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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles County, CA
    Posts
    165

    Unhappy If a breeder has a horse priced at $10k or Best Offer...

    ... what could I offer? I am the ONLY one who has ever come to look at the horse, and he has beeen for sale for more than a year. (Maybe longer than that) I've been up to to the barn where he's boarded at lately, and it appears he has not been turned out or worked for several days. He lives outside in a 1/2-cover corral (I'm in SoCal, so that's common), and a couple of weeks ago when it was pouring down rain, he was left out in it with no rain sheet or anything. The footing in the corral stays muddy for a long time, and he is rarely taken out.

    I lost a lot of money within the last few months, and could only offer a fraction ($4k) of the price. But with his condition currently, I don't think he'd be worth the asking price anymore. He's a sweet boy (nickers and gives me kisses everytime I see him, which is fairly often ), and when he was worked (which, like I said, looks like it hasn't been for a while, probably since sometime before Christmas), he was doing 2'6, had flying changes (don't know if they were auto, because I never saw him jump, and only rode him twice W/T/), but always was turned out before I rode him. He was a joy to ride, though-- very light in the hands and nice off the leg (if you wore smalll spurs, anyway ). He also rarely gets his feet trimmed-- last time he had it done (in early November), he had not been trimmed for what was probably 4-6 months. This was on account of the breeder/owner not being able to afford it. And it's only $40-50!

    I feel like I need to do something (that is, buy him), but I don't know what to do.... his owner was rather rude to me when I last spoke to her in November. I could always make my offer to the trainer, as she's the one mostly responsible for him... but I'm so afraid they'll say no to my offer. And I really love him and have become super-attached to him. What can I do?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

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    All you can do is make the offer. Will they accept it? Hard to say. I would approach the trainer and just tell her that you really like the horse and feel he would be a good match for you. I think I would not get into the condition of the horse etc, that could turn them off. Just tell the trainer that your funds to purchase are limited. However, before doing so make SURE that realistically YOU can afford to properly care for him. If you can only spend $4K to buy him, are you in a good enough position financially to afford a horse? You don't say if you have had a horse previosuly, if you are working, etc. Don't go into this because you feel sorry for the horse, and then find you cannot afford him either, not fair to the horse



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    Keswick, VA
    Posts
    7,872

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    Make an offer. Not your top one. Do not go into the whys, just tell the trainer (I suspect they're probably not getting paid either, from the sound of the situation, and they will be a good advocate for you) you'll take the horse at X price. If they don't accept X price, then ask what they WILL accept. Then decide if you can afford that and if the horse is worth it. Take the emotion out of it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,282

    Default

    You can talk to the trainer or the owner... say I really like him, I really want to own him, I think he and I would be great for each other, but because of the economy my horse shopping money is not what it once was and I can only offer you X amount. I know it isn't what you are asking, but I can promise him a great home.

    Absolutely don't go on about his lack of care, or the fact that he is currently not worth what they are asking.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    965

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    The horse is for sale at $10,000 and you want to offer $4,000? You can ask, but don't be surprised to get a no. That is really a lowball of an offer.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    Posts
    579

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    If you're polite, say that you like the horse, and make an offer you can't lose. If they say no, say thank you, that you understand their position, ask if you can still visit the horse, and cut your losses. In this climate people may take a lowball.

    To those who think someone on a limited purchase budget can't afford a horse, it's simply not true. When my mare sells I'll have that much money to buy the next horse. I can add to that slowly (money I would otherwise spend on board), but it takes two months or more to add 1K to purchase funds (and personally I would put some of that money into building up emergency funds, show funds, and only a fraction into purchase). 4K is a reasonable amount of money, and it has NO impact on one's ability to care for a horse.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles County, CA
    Posts
    165

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thames Pirate View Post
    If you're polite, say that you like the horse, and make an offer you can't lose. If they say no, say thank you, that you understand their position, ask if you can still visit the horse, and cut your losses. In this climate people may take a lowball.

    To those who think someone on a limited purchase budget can't afford a horse, it's simply not true. When my mare sells I'll have that much money to buy the next horse. I can add to that slowly (money I would otherwise spend on board), but it takes two months or more to add 1K to purchase funds (and personally I would put some of that money into building up emergency funds, show funds, and only a fraction into purchase). 4K is a reasonable amount of money, and it has NO impact on one's ability to care for a horse.

    To your first part:Thank you, that absolutely makes sense. I plan to do that.
    To the second part: Hallelujah! That's so true. Just because one doesn't have $10k+ for a purchase price doesn't mean they cannot afford to care for one.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles County, CA
    Posts
    165

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatScaryChick View Post
    The horse is for sale at $10,000 and you want to offer $4,000? You can ask, but don't be surprised to get a no. That is really a lowball of an offer.
    I realize that... which is exactly why I have not made an offer.

    And like I said, that's what she WANTS, but it's not what he's WORTH. And the issue is that he is rarely taken care of. Sure, he gets fed everyday, but that's about it. They let MONTHS go by between trimmings on his bare feet, let him stand out in the rain and freeze, let him stand in mud and muck for days after the rain's over, and almost never work him. And lord only knows when the last time he saw a vet was.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thames Pirate View Post
    If you're polite, say that you like the horse, and make an offer you can't lose. If they say no, say thank you, that you understand their position, ask if you can still visit the horse, and cut your losses. In this climate people may take a lowball.

    To those who think someone on a limited purchase budget can't afford a horse, it's simply not true. When my mare sells I'll have that much money to buy the next horse. I can add to that slowly (money I would otherwise spend on board), but it takes two months or more to add 1K to purchase funds (and personally I would put some of that money into building up emergency funds, show funds, and only a fraction into purchase). 4K is a reasonable amount of money, and it has NO impact on one's ability to care for a horse.
    I never said that the OP could not afford the upkeep of said horse. I just told her to look very carefully at the costs, as should ANYONE, prior to purchase, particularly if she has never actually owned a horse before.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,521

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    I agree with folks here, about contacting the trainer, and making your offer.

    I strongly urge you to be professional, emphasize the match, and do not talk to them about the condition of the horse. Just make the offer. If they say no, they may reconsider months down the road, so let them know you would like to be contacted if they would like to reconsider.

    You keep going on about his condition, I am just afraid you are going to say something to them, which will put them off. I wouldn't, if you want to get the horse.

    If THEY bring up the fact that he's out of condition, you can agree, but just emphasize that he's a great match for you, and what a wonderful home he will have with you and that this is your purchasing budget, will they consider your offer?

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    894

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    You never know I would offer, I know some one who put a $200000 offer on a property they were asking $1.2 million for, and they accepted it 6 months later..... So it never hurts to try...



    Just go to the trainer say this is what I have, if at any they want to settle for this price please call me. Or see if they will do a lease to own with a $4000 down payment? Who knows some people are desperate to sell.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2000
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    8,140

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    And like I said, that's what she WANTS, but it's not what he's WORTH. And the issue is that he is rarely taken care of. Sure, he gets fed everyday, but that's about it. They let MONTHS go by between trimmings on his bare feet, let him stand out in the rain and freeze, let him stand in mud and muck for days after the rain's over, and almost never work him. And lord only knows when the last time he saw a vet was.
    This is not your issue. At all.

    Your only issue is A) you want horse and B) you're a good home and C) you can only offer X. Stick to that, because I'd imagine if for one second you insinuated the breeder's horsemanship skills were subpar she'll NEVER sell that horse to you.
    ---
    They're small hearts.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2009
    Location
    NC piedmont
    Posts
    2,305

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    I agree with those who have said do NOT bring the horse's current condition into the negotiations-if you make the owner defensive they'll likely say no. I'd do a little research in your area-are horses of comparable breed, size, age, and type with comparable training and show mileage going for $4000? If so, make the offer. If not, you're likely lowballing too much. However, if the owner can't even afford trimming, she may take $4000 to get out from under the horse's bills. She may also take a payment plan if she's getting desparate.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2009
    Location
    The Great Plains of Canada
    Posts
    3,066

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    It completely depends, they might take the 4K, they might not, but they have no chance to accept it if you never make the offer. I concur with the others re: not mentioning his true value or condition. Emphasize you will pay cash 'today' and are willing to give him a great home, that you think you would be a good match for him. If they say no, ask if they would accept a downpayment and a payment plan to pay off the rest of a previously-settled-upon price, if you are that serious about him and can afford such a deal.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,096

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    If you don't ask it will be no, if you do ask then it is 50/50. I inquired about leasing a horse a year ago that was listed for sale at $4500, the owner said no. I saw the same horse yesterday listed for $1500.

    Dawn



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2007
    Location
    Central NJ / NYC
    Posts
    147

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    I say tell the trainer (who I presume you have a relationship with, as you see the horse often) that you really like the horse, but cant offer what they are asking, and say you think its a great match, and do you think they'd consider a low offer but a good match and home. Make clear that you have money for his keep but not a ton for purchase price. Say you really like the horse, hes got potential and you're willing to work to bring it out. They can do math on how much that is in board and bills.

    What you are trying to do is get the trainer to see the potential here, for everyone, *without* mentioning that things aren't great for the guy now.

    Figure out what the horse is really worth, in your head, in current condition. Hes a retrain? On principle I doubt I'd pay anywhere near asking price for a horse who is in need of work and an upgrade, ESP that asking price.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2007
    Location
    Pontiac, MI
    Posts
    1,352

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    10k for a horse that does 2'6" sounds a little high, yikes! I've seen horses doing that go for $2000 or less. And having been on the market for over a year, they really expect to sell him for that in this economy?

    Definitely talk to the *trainer*, and definitely do not make mention of his current condition.

    Ask if you can try him again, WTC him, maybe pop him over a few jumps and make your offer after that. The worst that can happen is they say no. And don't start out with your top offer, of course!



  18. #18
    rec-rider Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatScaryChick View Post
    The horse is for sale at $10,000 and you want to offer $4,000? You can ask, but don't be surprised to get a no. That is really a lowball of an offer.
    My horse was priced at $20,000. They told me to make an offer. I told them any offer I made would be insulting... they told me to go ahead anyways. My offer was $5,000. Two weeks later I picked up my horse. Never hurts to try!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2009
    Posts
    131

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    yes it is a lowball offer but if the horse has been for sale for that long, chances are the owner just wants to sell him and might entertain your offer. 4k is better than no money and having to keep paying upkeep on the horse.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
    Posts
    8,581

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    Don't approach the owner, deal with the trainer. He/she is more likely to be realistic about what the horse is worth and not have the emotion involved that an owner might. Owners often overprice because they don't understand the market, or are emotional about the horse.

    Of course, no owners here are guilty of the above, ever.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



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