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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2008
    Location
    NE of Dallas, TX
    Posts
    422

    Default Hay question: Tifton 44 vs Tifton 85

    Ok so here's the question:

    We're thinking about getting some land sprigged this spring with either Tifton 44 or 85. From what I understand, the 44 is finer stemmed and greens up sooner in the spring but yields slightly less tons of hay per acre. The 85 is not as fine stemmed, greens up a bit later but yields more hay.

    Shoud I be worried about the finer stemmed hay being more likely to cause colic? I have some Tifton 44 round bales right now and it doesn't look much different than Coastal to me. Anyone grow either of them and can offer some insight?

    I'm not really worried about the difference in hay production. We will cut hay off of it but that's not my primary goal. I want nice pastures that we can also use for a few cuttings of hay.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2008
    Location
    NE of Dallas, TX
    Posts
    422

    Default

    Bump..

    Anyone?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Posts
    500

    Default

    I don't know about the growing of Tifton, but I will say my horses don't like Tifton hay. Of the two the will eat the 44 better than the 85. Just make sure your horses like the one you plant.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2001
    Location
    Bryan,Texas
    Posts
    2,261

    Default

    When they get hungry enough they will eat what's in front of them.....when what is put in front of with no other choices...they eat.

    As long as the hay is fertilized and cut, cured to the correct moisture and baled, it will be fine.

    I have two different types of coastal, I don't tell the buyers what they are getting because I have found it is the buyers phobias and ridiculous theories that get themselves in a muddle. The KISS (Keep it simple stupid) theory works for me.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Tifton IS coastal bermuda. I personally like a slightly coarser bermuda grass hay (which is what we feed).



  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mlranchtx View Post
    Bump..

    Anyone?
    sorry been to a lesson down in the Valley

    out of my realm so I can't sound intelligent but they maybe can help you

    http://www.haytalk.com/forums/f2/ber...rass-hay-1493/

    speak to haywilson personally...he is from there and specializes in bermuda

    best
    Tamara in TN
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Posts
    500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jcotton View Post
    When they get hungry enough they will eat what's in front of them.....when what is put in front of with no other choices...they eat.

    As long as the hay is fertilized and cut, cured to the correct moisture and baled, it will be fine.

    I have two different types of coastal, I don't tell the buyers what they are getting because I have found it is the buyers phobias and ridiculous theories that get themselves in a muddle. The KISS (Keep it simple stupid) theory works for me.
    Glad I don't get my hay from Bryan.


    Tamara intresting reads. Thanks.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,051

    Default Russell, Tift 85, 44, alicia, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    Tifton IS coastal bermuda. I personally like a slightly coarser bermuda grass hay (which is what we feed).
    Tift 44 and 85 are both coastal bermuda.

    And Tamara can tell you everything, when she has time, or............

    You can contact the Georgia Agricultural Station in Tifton GA, where the varieties of hay were developed, or.............

    You can contact ABAC, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, also in Tifton, GA. ABAC works with the state in testing and developing hays that will grow in the soil of hot humid Georgia.

    check out RUSSELL bermuda, which has thicker stems and stay away from Alicia, which has thinner stems.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,631

    Default

    I have two drafties who live by their stomach. If it doesn't move, they eat it. However, they wouldn't touch the Tift 44 I bought one year. I got four, very hairy eyeballs looking at me and with a resounding "hmph," they stomped off to find something else.

    Bought some Russell Bermuda and it was hoovered....not a stem left.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,500

    Default Place, not variety

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    Tifton IS coastal bermuda.
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/pub..._NO_115=194544


    Tifton, GA is a place where USDA-ARS has a warm season grass breeding farm. Everything new variety developed there will have Tifton as part of the name. They grow bahia grass, too. So calling any kind of hay 'Tifton' is like calling all racehorses Lexington.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Growing conditions, stage of growth, and environmental conditions just before harvest are all far more important to hay quality than the variety.
    So if you live long enough, and eliminated every variety in which you found a batch your horses did not hoover up, you would run out of varieties eventually.
    Names are not important when choosing good hay. If you really want to know about a particular batch of hay, ask for the test.
    I'm speaking to hay growers at the CO Farm show next week, and I was going to tell them that horse owners are now educated so they want to see the hay test.

    http://www.coloradofarmshow.com/page...np2YW5lZi15YXg

    Can we get on the same page?

    Katy



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Katy Watts View Post
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/pub..._NO_115=194544


    Tifton, GA is a place where USDA-ARS has a warm season grass breeding farm. Everything new variety developed there will have Tifton as part of the name. They grow bahia grass, too. So calling any kind of hay 'Tifton' is like calling all racehorses Lexington.
    I was making the point that Titon 44 is a VARIETY of Coastal Bermuda, as the OP said that is "almost looked like coastal bermuda I wasn't CALLING the HAY tifton but pointing this out to the OP!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
    Posts
    1,703

    Default Actually if we want to get technical...

    Tifton 44 and Tifton 85 are both varieties of bermuda. Coastal is a variety of bermuda too. So Coastal and Tifton are not interchangeable terms

    To the OP, the Tifton varieties tend to be a little larger stemmed. Tifton 85 tends to have slightly larger leaves and a darker green color. Overall though, there really isn't a great deal of difference. In the "average" production system, they're all going to yield roughly the same amount of forage. Tifton 85 tends to be less cold tolerant but if you're in TX then this probably isn't as much of a concern for you as it is for us here in NC. We can mostly only plant it in the SE part of the state where the winters aren't quite as cold. Tifton 85 also tends to be a little more drought tolerant. There's some research that indicates that the Tifton varieties may be slightly more digestible and with slightly higher protein but hay quality always depends on when the hay was actually cut.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    I wasn't CALLING the HAY tifton but pointing this out to the OP!

    well the OP is asking not so much about the hybrids as a hay, so much as the hybrids as a graze, as well as hay...

    THAT takes into account some traits that hay hybrids will not have, over traits that forage hybrids will have and makes it a VERY VERY region specific question...

    which is why I suggested haywilson...he's older than dirt ,from TX and really knows Bermuda hybrids in his part of the world..

    I can "google and repeat" all kinds of things, but I will not be able to be as specific and helpful as he can be, for the OP

    Tamara in TN
    Last edited by Tamara in TN; Jan. 20, 2010 at 02:10 PM.
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



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