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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2007
    Posts
    2,207

    Default Trailer window question & slant question

    I am still on the hunt for my first trailer - used 2H bumper pull. I will be using it mostly to haul my horse to trail rides, lessons at indoor in bad weather, and meeting up with my riding teacher for various things. I might do a schooling show or two, but I am not really showing per-se.

    I have found that the best thing for me to do right now is to go look at ALOT of them to figure out what I like/don't like. A few friends told me they don't like slant load. My horse would be in the front spot all the time - whether I haul alone or with a friend. He is 20, very calm and level headed - I have owned him for over 2 years and he used to be a lesson horse, did shows and was used as a camp/trail horse. I hate to use the word bombproof but he is really a ho-hum kind of horse and has excellent ground manners. I have had him hauled twice, both in step up stock trailers and we had zero issues. Relaxed, and it was clear he was hauled alot in his past. It seems to me the slant loads are less expensive, and I can't see that I would have any issues loading him into a slant load. I also like that he could look out a window in the slant vs. looking straight ahead at perhaps no window or dressing room wall. (I know some have windows).

    What are the slant load issues I am missing? Especially for the horse in the back?

    My second question is about windows. One dealer mentioned to look for one with windows the horse can hang his head out of. I guess the barred windows would fold down. This would have to only apply to slant and obviously when parked at a show or trail entrance while tacking up and getting ready? I'm trying to picture how long my horse would be hanging in the trailer with his head out the window - I would probably unload and tie him while I get ready or tack up. Is this really an issue and advantage unless I would be showing alot?

    Thanks so much - I know they probably sound like silly questions but I am trying to think of all scenarios for both me and a 2nd horse when I would be taking a friend along.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Posts
    739

    Default

    I prefer slants myself. The most common complaints I hear about slants involve; the horse doesnt fit, performance of a horse due to fatigue, not wanting to get in the trailer with the horse.

    The first is self explanatory. I personally dont buy the second, although the majority of my hauls are 2 hours to trail rides. And the last generally comes from people with horses I would consider less than......uhum, properly trained.

    As for windows, they are more for controlling air flow than letting the horse look around. I dont take anything a dealer says seriously.
    Disclaimer;
    Nearly all of what I post will be controversial to someone. Believe nothing you read on a chat room, research for yourself and LEARN.
    Not in the 42% or the 96%



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2003
    Posts
    507

    Default

    I strongly suggest you not have a horse in a trailer with its head head hanging out a window - if the horse spooks up goes the head and perhaps back goes the horse - risking hitting its head / neck / poll on the window frame. I know some folks allow it with no trouble but it is a risk. If your horse is not too big for a slant load it sounds like that would be fine, or a simple stock or stock combo type trailer.
    Risa
    HappyTrailsTrailers
    BalancedRideTrailers



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,215

    Default

    I prefer the slant loads too. If you have really long horses then the stall length in a 7' wide trailer may be too short but there with the 8' wide trailers they get more stall length. In bumper pulls you can get a folding rear tack for your saddles. and a front dressing room for everything els. Much more storage and room for the money.

    I do leave my horses window bars down when I'm parked. There's a point at which you have to quit worrying and wrapping them in bubble wrap. Yes they could bang their head, but I've seen them do that in straight loads. I saw a horse shove his face thru a glass window in a straightload. Saw a horse nearly cut 1/2 his ear off when he thru his head up just as he backed out of a ramped straightload. Caught his ear between hiss head bumper and the back edge of the roof. Sh*t happens. I don't do the obvious stupid stuff but at a point you have to relax and not sweat every darn thing.

    I prefer step-ups also. I often park in rough fielsd or at trail heads where the ground isn't level and the ramps won't sit flat. My horses are very relaxed about the step up and down, are taught to self-load so I stand outside while they jump in. I swing the divider over then go to the window to clip a STRETCH tie to their halters.

    chicamuxen



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,210

    Default

    I prefer a straight load myself, but a lot of it is personal preference and you will hear just as many arguments for one as for the other. Ramp vs. step up same way. I like a step up, but just as many will argue for a ramp.

    I don't worry about windows, since I don't like enclosed trailers. I am serious about ventilation and I like horse trailers with stock sides. Horses seem to like them too, as they are open, airy, and they can see as much as they want. These are also usually cheaper! People always underestimate the amount of body heat horses produce and unless you live in the arctic, you horse is not going to get cold in there!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2001
    Posts
    1,248

    Default

    Personally I'd only get a slant with drop-down windows. Not so that the horse can hang it's head out, but so that I have easy access to the horse's head.

    Another thing to look for is how many partitions/dividers the trailer has and how long the back stall is.

    My old two-horse slant had two dividers. So when I'd load the second horse in I'd close the divider before I closed the door.

    My friend has a two-horse slant with only one divider and the second stall isn't very long. Often when she loads the second horse it will try to turn and follow her out of the trailer or start to back up when she's trying to close the back door. (There's a strap that goes across the doorway for safety.)

    I've got a friend who has a long back stall with no divider and she never has this problem.

    Personally I prefer walk-through straight loads, but it's totally a personal preference.

    My biggest tip regardless of whether you get a slant or straight load is to forego trailer ties and put in Blocker Tie Rings. They allow you to use your lead rope to tie your horse easily and safely. What I like about them is that if for some reason your horse slips and goes down, it will let out enough slack for them to be able to get up.

    http://www.legacytack.com/pc/11190/H...e+Ring+II.html



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,267

    Default

    Slant vs. straight: there is no perfect answer, I'm sorry! On long hauls, either one is wearing on the horse, just like you get stiff and sore too long in the driver's seat. If they have room within those confines to sneeze, blow their nose, wiggle a little, it has to help, so watch the size of the stalls. The last stall on my Exiss is the largest one. On my friend's trailer, with no rear tack ...boy that second stall is a joke. it's TINY. Like, way too small for even my 15.2 h QH to ride comfortably...but he won't ride happily anywhere in my 3H...except that largest, and rearmost, stall. So the cheap slants may be b/c they are itty bitty Or you're finding a good deal! ....The only trick to unloading the rearmost horse off of a slant...assuming it's the small, single rear door..they have to learn to back and twist a little to get off- pretty easily done if you run the long lead rope from halter to right side and over their withers...ask them to back with a tug on that and the geometry works- they yeild and step back and there you go. My guys learned via repetition to wait for a tail tug and STEP STEP STEP before coming on back. I don't tie mine to haul so it's easy...we all have our own tricks, I'm sure.

    I've never had a ramp and never had an issue in the load/unload w/o one. Mine learn that STEP, STEP, STEP verbally from me means yes, you are at the end of the trailer, watch your feet. Never ever unload on slick concrete/any concrete, slick footing, period.. if I HAVE to, I kick a huge pile of shavings out first, for grip and traction.


    Windows: *my* preference is windows I can shut as my 3H is a LQ and I use that stall space while camping. Others wouldn't need that. I don't leave horses on trailers at shows, they are off and tied, so super ventilated for that reason, I don't need/want.... I like windows with bars I can CHOOSE to drop, but the horse can't choose to do so, LOL. My Exiss' window bars have a spring loaded bar that catches them/holds them shut... I reinforced that with a carabiner to secure it better....LSS my horse can't open it, but I could. I wish it had hip side windows for better ventilation, it only has small sliding windows. My wish, then, would be drop windows both fore and aft...

    Go to shows and STUDY trailers. If you drive past a horse campground, drive through, study their trailers. Figure out what looks like a winner...to you



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leather View Post

    My biggest tip regardless of whether you get a slant or straight load is to forego trailer ties and put in Blocker Tie Rings. They allow you to use your lead rope to tie your horse easily and safely. What I like about them is that if for some reason your horse slips and goes down, it will let out enough slack for them to be able to get up.

    http://www.legacytack.com/pc/11190/H...e+Ring+II.html
    You can solve this without buying any kind of fancy clips or gimmicks. I just put a piece of hay string between trailer tie and wall, makes a built in breakaway.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2001
    Posts
    1,248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post
    You can solve this without buying any kind of fancy clips or gimmicks. I just put a piece of hay string between trailer tie and wall, makes a built in breakaway.
    True, but I'm lazy and don't like switching between trailer ties and lead ropes, or trying to tie a lead rope to a piece of twine.

    Tie rings take about 2 seconds with only one hand.



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