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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2005
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    Cat Spring, TX
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    353

    Default ISH hindquarters keep growing and growing!! Normal?

    I recently bought a 2 year old ISH. He was put together beautifully and I was learning to get over the "Irish head" he has. Recently his hindquarter have been growing and growing and growing!!!! He is definitly built downhill now. It's not horrible but NOT what I was looking for.

    So here's the question: Do ISH grow uneven like that? Am I going to be stuck with a downhill horse?!!

    I have a background in Quarter horses and they definitly grow like that but I am WORRIED!!
    Last edited by eventer80; Jan. 13, 2010 at 08:35 PM.
    4..3..2..1...Have a nice ride!!!



  2. #2
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    Sep. 23, 2004
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    Holland Twp., NJ
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    Default

    I don't know about ISH's specifically most horses will continue to mature and gain in height till they are 7 or 8. Usually they even up by 3-4, and then get more uphill as they finish up, at least in my experience.
    Do not take anything to heart. Do not hanker after signs of progress. Founder of the Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2004
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    Default

    Get used to it, he'll be ugly until sometime in his 3 year old year, maybe longer with the Irish Draught mixed in there, they tend to grow slower.

    All babies go through a phase where you kind of want to hide them away so that no one can see them. First, the head gets huge, then the back end shoots up, and then the front end starts to catch up.

    You best bet is to look at the parents and any foals they have to see what you're likely to get.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2007
    Location
    Sultan WA
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    Default

    Aw, don't sweat the small stuff. He's just growing! and these Irish kids do take a while to grow into themselves - some more than others. He won't finish up til he's 6 or 7.

    I have a rising three who I have not been able to get a photo of since he was a long yearling - and yes, I do know he's going to be STUPENDOUS, but for now, he's still pretty butt-high Incredible neck and head, though, and already standing over a 9-1/2 inch cannon at 16:2. I could "pass" him for a purebred in most barns

    His four year old half brother is 17:2 - and after being uphill (REALLY uphill!) all of last year, now HIS butt has shot up even with his withers - OMG, how tall will this guy get? Already have to stand on a bucket to brush his back (grumbling)....

    Hey, what's that about the HEAD thing!?!? We don't have any bad heads in our barn!
    Homesick Angels Farm
    breeders of quality Irish Draught Sporthorses
    standing Manu Forti's Touch Down RID
    www.IrishHuntersandJumpers.com



  5. #5
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    Oct. 3, 2002
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    Default

    It's the Irish who say "Three weeks, three months & three years... and in between, hide them behind the barn."

    The fact that he was 'put together beautifully' as a two year old should've been a warning!

    I have a five year old, just turned five in September, who was haunch high with no neck for the past 18 months or so. Just in the last few weeks she has sprung up in front and is becoming the incredibly elegant swan she was as a baby.

    Mine aren't Irish, but are out of a notoriously slow maturing line, on both sides. I don't usually even back them until four, and the gelding had another year off after that as he was so haunch high and unbalanced... they end up uphill EVENTUALLY, but you do pray a lot in the meantime...
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  6. #6
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    Aug. 28, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AdAblurr02 View Post
    Hey, what's that about the HEAD thing!?!? We don't have any bad heads in our barn!
    Nobody said anything about bad heads

    Unless you're referring to what I said, in which case I was simply pointing out how they never grow all at once.

    Either way, calm down. Sheesh.



  7. #7
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    Jun. 14, 2007
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    Sultan WA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coppers mom View Post
    Nobody said anything about bad heads

    Unless you're referring to what I said, in which case I was simply pointing out how they never grow all at once.

    Either way, calm down. Sheesh.
    No bunched up panties here, I must not have put enough smilies in that one. Was NOT referring to anything you said, either. Sorry if it seemed that way, really.

    OP said she had been having trouble getting used to the "Irish Head" thing.... by which most folks mean "head like a Mack truck". I have had numbers of folks tell me that they just can't quite get by the "Irish Head", or how "coarse" these horses must be, so I usually just invite them to come on out and see a few of them in the flesh. 99.99% of the time they go home with their opinions changed

    In my experience with many breeds, MOST youngsters go through a stage where they do seem to be ALL head, at least for a bit, between weaning and yearling. Some worse than others, oh my yes!
    Homesick Angels Farm
    breeders of quality Irish Draught Sporthorses
    standing Manu Forti's Touch Down RID
    www.IrishHuntersandJumpers.com



  8. #8
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    Aug. 26, 2003
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    The good 'ole State of denial
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    Default

    Normal I think for the Irish guys it's 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 years

    My guy has pretty much been butt high or even since birth. There may have been a couple fleeting weeks he was upright - but that was likely the footing he was standing on, lol.

    He has been just a hair under 16h since he was 2 years old. From 2-4 he has bulked up A LOT (like doubled, lol). Measured him a few months ago, 16h (with boots on). I'm not a winter person and we only have an outdoor so the last couple months he's been on vacation and other than feeding him and kissing him on the nose, I haven't been doing a lot with him. Pulled him out for a trim and he is every bit of 16.1 at the withers and 16.2 behind (will be 5 in Feb). He string tests to 16.2, but my hunch is he may hit 16.3 eventually.

    They do grow like teeter totters and they do mature very very late in life.



  9. #9
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    Nov. 28, 2003
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    American Midwest
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    Default

    Some lines are more uphill than others, but at age 2 you are not even close to being finished. One of my purebred mares grew an inch between 7 and 8.

    And if anyone says anything negative about your baby's noble Irish noggin, just tell 'em it has to be big to house his considerable brains.
    Liz
    Lionwood Irish Draught Horses
    irishdraught.co



  10. #10
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    Dec. 1, 2007
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    Gettysburg, PA
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    Default

    Like the others said, you have a breed that will likely be on the slower side to mature, so don't fret. The swan may come and go for anothor couple of years, but the swan WILL reappear and the head will grow on you Now you know why breeders don't always have current pics of youngsters - only occassionally do we get lucky and all of the stars align for picture taking (horse actaully in a swan phase, nice weather, a person available to help, and a cooperative youngster )
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  11. #11
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    Aug. 28, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AdAblurr02 View Post
    No bunched up panties here, I must not have put enough smilies in that one. Was NOT referring to anything you said, either. Sorry if it seemed that way, really.

    OP said she had been having trouble getting used to the "Irish Head" thing.... by which most folks mean "head like a Mack truck". I have had numbers of folks tell me that they just can't quite get by the "Irish Head", or how "coarse" these horses must be, so I usually just invite them to come on out and see a few of them in the flesh. 99.99% of the time they go home with their opinions changed

    In my experience with many breeds, MOST youngsters go through a stage where they do seem to be ALL head, at least for a bit, between weaning and yearling. Some worse than others, oh my yes!
    Sorry, I must've read it wrong. Staying up too late

    I think the Irish horses do often have big heads, they're big horses, so I can kind of understand the "irish head" comment. However, I don't think that big necessarily means coarse or ugly (for example, Ollie), which I think confuses most who aren't used to the breed. We have a 3 year old ISH who's the same size as my mare, but there's a lot more to the 3 year old, and his head is about twice the size of hers (but she has a tiny head, so..). I personally love his "big" noggin

    We have a coming 2 Tenerife baby, and both Tenerife and the foals dam have the most be-a-U-tiful heads, but he looks like a yak now. Not only is his head big, but it literally has no shape he's so hairy. I looked at him the other day while I was feeding and was like



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2005
    Location
    Cat Spring, TX
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    Default

    Thanks for all of the encouragement!! I will wait out the uglies!!!!

    I always wondered why no one had pics of their 2 year olds.................

    His head isn't too bad.........but not what I would call small and refined!!

    I will keep my fingers crossed and hopefully will one day be able to put together a swan to ugly duckling to swan picture timeline!!!
    4..3..2..1...Have a nice ride!!!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2007
    Posts
    1,846

    Default 6 year club

    First...they are worth waiting for.
    Second...you can start training and they do amazingly...you dont have to wait til they are 6 to start. They will look like a different horse later but they are still athletic and eager to learn even if they look...unfinished. I have had purebreds and the mother ship looked totally absurd for 6 years but she was always the most athletic horse I have ever been around as has her son been(not as goofy looking...Praise be to Hangon Johnny). Balanced movement, even when she was not looking very balanced. Graceful and never ever galumpy.
    Third...they think they will be just fine...beautiful even(What are you worried about!?)...I think their mothers tell them so(at least the Irish mothers tell them so). Um...heads may be very ample though should end up proportional...remember the Irish horse is SUPPOSED to have a generous ear and they will be marked down if they are insufficient. They may end up with the distinctive head of the equine Jeeves the butler or the head of a duchess(with perhaps a prominent nose) and they should have the behind of the washer woman.
    Fourth...don't take pictures...just smile knowingly. I like to see baby pictures as they get back to what attracted you in the first place...in time. Just let 2,3,4,5 pass and maybe 6...but by 7 MAGNIFICENCE!

    I sent a 3 yo out to be started last fall and the trainer has cracked a wrist so Louis gets to do free jumping to kill time...Get out of his way he loves this new jumping thing...Yahoo! PatO



  14. #14
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    Jun. 16, 2007
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    1,846

    Default Oh forgot

    Vespucci Bridles...they fit the Irish horses. Just in case the noggin keep growing. PatO



  15. #15
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    Jun. 14, 2007
    Location
    Sultan WA
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    Default

    Vespucci bridles eh? I'll have to go down to my fave tack store and do a bit of measuring.

    The Bobby's WB Ollie uses is good for length in the headstall parts, but the browband is about 1-1/2 inches too short for his incredibly broad forehead, and the throatlatch is barely making the very last hole. I'll likely just remake the crownpiece to a double buckle type and put in a new middle part.
    The browband - well, I've been making them up for a couple other people with real semi-precious gemstones, so may just make the boy one of his very own. Maybe with silver & turquoise, and about 18 inches long?

    Oh- those two year old pics..... PLEASE God, let me get a new picture of Punchy this year! People don't believe he really exists!

    Big sigh.... Big high butt.
    Homesick Angels Farm
    breeders of quality Irish Draught Sporthorses
    standing Manu Forti's Touch Down RID
    www.IrishHuntersandJumpers.com



  16. #16
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    Oct. 3, 2002
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    Default

    They may end up with the distinctive head of the equine Jeeves the butler or the head of a duchess(with perhaps a prominent nose) and they should have the behind of the washer woman.
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  17. #17
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    Aug. 28, 2004
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    Default

    Yeah, Vespucci's run huuuuge! I got a cob sized one for my little mare who is a cob in every other bridle, but it practically fell off her. They have a lot of room in the browband, which is where I find the Irish ponies need it.



  18. #18
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    Nov. 28, 2003
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coppers mom View Post
    Yeah, Vespucci's run huuuuge! I got a cob sized one for my little mare who is a cob in every other bridle, but it practically fell off her. They have a lot of room in the browband, which is where I find the Irish ponies need it.
    What about the nosebands and throatlatches? I find I need OS crown, browband, and noseband in most bridles...?
    Liz
    Lionwood Irish Draught Horses
    irishdraught.co



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2006
    Posts
    33

    Default Giant Bridles!

    You might want to look at the Wylde bridles from Dover. They run HUGE!! The OS even fit my lumpy-headed Perch/TB (much more Perch than TB, by all accounts). Plus the quality is amazing for the money!! Both the bridle and the lumpy-headed, worth-his-weight-in-gold oversized pony.



  20. #20
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    Aug. 28, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterwitch View Post
    What about the nosebands and throatlatches? I find I need OS crown, browband, and noseband in most bridles...?
    Oh don't worry, the throatlatches are absolutely massive. With the cob bridle on Copper's decidedly horse sized head, I could still fit a fist and a half while it was fastened on the last hole. Noseband, pretty much the same deal, it runs very large, and I'd only buy another one if I had a horse that was popping out of a smaller size, but a larger one wasn't quite small enough to be adjusted correctly and look nice.

    I really hate the bridles for this very reason, they are so ungodly wrong in their sizing, but they work well when you've got an ID or something that really does need all that room.



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