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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Default Older horse pees A LOT--reason?

    We have an older gelding at the barn and I've noticed that he is peeing a lot when he comes inside to eat. The horses come in 2x a day for about an hour to eat their grain, but his stall is continually needing to be stripped from this limited time in. It's worse than the hony--who I'm convinced waits to pee until he gets in his stall. The older gelding eats grass hay (pees way more than the 2 getting alfalfa).

    Is this a sign of something? Age issue? Otherwise he seems normal, albeit a bit arthritic. Eating his food, good weight, etc.

    He's not my horse, but I'm just a worrier.

    TIA.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  2. #2
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    Oct. 1, 2003
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    Default

    cushings?
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  3. #3
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    Nov. 4, 2003
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    Dallas, Georgia
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    Default

    IR / Cushings.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    cushings?
    That's a good thought. I guess I was only familiar with the shaggy non-shedding coat symptom.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  5. #5
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    Default

    when I noticed my mare peeing a lot I went and read an article on cushings by Cornell. It was interesting because it was about a QH Stallion that presented with some lethargy, but other than that looked great. He was also peeing a lot. He had cushings.

    After reading up on it I found my mare also had the bumpy fatty deposits (another symptom) , but no long coat and good shedding. Some do not get the long coat, but develope other symptoms.

    Peeing comes from the excessive drinking due to excessive thirst. Take note of his drinking.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  6. #6
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Default

    I don't live there and they drink from a heated auto waterer outside. My horses (he's not mine) are the only two getting water with meals indoors as well, but I will mention it to the BO.

    He has to be drinking extra. Where would it come from? He is literally soaking his stall in an hour or two. My guy (on alfalfa) maybe pees once or twice during that time.

    He did shed out last summer just fine and his coat doesn't seem abnormally long. I will look for the fat.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  7. #7
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    IR--that's interesting. I don't know alot about IR, but his overall weight is actually pretty normal.

    I was horse sitting last summer (we had crazy rain/lush grass) and he came in one evening dead lame. I buted him, and he was better the next day, but when owner came home from her trip I told her about it and we brought him down to the vet.

    Of course that day he was spry and sound and the x-rays showed no sign of anything. I felt like the vet and vet tech thought I was exagerrating the whole thing and I felt guilty for causing my friend extra bills.

    He also abscessed 1 or 2x's last summer--one was particularly terrible and blew out the whole top portion of his foot. I did campaign for limited grass turnout and the BO absolutely agreed (she has a 1/2 pony and was worried about our gorgeous grass), so they went on dry lot until noon after breakfast.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  8. #8
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    Dec. 14, 2005
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    Just east of Short Hill Mtn.
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    Default

    Not refuting the cushing suggestion, just adding another -- my old guy drinks WAY more in the winter in his stall because of a combination of the dry winter air and that the stall water is warmer than the trough water. So when he comes in he downs almost the whole bucket. I'll refill, he'll drink more. By the late night check it needs to be filled again. So he pees way more in his stall in the winter than in the summer (he goes once, if at all on the summer schedule), so much so that I do a quick muck out at the late night so he's not sleeping in the wet. When the temps go over 45, he's back to his normal drinking.
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." - Confucious
    <>< I.I.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 5, 2009
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    Where the blacktop ends-Maryland
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    IR--that's interesting. I don't know alot about IR, but his overall weight is actually pretty normal.
    Best to look at tailhead/behind ribs/cresty neck. We have a pony that actually will look skinny once his coat sheds (yes no long hair and problem shedding) but has the fat deposits, that is the give away. Pees alot, stall always wet, otherwise a fiesty old coot. But unless your friend actually pays for the testing for cushings you will never know for sure.



  10. #10
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    Jun. 22, 2008
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    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
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    Default

    Just because I am dealing with it myself with my youngest horse, I wanted to add possible kidney failure to the mix. According to the literature that I have been reading the past two days:

    "Failing kineys lose the ability to retain protein, concentrate urine, and conserve water. Accordingly, horses with chronic kidney failure had an obligatory output of dilute urine, and must drink a large volume of water to compensate. An alert owner may notice that the horse has an extreme tihrst, or that its stall is wet a lot more than usual. A urinalysis will reveal that the specific gravity of the urine is low and the protein high."

    The only way to know for sure is to get the vet out to run the tests.
    Last edited by MunchkinsMom; Jan. 20, 2010 at 02:10 PM.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  11. #11
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Default

    I'm trying to remember when this started and can't. I don't clean the stalls there on any regular basis, just off and on to help the BO out. It may have even started the end of summer/beginning of fall.

    I have mentioned the ideas on here to the owner--I'm sure she will want to follow-up with the vet.

    He's the grandkid's riding horse when they come to visit. Good babysitter.

    MM--I read your thread this morning. I'm so sorry--that's so sad!!!
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  12. #12
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    Nov. 13, 2002
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    PA, where the State motto is: "If it makes sense, we don't do it!".
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    Default

    If it were my horse I would be checking its thyroid level!

    Anytime I have a horse that's drinking/peeing more than usual and having sore feet to boot I always suspect the thyroid.

    As a horse ages it's more predisposed to Equine Metabolic Syndrome and it sounds like this horse might be headed down that road.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 15, 2004
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    Lancaster, PA, USA
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    Default

    the above issues.........or kidney problems



  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    IR--that's interesting. I don't know alot about IR, but his overall weight is actually pretty normal.

    I was horse sitting last summer (we had crazy rain/lush grass) and he came in one evening dead lame. I buted him, and he was better the next day, but when owner came home from her trip I told her about it and we brought him down to the vet.

    Of course that day he was spry and sound and the x-rays showed no sign of anything. I felt like the vet and vet tech thought I was exagerrating the whole thing and I felt guilty for causing my friend extra bills.

    He also abscessed 1 or 2x's last summer--one was particularly terrible and blew out the whole top portion of his foot. I did campaign for limited grass turnout and the BO absolutely agreed (she has a 1/2 pony and was worried about our gorgeous grass), so they went on dry lot until noon after breakfast.
    I have 2 cushings/IR horses and some of the things I deal with are Abcesses and founder, Neither of them can have grass and they are in a large minimal grass turn out. The horse could have started to founder and you were probably not being over anxious. Also, both shed out although one takes a month longer, neither have the traditional long coat.

    I would have the horse tested, but that's just me. I think you're being smart and an attentive horse person.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2008
    Location
    SW Ohio
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    479

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    He has to be drinking extra. Where would it come from? He is literally soaking his stall in an hour or two.
    This has me wondering if he might be dehyrated, then (caused by whatever is going on). Do a skin pinch test.
    Surely time to get a vet's opinion. Being an older horse, it would be wise to do anyway.
    lindasp62
    Founder & Donor/Account Advisor
    Brennan Equine Welfare Fund
    http://www.brennanequinewelfarefund.com/index.html



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