed, just have a scoop for each, marked with pound increments. YOur horses are worth having an extra scoop or two around.
    What would you try if you knew you would not fail?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2003
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,231

    Default

    I don't think that you would be able to necessarily feed "less" of the Ultium, as it's primarily beet pulp. So 7 pounds daily isn't really all that much. I can't see the point of feeding some tiny amount like a cup at all, as there's no way a horse would be getting enough nutrients/minerals on that small amount.

    Ditto to everyone who has said that you really need to know what weight you're feeding, as volume is not at all comparable.
    "Why would anybody come here if they had a pony? Who leaves a country packed with ponies to come to a non-pony country? It doesn't make sense!"



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2006
    Location
    Williamston, NC
    Posts
    1,515

    Default

    Can you up the hay? Many of my horses get 4-5 flakes overnight and have access to hay (good quality round bales) during the day. I have one horse on Ultium. Previously I had tried Ultium with another horse. He ended up higher than a kite. Pure nuts. Surprised me because he was transitioning from TC Complete which should be fairly compatible. Anyways I do have one TB on Ultium at this time. He is getting 7# (slightly underweight) split into 3 feedings. I am about ready to start cutting him back. He is calm, good energy, attention span. Overall I'm pleased and have considered switching another horse over to this feed.

    Ditto to what's been said about the Amplify. Good stuff if you have a horse who needs extra fat/calories.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    1,225

    Default

    My OTTB went crazy on Ultium. He was getting 6 lbs of 10% sweet feed per day, which I was supplementing with all kinds of stuff, and decided to switch to Ultium.

    His energy level went through the roof and he was awful to ride. Not sure if it was the higher protein levels plus high-ish sugar conent that set him off.

    I have had MUCH better luck with Buckeye Cadence.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2005
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    I have been feeding Purina feeds for over 40 yrs. While I have all ponies now (and one Appendix QH), I have had many horses of many breeds over the years and have always been pleased with Purina feeds. I feed all my stallions Ultium as they tend to become harder keepers in breeding season, and I am always pleased with their weight maintenance as well as their behavior. With approx. 30 ponies we have to be very careful about starch intake, etc, and I also feed Buckeye SafeNeasy to the easy keepers and add Buckeye Unbeetable to the ones that need a bit extra. For the young and growing ones as well as the breeding mares, we feed Strategy. As far as Ultium goes, I have been very pleased with it.
    Quicksilver Farms, LLC
    "Welsh Hunter Ponies"
    Welsh Sec. B Stallions and
    Fancy Show Pony Prospects
    www.quicksilverponies.com



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2005
    Location
    Out in The Country
    Posts
    1,924

    Default

    Supposedly, Ultium should calm a horse is what the feed guy said - he was told by the Purina rep. Ultium has been a God send for the 15 year old 17.3 TB I had that is so hard to feed and he has not been the slightest bit hotter or anything.

    However, my 18 year old TB was a little strung out and so was the appy mare (who is a registered appy and 5 years old but she is really 70% TB in her blood). However, they have also been holed up due to the bad weather .... Both the mare and the older TB - I switched her to safechoice and switched the 18 year old to half and half ultium and safechoice which I know some thing should not be done (mixing). BUT the Ultium as I said did not make the 15 year old Tb hot at all. He is NO different at all except has put on weight.

    HOWEVER, with everything you are doing - if your horse's coat is not shiney - something else is wrong. A horse that lives in the pasture off grass and hay only will often has a glossy coat. It should come from within.

    MAYBE you are OVER supplementing? Maybe you should tone it down and simplify? Ultium is one way of simplifying - it has beet pulp, rice bran and is a balanced complete feed so you should be able to feed at and not supplement anything else unless there is a health issue.

    Something you can try too - not to ADD to your supplements because as I said - it seems like you are supplementing him to death.... is FLAXSEED. I had had a lot of horses come to me with not only ugly coats that are not glossy - but also sunbleached and dry - and I buy pure unground flax and grind it myself - and it works MAGIC. In a month, most people do not recognize the horse AND - for instance, 2 dark bays I have had to feed - came to me with ugly sunbleached coats - in a month they had almost black, shiney coats and could stand in the sun without bleaching out. Not sure how....



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2006
    Posts
    1,030

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LaraNSpeedy View Post
    Supposedly, Ultium should calm a horse is what the feed guy said - he was told by the Purina rep. Ultium has been a God send for the 15 year old 17.3 TB I had that is so hard to feed and he has not been the slightest bit hotter or anything.

    However, my 18 year old TB was a little strung out and so was the appy mare (who is a registered appy and 5 years old but she is really 70% TB in her blood). However, they have also been holed up due to the bad weather .... Both the mare and the older TB - I switched her to safechoice and switched the 18 year old to half and half ultium and safechoice which I know some thing should not be done (mixing). BUT the Ultium as I said did not make the 15 year old Tb hot at all. He is NO different at all except has put on weight.

    HOWEVER, with everything you are doing - if your horse's coat is not shiney - something else is wrong. A horse that lives in the pasture off grass and hay only will often has a glossy coat. It should come from within.

    MAYBE you are OVER supplementing? Maybe you should tone it down and simplify? Ultium is one way of simplifying - it has beet pulp, rice bran and is a balanced complete feed so you should be able to feed at and not supplement anything else unless there is a health issue.

    Something you can try too - not to ADD to your supplements because as I said - it seems like you are supplementing him to death.... is FLAXSEED. I had had a lot of horses come to me with not only ugly coats that are not glossy - but also sunbleached and dry - and I buy pure unground flax and grind it myself - and it works MAGIC. In a month, most people do not recognize the horse AND - for instance, 2 dark bays I have had to feed - came to me with ugly sunbleached coats - in a month they had almost black, shiney coats and could stand in the sun without bleaching out. Not sure how....
    Thanks for your thoughts. I believe I will add the flax to the Ultium.

    My thought has also been that I have over-complicated his feeding routine. It sounds like feeding Ultium would be a big step towards simplifying.

    Do you all still feed Probiotics while on Ultium? I usually keep this guy on them because he tends to be a hard keeper with a sensitive stomach.

    I am pretty sure he had a tapeworm; we usually don't worm for tapeworms at this time of year, but after my farrier noticed his poor, dry coat quality and some general soreness, he recommended worming for the tapes. Said he had recently seen horses that looked similar who after being wormed for tapes at the recommendation of a vet, cleared up and got shiny again.

    I wormed him a week ago and his coat quality is improving and becoming shinier, so I do think this was part of the problem.

    But I also feel like his feeding regimen is too complicated and requires too much effort to keep him looking good...hopefully the Ultium will help solve these problems.
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. (Aristotle)



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2009
    Posts
    788

    Default

    I know I'm a bit late to this thread but I'm glad I read it....I just switched my super hard keeper to Ultium and this makes me feel better about it as I have been struggling with what to do to help my guy. His coat quality has not been great despite my best efforts. I had added in flax a little bit ago but he was not seeming to like his food (beet pulp with a senior/well solve l/s mix). He is very sensitive in his stomach and ulcer prone...seems like this could help. I am crossing my fingers. He is actually eating the ultium (mixed with a bit of beet pulp) which is progress at least
    My blog:

    RAWR



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Posts
    257

    Default

    We had one of our racehorses on Ultium, but we mixed it 50/50 with Strategy. He ate 12 lbs. a day in three feedings and free choice alfalfa mix hay. He did fantastically awsome coat increase in muscle mass and liked it. I am not suggesting you feed this much, obviously my horse was in intensive work and was a 16.2 1200 lb. stallion. But I would increase the amount you are feeding according to work load. If he is not carring enough weight then he needs more food not all horses can be easy keepers. Good luck.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    727

    Default

    My SSH lost alot of weight last summer when he ate something toxic and developed liver issues. My vet had me switch him to Ultium and Equine Senior - she said that is the best combination for weight gain. It worked quite well and I've kept him on Ultium and Seminole Sweet feed as that is what the barn provides.

    Note this is surgical vet worked at Palm Beach Equine a top facility in Wellington that deals with all the warmbloods, polo horses, jumpers etc that are in Wellington in the season and throughout the year.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Oct. 27, 2011, 11:12 PM
  2. Does anyone know what is in Ultium?
    By Bank of Dad in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct. 27, 2011, 11:01 AM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: Jul. 22, 2011, 03:45 PM
  4. Does Ultium contain soy?
    By stryder in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Mar. 13, 2011, 07:11 PM
  5. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jun. 24, 2009, 11:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •