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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2009
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    566

    Cool Meredith Manor- Who's gone?

    I am hopefully going to start Winter 2010, but how many of you have gone or want to attend? Do you think of the program itself and the school as a whole?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2001
    Location
    Bryan,Texas
    Posts
    2,261

    Default

    Was there in 1982-3. Can't tell you what's current there now, other than from when I graduated, to now there have been alot of changes. Reputation was high, then very low.
    There are quite a few who post here that have been to MM earlier and later than myself.
    Good luck in what you decide.
    I would recommend and college education, as in a degree, to fall back on if whatever career in horses does not work. Perhaps a degree in accounting or something practical so that if something should happen like an injury that may prevent you from an active horse career. better than flipping burgers at Mcdonalds, unless that is also a goal.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2009
    Location
    College View
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    I was also there in the early 80's! For summer sessions. The first time I was there it was great. The second time I think it was just after Kay Meredith left... it was not great. haven't paid much attention to it since.

    I second what jcotton says... go someplace that you can get a degree in a fall-back career.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    South of the Mason-Dixon Line
    Posts
    2,321

    Default

    Here is one fairly recent thread on the subject of MM. If you search I am sure more will come up.

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...Meredith+Manor

    I have not been there but have had experience with two "professionals" who were graduates of MM. Neither were worth their salt in their chosen profession. Not sure that they are indicative of the school's product as a whole.....
    Ridge Farm Inc.-full care retirement
    http://www.horseretirementfarm.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,914

    Default

    I know of one person that graduated from their riding program. She is hard working, teaches beginner lessons and mucks stalls.

    The one that graduated from their farrier program can barely form a complete sentance. I'll stop there.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Posts
    171

    Default

    I've yet to hear anything good about the program. I think I would rather find a working student position then go there if I was in your shoes.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,439

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    Forget the "equine college". In my experience, most graduate and go on to: drum roll, mucking. Go to a public/private college, major in anything but "equine ____". Find a working student position during summer and, if possible, during the school year. Take lessons. Teach at a summer riding camp. Get some real experience. That's what counts in the horse business. You know what they say: "Want to make a million dollars in the horse business? Start with two million!"

    Forewarned is forearmed.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,128

    Default

    I have known two grads and neither were especially good riders or teachers. One claimed to have ridden to "olympic" level dressage (GP) while there, but could barely string together a Training Level test. I would spend my money on a real college that gets you a real degree. Good luck whatever you decide to do.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Posts
    2,255

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tarynls View Post
    The one that graduated from their farrier program can barely form a complete sentance. I'll stop there.

    this is funny for a few reasons.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
    Posts
    11,068

    Default

    I thought about going there but realized if I took the courses I thought I should have it would cost in the tens of thousands of dollars. Knowing what the horse industry pays I also realized I would never, ever recoup the money expended in my lifetime....

    I would rather see you get into Bazy Tankersley's two year program rather than go to Meredith Manor: http://www.al-marah.com/apprenticeprogram.html .

    In the meantime, go to a regular college or junior college and take some business and writing classes instead!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Here's one more suggestion for the pile... look for colleges that have riding programs, or are at least in a "horsey" area where you can continue riding at college. There are many very good schools where you can minor in equestrian studies with a major in something else that might pay decently enough for you to actually own horses after college. Most of the people I know that majored solely in "equine studies" basically took a lot of lessons at college. For ex they took a semester of "driving" which amounted to some theory in a classroom and then they went out and learned to drive with an instructor. Well, heck, I did that and I didn't pay $700/semester hour to do it either.
    One of my daughter's former riding teachers was a Meredith Manor graduate. Yes, she ran her own lesson barn, but some health problems caught up with her in her 40s (why we had to move on) so she ended up taking a job as a church secretary or something like that, which pays next to nothing. She doesn't have any other skills. So like the other posters suggested, make sure you learn skills that you will be able to put in place in a broad variety of situations.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2002
    Location
    Idaho USA
    Posts
    1,880

    Default

    Have you looked at UK? They offer a real degrees and they can be horse related too. Otherwise start in a college that has a riding program on the side, or that is near a good instructor. Some Jcs have a horsey minor that you can get while working toward your 4 yr degree.

    You could always look to a votech degree in something that makes money and be a WS to get your horse experience.

    Our experience with a MM grad was terrible. We leased him a nice QH mare for him to begin his teaching business. She came home a complete train wreck. She would have taken years to fix, so she retired to the pasture.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2009
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theoldgreymare View Post

    I have not been there but have had experience with two "professionals" who were graduates of MM. Neither were worth their salt in their chosen profession. Not sure that they are indicative of the school's product as a whole.....
    I second this.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh,Pennsylvaina
    Posts
    4,029

    Default

    My trainer's gone there.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2003
    Location
    Nonsuch House
    Posts
    3,507

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffany! View Post
    My trainer's gone there.
    Rut ro. . .
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2001
    Location
    Bryan,Texas
    Posts
    2,261

    Default

    When I went to MM, in '82-3, it was just after Kay Meredith left. The two dressage instructors were good as was Jo Struby for those who wanted to do jumping and eventing. Then there was Jim Skidmore for Western and Kirk Undershultz for farrier. I had no problem with any of theses intructors.
    It was when MM went into major financial problems due to the mishandling of finances by the administration -in particular Ron Meredith. MM closed down for awhile then re-opened. Looking at their website, I don't think that many of their instructors are that qualified to teach, in particular - Ron Meredith.

    Yes the housing was bare-bones but I did not go there for the housing, it was an opportunity to learn more about equestrian studies and take in useful information. I rode dressage, took the farrier classes, both leather working classes as well as the breeding course. In many ways, many classes are overviews of what you could do with more detailed classes. For me, the dressage was just a stepping stone to what I now know and a start in my dressage, since dressage in Texas was none existent at that time. For farrier work, I can do my own horses, but I prefer to hire out. Forge work was my favorite part of the farrier classes. Leatherworking was the best, I have that knowledge to fix my own tack, as well as others, when needed and blankets, too, that need repairing.
    Perfection situation, for everyone no. What I needed at that time, yes. Would I do it again, no. I would get a college degree majoring in something with equestrian studies as a minor.
    But in this day and age get a degree that is practical. There are plenty of universities that have equestrian studies as a minor with something realistic, practical as your major so you can afford to own horses.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    673

    Default

    If you want a nice equine education go to Lake Erie College in Ohio. Not only is it a REAL college, but the instruction there is better from what I hear. You can do a major in some kind of equine business management I believe. They have multiple horsie-related degrees.
    Tru : April 14, 1996 - March 14, 2011
    Thank you for everything boy.


    Better View.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eventingismylife View Post
    I am hopefully going to start Winter 2010, but how many of you have gone or want to attend? Do you think of the program itself and the school as a whole?
    As others have noted you're better off to go to a real college and get a real degree with at least a minor in a discipline that does not require great physical capability. That way when you get hurt you can still earn a living (at least while you convalesce).

    Middle TN State in Murfreesboro, TN has a good reputation around here.

    G.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2008
    Posts
    151

    Default

    I attended MM about 10 years ago, and would say my experience was so/so. It was a lot of work and you were definitely hands-on with the horses all day, but IMO their methods and theories were way off from what I would call the 'industry standard'. I did learn a lot and was able to adapt my own methods from what I learned. I was probably a little naive going in and not too familiar with the ways of the horse world, but I feel like I was kind of given the expectation that I would come out of there with a kick-@** job at the top of the pay scale... 10 years later I'm back at my old corporate job. But then again, that was my choice too. Good luck on your decision, please PM me if you'd like more info.



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