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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2009
    Location
    Mission,B.C
    Posts
    721

    Default sending horse off for training vs. involved in training

    i have just moved my wonderful wb x gelding to a new barn good barn,nice pasture,a tad muddy in winter,but anyways i have asked the onsite trainer about hiring her to help me with my guy,now she is the type of trainer that wants to do all the training herself and wants to rush things in the training.i am totally the opposite of what i want to do.i was involved in a my horses training with all the other ones.i love doing that way and there is less confusion for horse and rider later on when its owners turn to ride their horse.i know there is good and bad about both sides,but another thing is that this trainer was not flexible in training ways.to me i would be more flexible i was a pro rider/trainer.
    pm me if you need more explainin'



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2009
    Posts
    665

    Default

    Sounds like you sort of know the answer to your question.

    If you don't trust your trainer, the situation won't work. If you can explain to her that you want to go slowly and she is okay with that, then great. If you talk to her and she says that she has a program that she's going to do with or without you, I'd find a new trainer.

    Any which way, if you are a hands on kind of person, ride the horse in lessons and have her teach you. It's definitely a slower process that way and sometimes more difficult for the trainer, but it allows you to learn with the horse. Then have her get on a couple times a week (if you're comfortable) to school.



  3. #3
    hfarm Guest

    Default

    So if I understand correctly you want the "trainer" to do it your way. That seems completely backwards. You approached the trainer and you are not a trainer, so let her do her job if you don't like the way she trains then get someone else. It sounds like you just need to hire yourself a cheerleader not a trainer.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2009
    Location
    Mission,B.C
    Posts
    721

    Default

    I think you misunderstood. I have worked with a trainer before with other horses and I find it a very good bonding experience. This gelding is just 2 yrs old. He cannot be ridden just yet, he needs training first. Of course, I want a trainer that is sensitive to my style. I am just disappointed that she is so inflexible because now I have to look for another trainer to work with and it would have been handy to have someone so close. what methods have other people used? send your horse away to be trained, clinics, etc. I would be interested to hear what other methods have been successful, that riders were happy with the result.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2008
    Posts
    913

    Default

    so find someone else? Each trainer has their own methods and style. I would be annoyed if someone said they wanted me to train their horse and then told me how, when, why to do it. Find a trainer you click with or train the horse yourself and take lessons.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Posts
    4,543

    Default

    are you saying that your 'style' is to be more involved with your horse's training than this trainer wants owners to be? or is it something that goes deeper? for me, i much prefer to have my owners involved in thier horse's training. it's thier horse, not mine, and if the ultimate goal is to have a horse that the owner can ride on thier own, without me hovering like the proverbial mother hen, then....



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,208

    Default

    Define "involved".

    Do you mean just keeping tabs, watching and learning and observing? Or do you mean telling the trainer what to do.

    Big difference.

    Bottom line...if you think this trainer will rush your colt and not train properly? Why on earth would you pay them to do so? It's not about bonding-it is an important business decision and you are not hiring the trainer to be your BFF but to train the horse.

    If you want to bond and a friend? Be friends. But pick a trainer you trust to take your money.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2009
    Location
    Mission,B.C
    Posts
    721

    Default

    involved means as follows trainer explains what their doing,owner watches and then trainer lets owner try exercise or whatever was taught and then does it them selves while trainer/instructor gives instruction on the side so it is done correctly.
    i will be looking for someone else..im not saying her method id bad im just saying that my way of being taught was different.im sure either way is successful in their own right.thanx for all of you who replied to my post



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    14,951

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by my_doran View Post
    involved means as follows trainer explains what their doing,owner watches and then trainer lets owner try exercise or whatever was taught and then does it them selves while trainer/instructor gives instruction on the side so it is done correctly.
    i will be looking for someone else..im not saying her method id bad im just saying that my way of being taught was different.im sure either way is successful in their own right.thanx for all of you who replied to my post

    What you describe in the first paragraph is the only way I fly as an owner. I don't have to be there for every last ride, but I do want to know what's going in, in part so that my rides are consistent with what my trainer is doing.

    I also want to do better myself, so I like to watch and learn.

    As a reasonably capable owner who did most of the training before I turned to the pro, I am guilty of having established the horse's base. I know what he knows, what he doesn't, how I approached things, what his reactions, glitches and holes are. The trainer needs to know all this back story in order to do a good job for the horse.

    I don't think a novel approach is bad--

    if my horse is secure and sound/strong enough to do what the trainer has in mind.

    if the trainer doesn't radically change the rules and scare the pants off him

    if I can understand the logic behind what they'd like to try.

    If any of these ingredients is missing, I pass on the help.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



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