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  1. #1
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    Mar. 13, 2006
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    Question Tell Me About Connemaras

    I have an opportunity to saddle break a 10 year old connemara that a friend has had since a weanling. Long story, ex-wife bought, they split up and she left the pony. Friend doesn't want to keep it forever and would like to get him in sellable condition but he is not a trainer and really didn't want to go to a professional. I expressed an interest having trained a couple of horses in my life to where they are solid w/t/c and jumping courses.

    From what I understand, this little guy (14.3) has had some ground work and has been saddled a couple of times but don't think anyone has been on his back yet.

    I would like to hear from people who have connemaras - personality, potential, public interest, etc. That sort of thing. Someone told me that a 10 year old is pretty set in his ways and being a pony breed has a pony attitude or would age even matter?

    Just looking for some information on the breed and if I should pass. Thanks!
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert



  2. #2
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    May. 8, 2004
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    Growing up, my best friend had a Connemara pony. He was amazing. He was steady as the day is long and he could jump a house. I had a little OTTB, and when she was nervous, I would just plant her nose on his tail and that dear pony would act like a lead pony until she settled down.

    Like all kids, we did some crazy things like riding him bareback with 3 of us on board and we once jumped him while riding double, and took him swimming. He was a truly honest horse and very sound in both mind and body. He was a great trail horse and was successful in the show ring.

    My friend bought another connemara later on and found the mare to be extremely athletic but very high strung. She wasn't sure if it was a different line or just the mare, but she was a handful.

    They are incredibly smart, willing and able ponies.



  3. #3
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    Sep. 30, 2005
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    Windy WY
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    I had one as a teenager. My gelding was very much like what chai said. I was a beginner rider and used him for trail riding, very solid and trustworthy. I later sold him when he was around 8 years old to a lady who trained him to be a jumper. He went on to become very successful.



  4. #4
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    May. 5, 2009
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    I have a Connemata/TB cross I adore. That said, I have not always felt that way- we did not get along at first. I got her at age 6 with some pretty poor training on her- so bad she had flipped on her previous owners. It took almost 3 years for us to finally "click" but now she is the best horse ever. She cannot be TOLD what to do, but if you ask (nicely!) she is fabulous.

    Connemaras are very smart and learn very quickly. This can be a good or a bad thing, depending what they are learning!



  5. #5
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    Jan. 23, 2004
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    Very much what the other poster said. I have a conn/tb and he is an incredible athlete who will go anywhere and jump anything I ask of him. Really smart and extremely athletic. That can either be a really great thing or a really bad thing depending on how experienced you are. My horse is way to smart and athletic for the average handler/rider. I would call him hot but not at all dangerous he just has a go button. He loves to work and if you work with him life is great. If you try to force him oh baby you are in for a fight.

    Setting guidelines and gaining trust is important. My horse had a very bad start or at least the person who started him said he was dangerous and crazy. He is neither but he knows a dummy when he sees one and can easily intimidate



  6. #6
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Our riding school used to get some of those, from needing started to some already riding very well.
    Since I am so short, I got to ride many of them and they were wonderful all around horses and could jump very well.
    To us, that breed meant we just got on and rode off, they didn't seem to come with resistences, like bucking, shying, rearing, I am surprised that one did.
    In general, the ones we got were very steady horses, just show them and they would go along with you.

    Now, they were very serious, with a great work ethic and that is what they wanted, work.

    I don't know if the ones in the USA have that same good old temperament we had in ours.



  7. #7
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    May. 5, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jleegriffith View Post
    Very much what the other poster said. I have a conn/tb and he is an incredible athlete who will go anywhere and jump anything I ask of him. Really smart and extremely athletic. That can either be a really great thing or a really bad thing depending on how experienced you are. My horse is way to smart and athletic for the average handler/rider. I would call him hot but not at all dangerous he just has a go button. He loves to work and if you work with him life is great. If you try to force him oh baby you are in for a fight.

    Setting guidelines and gaining trust is important. My horse had a very bad start or at least the person who started him said he was dangerous and crazy. He is neither but he knows a dummy when he sees one and can easily intimidate
    Your horse sounds like my mare's gelding counterpart! Haha. With my mare's previous owners, she would just throw a temper tantrum when she didn't want to do something. Considering how fast and agile she is, it didn't take long for them to be afraid of her. Every once in a blue moon she will try to test me, but for the most part we have worked out that I am equally stubborn as her and hissy fits will NOT earn her a ticket back to her stall



  8. #8
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    Jan. 29, 2008
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    We have a Connemara/QH cross. Emma is remarkable. We took her in on training board and ended up buying her. My 23 yr old daughter is proud to be the owner of this remarkable pony. Paid the most for her that we have ever paid for a horse....she's the only one that was not "looking for a home" in our herd of ten. My daughter had the opportunity to ride many Connemaras for my friend, who was a breeder. Eventing, hunters, dressage, they can do it all. Good minds, athletic, easy keeps, gorgeous to look at, great feet.....what more could you ask for??



  9. #9
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    Jun. 9, 2008
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    Virginia
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    Personality plus! The connemaras I have known are hardy, intelligent, and have a gorgeous flowing trot. They can be headstrong but if you learn to ask them the right way, they are absolutely fabulous to work with. Both were good jumpers and had a big heart, great work ethic.
    Professional COTH lurker.
    Horses serve as a balm for the disquieted soul, and somehow allow even the most lost to feel at home in their presence ♥



  10. #10
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    Nov. 22, 2003
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    You're a lot better off with NO training than BAD training, which is what so many of us have to deal with.



  11. #11
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    Nov. 9, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn trails View Post
    I have an opportunity to saddle break a 10 year old connemara that a friend has had since a weanling. Long story, ex-wife bought, they split up and she left the pony. Friend doesn't want to keep it forever and would like to get him in sellable condition but he is not a trainer and really didn't want to go to a professional. I expressed an interest having trained a couple of horses in my life to where they are solid w/t/c and jumping courses.

    if you feel confident and have the expreince then do it but if not put it up for sale as what he is and dont lie


    From what I understand, this little guy (14.3) has had some ground work and has been saddled a couple of times but don't think anyone has been on his back yet.

    probably becuase he through a pony fix and no body has had the bottlle to and might be becuase they couldnt ride him so left him or have had serverla people on and hes got ruined

    I would like to hear from people who have connemaras - personality, potential, public interest, etc. That sort of thing. Someone told me that a 10 year old is pretty set in his ways and being a pony breed has a pony attitude or would age even matter?


    the pony 10yrs old no difference between a 3 or a 10yr old to break in only difference is age and knowing

    the gae is no matter but the pony knowings will matter


    knowing means if he is set in his ways and has an attitude then if you lack the expreince you will get hurt why becuase knowing means the pony knows his own strenght and will use it against you which will need expreince hands to deal with him

    Just looking for some information on the breed and if I should pass. Thanks!

    connimaras are good soild all roounders but they are also independant in there way of thinking in other words they love to work



  12. #12
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    May. 21, 2008
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    I started an 11 year old former broodmare under saddle. It was just like starting a youngster. She was set in her ways (which meant her asking "why do I have to have a job?") but also more mentally mature and had a longer attention span.

    The Connemaras I've been around have been pretty stellar, too! Athletic, hardy and SMART.

    Have fun.



  13. #13
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    Mar. 13, 2006
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    Thanks for the responses! If this guy is as smart as my mustang, it will be interesting. I have the experience, having started from totally unbroke to doing low level eventing and one home bred is now a fab youth horse who cleans up regularly in w/p at fair. I always liked working with the young horses and seeing them develop and learn. I think I'll go for it and plan to start campaigning by the end of the season if all goes well.
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert



  14. #14
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    May. 3, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by up-at-5 View Post
    We have a Connemara/QH cross. Emma is remarkable.
    I have a Connemara/QH mare named 'Emma'...

    I also have her brother.

    Great ponies...smart.



  15. #15
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    Nov. 6, 2002
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    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    They have inherited memory. You will be fine.



  16. #16
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    Oct. 23, 2000
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    Illinois
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    Mtn trails, Anyway of finding out his breeding? That could be a big help. Just like any breed, certain lines are hotter or more difficult. But, just like everyone has said, you will love the brains.

    Brigitte is Conn/Tb and absolutely incredible, but she was also incredibly difficult until she turned about 10! Now she knows everything, just ask her!

    Sounds like you could have a lot of fun.



  17. #17
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    Mar. 13, 2007
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    Northern Virginia, 45 minutes east of paradise - 2 hrs during rush hour
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Now, they were very serious, with a great work ethic and that is what they wanted, work.
    We have a coming 4 yo 1/2 connemara, 1/4 Han, 1/4 TB who was supposed to be my husband's trail buddy but is so intense and serious about the work we have doubts she will be happy just trail riding. She wants to be challenged and to think.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



  18. #18
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    I'll try to find out his breeding and take some pics too. Like I don't have enough horses to ride as it is; but my contract job is ending next week so I'll have lots of free time ha ha.
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert



  19. #19
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    Oct. 30, 2008
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    48

    Default Connemaras: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly

    Dear Mtn Trails,
    Let me tell you about our experiences. Come on over to the main site and read this blog post that you inspired me to write:

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/...pay-connemaras

    Hoping to hear what you decide to do!!!!

    Best wishes,
    Elizabeth
    She Rides, I Pay
    www.sheridesIpay.com



  20. #20
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    May. 27, 2009
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    I've been riding two connemaras for a while now. They are the smartest horses I have ever met. Both mares are totally enthusiastic about work though not so enthusiastic about all people. I'm very lucky that I've passed both mares' tests!

    Super athletic (I think they have five legs and a miracle-saving sixth in times of need) and very opinionated! I love these mares so much. I've never felt so safe on a horse as I have with them.
    Forward momentum!



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