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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Default Boarding a coming 2 yr old - pasture or stall? - Picture of baby added :)

    Hi all! My mom recently took in a 20 month old colt. I am currently fostering him as he needed to be gelded and her vet doesn't have indoor facilities, so he came here for the procedure. Ended up being a good choice, because he was crypt! Her vet wouldn't even have put him under general AND was planning on just doing it outside in a snow bank

    Skye will be staying with me at least through April or May - first to heal and be indoors out of the freezing wind and rain, and then also because I'm the "ground manners" person in our family (also the "finishing" person, but my sister gets to be the "first ride and basic w/t/c" person LOL....) I board, so he's currently in a full care stall. I'd like to put him in pasture as of March, however. He has to remain in full care and a pen for turnout for at least another four weeks because our turnout is mixed - geldings and mares together.

    That said - having never boarded a baby - he should be fine on pasture board, right? Or should I keep him in full care stall board, with daily turnout? There is a filly at our barn the same age, and she's full care. But I really can't think of a reason why a two year old couldn't go to pasture - anyone have thoughts?

    My sister and I are very hands on, so if he needs grain (he's on Mare and Foal right now) that's not a problem. More convenient on full care of course. Our pasture board pasture is about 30 acres with about 15 horses on it. My sister's two are pasture boarded in that pasture, and we intend to introduce Skye to Beau and Mel so he has some "buddies" when he's turned out. The pasture horses are on alfalfa mix round bales during the winter, so he'd be free choice. In a stall they get fed twice per day, not free choice.

    Anyway - opinions? Anything I should be concerned about? Anyone have a "no way would I put a 20 yr old horse in a pasture board situation" stance? Thanks!
    Last edited by Tif_Ann; Jan. 23, 2010 at 04:39 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Location
    Dungeon of the Ivory Tower
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    20,393

    Default

    Pasture board.
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2006
    Posts
    1,090

    Default

    Pasture board, while 15 horses seems like a lot, 30 acres is enough room and I think it's a good idea to let him buddy up with a couple of the herd 1st.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2003
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    Up the creek from bar.ka
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    10,068

    Default

    Pasture board if you can find it. Being out 24x7 is the best thing for those babies!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    Pasture Board. My 2 1/2 year old pony gelding is currently on pasture board, living with an older mare. He's doing great....I love the fact that he gets to move around all day and night. I bring him in to groom him and work on groundwork in the late afternoon, then he goes right back outside. He is really happy out there.
    <3 Vinnie <3
    1992-2010
    Jackie's Punt ("Bailey") My Finger Lakes Finest Thoroughbred



  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post

    Anyway - opinions? Anything I should be concerned about? Anyone have a "no way would I put a 20 mo old horse in a pasture board situation" stance? Thanks!

    I would only really want him in with his own gender and age....but that is me...

    I don't do any mixed herds at all....

    he'll be low dog in a big way every where he turns and there is more to that than just keeping him with a shot at the hay....

    horses who are overly harassed as babies grow up weird, just my opinion

    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,506

    Default

    I agree about pasture board as long as he is handled daily. One thing about bringing them into a stall even for a short time every day is that they are haltered and led in and out twice a day. That few minutes of manners training IMO goes a long way towards creating a solid citizen - especially as 2-3 years old.

    They are typically pretty easy until two, then some turn into the equivalent of tweens who need a little work to keep their heads in the right places.

    It sounds like you and your sister handle him quite a lot, it's important to keep doing that as it is easy to turn them out and let them be for decent stretches - then one day you bring them in to do something and they have developed a bit of 'tude.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2005
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
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    Default

    Pasture board is SO much better for the babies And the wallet. Best of both worlds!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2007
    Location
    Somewhere between here and there
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    262

    Default

    Pasture! I have a 3yr old that is living in a run-in situation and he LOVES it. We handle him on a regular basis and he will go for 60 days of training in the spring. But when he come home, he will go right back outside. I wish my daughters warmblood would do that. He is way too much of a Diva and loves his stall. Good luck with your baby!
    Drop the drama and ride!



  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    I would only really want him in with his own gender and age....but that is me...

    I don't do any mixed herds at all....

    he'll be low dog in a big way every where he turns and there is more to that than just keeping him with a shot at the hay....

    horses who are overly harassed as babies grow up weird, just my opinion

    Tamara in TN

    I'd do pasture board IF there is a horse or two in the herd that you (OP) think would take him under their wing and keep him from getting into too much trouble. We've got a couple of babysitter geldings at the rescue I volunteer at and they keep an eye on the younger ones.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2004
    Location
    Nescopeck PA
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    I would pasture board UNLESS he's not been socialized in a herd. In my experience horses that are brought up with only their mother, or only other foals of the same age are not great candidates for a big herd situation. My foals are in a mixed herd. Currently they are with pregnant mares, barren mares and yearling to four year old fillies and geldings. They do very well when they leave my farm and go to a new herd, or with another youngster, or another older buddy. They learn to socialize with all ages. If he's only been brought up with other yearlings you may have problems. What he can do to a yearling, he can't necessarily do to a 15 year old mare. But that is just my opinion and experience.
    Maria Hayes-Frosty Oak Stables
    Home to All Eyez On Me, 1998 16.2 Cleveland Bay Sporthorse Stallion
    & FrostyOak Hampton 2008 Pure Cleveland Bay Colt
    www.frostyoaks.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    7,136

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    Youngsters of ANY age need a lot of room to run, to develop their lungs and other organs. Keeping them in the equivalent of a hall closet is not going to develop their social skills OR physiques.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Thanks everyone!

    Re: babysitter - they are priceless, aren't they? My Tommy is a wonderful babysitter, and he was the one who got turned out with the filly for a few weeks before she went into the big herd as well. Skye did spend some time turned out with Tommy before he came here. BUT Tommy isn't in that pasture ... so it makes it tough.

    Aspenlucas - that's the kind of thing I am worried about. From what we know if his history, he was not in a herd. He was with his mother, and then in a small pen with a filly his age. It's possible he had some turnout - my dad said he was "in a pen with other horses" when he went to pick him up. My mom got him in December, and he spent about three weeks in her pens ... but he had to be separated from the rest of her horses because she has mares. The only thing we know for sure is he's spent time with my Tommy. He has been introduced to a couple of the horses at our barn already, and he's very respectful and well mannered, but who knows....

    Either way, however, he's going to be turned out into a herd at least part of the day. If he stays in a full care stall, our turnout is in another large pasture. The stall horses are turned out together (about 27 of them) in another pasture for about 8-12 hours per day. And this time of year they are in our "rotation" pasture - it's about 15 acres maybe - because the large turnout pasture (30 acres) is full of very large snow drifts and unsafe. Because of this, there is nowhere for him to get turned out temporarily into a smaller group, like the filly was able to do.

    We have one other pasture, which my nearly blind horse is in - it's a small, 3 acre pasture that has 2 full time pasture horses and one full care horse turned out to it. However, the barn owner limits that pasture to three horses. I don't think that is an option for him, and honestly, I want him to "be a horse" as well. I'd like him in a bigger pasture and to socialize. About the best we can do is make sure he gets bonding time with my sister's two horses. Her mare is alpha mare in that pasture, and we're hoping she'll take him under her wing. We'll see though.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,264

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    Transition him carefully, make sure he has buddies that will be out with him prior to turning him out full time, and make sure there is enough room around the bales for him to get in. By mid-winter the pecking order around the bales is pretty well established, and if there isn't enough room for a newbie to get into the hay without being chased off and kept away from the source, this won't work, regardless of how well socialized he is. Just a thought.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2004
    Location
    Nescopeck PA
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    1,843

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post
    Thanks everyone!
    Aspenlucas - that's the kind of thing I am worried about. From what we know if his history, he was not in a herd. He was with his mother, and then in a small pen with a filly his age. It's possible he had some turnout - my dad said he was "in a pen with other horses" when he went to pick him up. My mom got him in December, and he spent about three weeks in her pens ... but he had to be separated from the rest of her horses because she has mares. The only thing we know for sure is he's spent time with my Tommy. He has been introduced to a couple of the horses at our barn already, and he's very respectful and well mannered, but who knows....
    If you've turned him out with older horses you have an idea how he is going to react. I've only purchased a few youngsters in my time. My most recent was the pure Cleveland Bay colt I brought in from CO to PA. No fault of the owner of the mare, she only had the mare and the foal. He has ZERO-NILCH socialization. My mare herd is pretty friendly and they didn't push him, but he just didn't get it. It took him a good two weeks and a banged up knee to figure things out. Luckily he was ok. Could I have separated him into a herd of only his age? Sure! But in the end to be a happy/healthy horse, he needed to be introduced to everyone. Especially as he is a stallion prospect. I want him with others as long as he can be, and would LOVE for him to live out with some of my mares when he's older. So this was important to me.

    Keep an eye on him, if he can get a couple friends first you may be better off. They can take him under their wing or at least tolerate him. Good luck!
    Maria Hayes-Frosty Oak Stables
    Home to All Eyez On Me, 1998 16.2 Cleveland Bay Sporthorse Stallion
    & FrostyOak Hampton 2008 Pure Cleveland Bay Colt
    www.frostyoaks.com



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,112

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    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    I agree about pasture board as long as he is handled daily. One thing about bringing them into a stall even for a short time every day is that they are haltered and led in and out twice a day. That few minutes of manners training IMO goes a long way towards creating a solid citizen - especially as 2-3 years old.
    This. Even once a day and just a handful of grain if they don't need grain. Just so he is handled and associates stalls with something good. You don't want a horse that is so barn sour because of pasture board that he/she tries to climb out of the stall-I've seen it.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2005
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    in the saddle
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    4,149

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    Until what age you board your youngsters together? At what age do you merge them to the multi age heard?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Thanks again Luckily he'll have another month in his stall and the turn out is going to happen in March. I did turn him out in the arena with my mustang this morning and they got along very well. Skye does need to figure out that Pi is blind and deaf on the right, and nearly blind on the left, though, cuz he cut Pi off twice while they were trotting around the arena and Pi ran right into him both times Pi was gelded at seven, and retains a lot of "stallion" behaviors, and I thought it would be interesting to see them interact since Skye was just gelded on Monday. Lots of arched necks and front legs striking out. But for the most part Skye just followed him around (after Pirate got done snaking his neck at him and making him move all around the arena LOL) and they did a lot of sniffing and nibbling at each other. Skye did get warned by me, though, when he took a mouthful of Pi's mane. You don't touch Pi's mane!!

    Here's the boy in question, meeting my other boy.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/3546815...01/4297952119/

    Pi's only 14.3, so you can see he's a little boy - hopefully he grows some. He is butt high right now
    Last edited by Tif_Ann; Jan. 23, 2010 at 04:41 PM.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2010
    Location
    New York
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    78

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    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    I agree about pasture board as long as he is handled daily. One thing about bringing them into a stall even for a short time every day is that they are haltered and led in and out twice a day. That few minutes of manners training IMO goes a long way towards creating a solid citizen - especially as 2-3 years old.

    They are typically pretty easy until two, then some turn into the equivalent of tweens who need a little work to keep their heads in the right places.

    It sounds like you and your sister handle him quite a lot, it's important to keep doing that as it is easy to turn them out and let them be for decent stretches - then one day you bring them in to do something and they have developed a bit of 'tude.
    I second that Sketcher-



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2005
    Location
    upstate New York
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    I third that! I have no quarrel with pasture board, think it's great, in fact, but not to the exclusion of daily handling.



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