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  1. #1
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    Default Anyone feed Nupafeed Magnesium supplement?

    Hi. I'm curious if any COTHers use the Magnesium supplement made by Nupafeed. If so, what have your experiences been? How much do you feed? Have you had any problems with loose manure or gassy but minor diarrhea?

    My horse had been on Nupafeed for several months. Originally I had him on the loading dose of 75 ml twice a day. He had very loose manure, so I backed him off to 50 ml twice a day and his manure pretty much went back to normal. However, repeated testing of his blood showed that his magnesium levels were not increasing as we had hoped. So, I increased the dose back up to 75 ml twice a day. He's been on this dose for about a month now. His manure is pretty good but he has a chronic very slight gassy liquid dribble that will not go away. I'm curious if anyone else has had this problem.

    The reason my horse is on this particular supplement is at the request of vets involved in my horse's treatment for headshaking. They're aware of my concerns but don't have answers at this point, so I thought I would check in here. Thanks!



  2. #2
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    Default

    Bump. Anyone?



  3. #3
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    Default

    Never heard of the stuff.
    I just feed plain old MgOx.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    Never heard of the stuff.
    I just feed plain old MgOx.
    Me too.

    I think that the first sign of 'too much' is loose stools. I have never had it happen and I feed 2 oz/day 56% MagOx so not sure WHEN too much could be reached..

    What does the label on your product say?
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  5. #5
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    Dec. 16, 2003
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    Default Loose stools is the first sign of Mg overdose

    So I'd say if he is having GI tract problems you are giving too much.
    The Nupa feed product is just Mag Gluconate in a liquid form. Mag Ox is much less expensive and can be mixed with water to make a liquid slurry if you want the liquid form.
    Or if you want the convenience then feed Quiessence which is Mag Ox and Mag Proteinate in a pelleted form, and thus more palatable and less likely to cause GI tract problems.

    With the Nupa feed product you are paying fror the slick German packaging and advertising, it provides no more Mg than Mag Ox and less than Mag Proteinate.

    Plus no matter how much you feed you are unlikely to see much change in blood levels, the body controls how much Mg is in the blood at all times, and excess is dumped or not absorbed.
    YOurs
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  6. #6
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    Sep. 11, 2008
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    Default

    I haven't used that particular brand, but I do use a double dose of Quiessence for the magnesium content for my headshaker. I think it makes a difference. It comes out to be about 20,000mg of mangnesium a day. She also gets lysine for nerve health and MSM on the off hand chance that it would help the inflamation that could possibly set off the trigeminal nerve. If your horse doesn't respond to this treatment, maybe discuss the possiblity of trying anti-convulsants or anti-seizure medication. That has taken my horse from a severe head shaker to about 95% normal. She still has some days where she shakes a little, but nothing too severe.



  7. #7
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    Default

    Here's the thing -- my horse was originally put on Quiessence when he was enrolled in the headshaking study at UC Davis. However, after many months of being on elevated doses of it, his blood showed his magnesium levels to be on the low side of normal. UC Davis wants them to be on the high side of normal for the purposes of the study. So, I was asked to switch to Nupafeed to see if it would make a difference. (His most recent bloodwork showed a slight increase, but I haven't gotten feedback from the vets if they consider it to be of any significance...)

    My horse no longer has diarrhea or loose manure, but does have some gassy residual liquid after he poops. He has lovely white socks, so this is a real pain... more importantly, I don't want him to be in any gastric discomfort.

    To add to the complications, he is not headshaking at all. But it's also not headshaking "season", so I don't know if the Nupafeed is making a difference or not. (When he was on Quiessence, the HS was reduced but not eliminated.)

    Again, I appreciate advise and feedback! Thanks!



  8. #8
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    Aug. 30, 2007
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    Default

    This is totally off topic, but they make those special fly masks that are supposed to help head shakers, do you have one of those?
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    This is totally off topic, but they make those special fly masks that are supposed to help head shakers, do you have one of those?
    Yes, I have one and it works really well for us. I feel very fortunate because I know that they don't help all headshakers. Right now I don't have to use it (haven't used it since early November). The one I have is called a muzzle net -- it gives just enough stimulation to somehow block the stimuli that trigger the nerve firing. It's also very subtle and I was able to get a dispensation to use it at some shows last year.

    http://www.equilibriumproducts.com/h...eg_muzzle_net/
    Last edited by lintesia; Jan. 9, 2010 at 08:41 PM. Reason: typo



  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lintesia View Post
    Yes, I have one and it works really well for us. I feel very fortunate because I know that they don't help all headshakers. Right now I don't have to use it (haven't used it since early November). The one I have is called a muzzle net -- it gives just enough stimulation to somehow block the stimuli that trigger the nerve firing. It's also very subtle and I was able to get a dispensation to use it at some shows last year.

    http://www.equilibriumproducts.com/h...eg_muzzle_net/
    I was actually referring to the Guardian Mask (couldn't think of the name!):

    http://www.horsemask.com/products.html

    But I'm glad a simple muzzle net helps your boy so much!
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    I was actually referring to the Guardian Mask (couldn't think of the name!):

    http://www.horsemask.com/products.html

    But I'm glad a simple muzzle net helps your boy so much!
    My horse doesn't need the eye shades. We haven't yet been able to pinpoint the trigger for the headshaking, but he doesn't appear to be photic. As I said, I feel very fortunate that he responds to well to the muzzle net --it's very inobtrusive!



  12. #12
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    Jan. 25, 2008
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    Default

    Also never heard of your product.

    We can't buy MgOx here - no one sells it or uses it anymore when mfgr-ing feed.

    I was going to try Quiessence but found Remission and it workls well for us. It's a different formula than Q but all I wanted was the Mg. I buy it from Country Supply (horse.com) but it's sold elsewhere now.

    Yip



  13. #13
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    Default If he is part of a study, it would be best to consult the

    Quote Originally Posted by lintesia View Post
    Here's the thing -- my horse was originally put on Quiessence when he was enrolled in the headshaking study at UC Davis. However, after many months of being on elevated doses of it, his blood showed his magnesium levels to be on the low side of normal. UC Davis wants them to be on the high side of normal for the purposes of the study. So, I was asked to switch to Nupafeed to see if it would make a difference. (His most recent bloodwork showed a slight increase, but I haven't gotten feedback from the vets if they consider it to be of any significance...)

    My horse no longer has diarrhea or loose manure, but does have some gassy residual liquid after he poops. He has lovely white socks, so this is a real pain... more importantly, I don't want him to be in any gastric discomfort.

    To add to the complications, he is not headshaking at all. But it's also not headshaking "season", so I don't know if the Nupafeed is making a difference or not. (When he was on Quiessence, the HS was reduced but not eliminated.)

    Again, I appreciate advise and feedback! Thanks!
    researchers or vet before you change things. They need your feedback on the side effects and the results, and should be consulted before you change things.

    Call and tell them what is going on and discuss it with them before you change him to a different source of Mg. There are few things more frustrating to a researcher than to have your participants change the treatments without prior consultation, it really screws up the results!

    I suspect that they are finding, as I did all those years ago when I did my initial research, that Mag gluconate while it is palatable and absorbable, it has a higher incidence of GI tract problems, much like Epsom salts do. Yes there are some horses who do fine on it, but plenty of others who do not, and more don't than do, which is why I don't use Mag glu in my product. It had too high a tendency to cause this kind of thing.

    But before you change your horses treatment, please please call the folks who are conducting the study and talk to them.
    Yours
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  14. #14
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    Default

    Excellent point, Melyni!
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  15. #15
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    May. 17, 2003
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    Default

    Yip, I don't know where you are, but FYI, in case you are in the USA, Horsetech sells straight mgOx. You have to go hunting under custom blends on their web site to find it, but it's there.

    No feed stores around here carry it either.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melyni View Post
    researchers or vet before you change things. They need your feedback on the side effects and the results, and should be consulted before you change things.

    Call and tell them what is going on and discuss it with them before you change him to a different source of Mg. There are few things more frustrating to a researcher than to have your participants change the treatments without prior consultation, it really screws up the results!

    I suspect that they are finding, as I did all those years ago when I did my initial research, that Mag gluconate while it is palatable and absorbable, it has a higher incidence of GI tract problems, much like Epsom salts do. Yes there are some horses who do fine on it, but plenty of others who do not, and more don't than do, which is why I don't use Mag glu in my product. It had too high a tendency to cause this kind of thing.

    But before you change your horses treatment, please please call the folks who are conducting the study and talk to them.
    Yours
    MW
    Didn't mean to quote the whole message, sorry!

    I'm not asking for advise about changing my horses diet/treatment... just asking for feedback on Nupafeed. As I said, my vets are aware of my concerns but still don't have answers so I thought I would check on COTH to see if anyone else had the same problems I have with the product. (And yes, I'm also in touch with Nupafeed!)

    Thanks!



  17. #17
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    Jan. 9, 2007
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    Default

    I use the Nupafeed and love it. I have 3 horses on it one with a history of colic (2 surgerys) one a young horse and the other a senior citizen with cushings. None of them have had any gastro problems or loose manure. It has really helped them quite a bit with different stiffness issues. If you really want some questions answered call the distributor and ask to speak to Scott. He will give you loads of info.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tryintogethere View Post
    I use the Nupafeed and love it. I have 3 horses on it one with a history of colic (2 surgerys) one a young horse and the other a senior citizen with cushings. None of them have had any gastro problems or loose manure. It has really helped them quite a bit with different stiffness issues. If you really want some questions answered call the distributor and ask to speak to Scott. He will give you loads of info.
    Thank you for the feedback. Yes, I've spoken at length with Scott -- he was baffled by my horse's gastric issues.

    In any case, I was asked by my HS vet to stop the Nupafeed for the time being. I think we'll revisit the whole magnesium question when his headshaking resumes in the spring (oh joy!).



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